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How much damage?

Discussion in 'Commercial Snow Removal' started by flakesmeangreen, Apr 9, 2002.

  1. flakesmeangreen

    flakesmeangreen Senior Member
    Messages: 217

    My plowing contracts ended on 3/31 and friday I went around to all the properties to check on any damage. Most driveways around here have 3/8" gravel (1B around here). Although the contracts states that I'm not responsible for gravel loss or misplacement, I had some nice piles going at a few drives. IMO they were excessive and moved the gravel back for no charge as a courtesy.

    Here's my question. I backdragged the majority of the gravel back with the plow and then finish raked a little. It obviously saved me a ton of time. I know a snow plow really isn't intended to do this but how much damage is really being done? The way I figured it was that if the plow pushed the gravel there in the first place, along with all the weight of the snow, I can't be doing that much damage to the plow and truck only backdragging the gravel a little at a time. Out of the 9 drives I repaired, only one seemed to strain the truck & therefore required 4x4.
     
  2. Ohiosnow

    Ohiosnow Senior Member
    from Ohio
    Messages: 415

    Damage ?

    The gravel will nick the HE!! out of the paint but not much else other than if you backdragged high piles. That could nick the angle crome rod cylinders & that will cause possible leaks.

    But if your pushing & Don't mind the paint you can use it like a bull-dozer. Many years ago I moved 20 tons of bank-run fill dirt with a old Chevy truck with a Meyer blade around my 44'x50' pole building. You just have to take it easy on how big (little bites) of a bite you take & use the 4x4 it makes it alot easier on the truck ;) .
     
  3. bubble boy

    bubble boy Member
    Messages: 44

    just remember if you do plan on using the plow for something intensive in the summer, watch your temps.

    plowing in below freezing temperature is one thing.

    plowing dirt for two hours in summer temperatures i would think could cause excess engine, tranny heat.

    i know most wouldn't consider such excessive usage of their plow in a non-snow situation, just a thought i had.
     
  4. Ohiosnow

    Ohiosnow Senior Member
    from Ohio
    Messages: 415

    Summer temperatures

    Never had a problem with it overheating or even gettig hot. It's not like your driving it down the highway 70mph in 90 deg. heat with the plow up blocking the radiator.

    Like I said just take it slow & easy & you should be fine;) IMO
     
  5. flakesmeangreen

    flakesmeangreen Senior Member
    Messages: 217

    Thanks for the info! Paint is easily repaired. Only planning on using it to pull back gravel in the spring. Didn't think about the angle cylinders, I'll keep that in mind.
     
  6. digger242j

    digger242j Senior Member
    Messages: 672

    An eighty-something year old friend of mine, who has just about done and seen it all, told me, "NEVER put a dozer operator in a plow truck. They forget what they're operating." (And he was just talking about pushing snow...)

    Well, there's the one exception--an old Chevy with a Meyer.... ;)
     
  7. Ohiosnow

    Ohiosnow Senior Member
    from Ohio
    Messages: 415

    Digger

    I find it funny how after talking about this my friend is building a 32'x40' pole barn right now & his excavator didn't show up yesterday. I told him to use his old back-up truck with a Meyer to push 6 ton of #1 & #2 limestone rock so the lumber truck could drop it's load. The driver started laughing at me & said there was no way in He!! it could do that so I asked my friend if I could jump in & move the pile ;) . Well it worked like a charm, I just wish he had his summer tires on as they are 3" wider & I could have move even more stone faster :D. Later in the day the dozer showed up & asked who moved the stone when he told him a snowplow did it he said he has did the same thing a couple of times himself years ago ;) .
     
  8. digger242j

    digger242j Senior Member
    Messages: 672

    LOL. Maybe we should talk about winning a few million in the lottery?

    Years ago I did an addition foundation and sewer job for a guy. He had an F-150 short bed with a Meyer plow. He used the truck to grade the yard before he put down topsoil. That was the first time I'd seen that done. Actually, I think it was the only time I've seen that done. Just because you *can* do it that doesn't mean it's not bad for the equipment. (A fact that I've proven to myself over and over with all sorts of tools and equipment over the years, but which it seems I'm still too dumb to ever actually learn.)

    :rolleyes:
     
  9. Ohiosnow

    Ohiosnow Senior Member
    from Ohio
    Messages: 415

    Digger

    Are you psychic, I played the lottery last night for the first time in 6-months as the Ohio Super Lotto was at $75 million. :eek: The only problem is I didn't have the winning #'s :mad: Oh well, I didn't want to retire early anyway.


    Again IMHO if you go slow & easy it's not bad for the blade or truck. With HEAVY WET SNOW amost everyone I know has really abused their equipment 100% more. Slamming large piles time & time & time again for hours is hard on the truck & blade.

    When moving the limestone rock the other day I nibbled at the pile & truly never even got close to spinning the wheels.
    ;)

    But I do know what you mean as abusing tools & equipment, we all think tools & equipment are made to do more than they were designed too.:D
     
  10. Ohiosnow

    Ohiosnow Senior Member
    from Ohio
    Messages: 415

    my bad

    I typed wrong it was only 56 million & projected to be 75 million this Sat. :p Like it really matters at that amount :eek:
     
  11. digger242j

    digger242j Senior Member
    Messages: 672

    I've yet to have the winning numbers either. Guess that answers your question, doesn't it?

    Psych-o, now that you could make a case for.... :)

    As far as pushing non-snow stuff, even heavy wet snow sliding across a paved surface won't be as hard on a plow and truck as the kind of twisting, uneven forces you encounter when really pushing dirt or stone piles. Compare your 8' snow blade to the blade and arms on a dozer of similar width. You can wind that dozer engine up and hit the biggest piles you can find all day long and never crack a weld or bend a thing. You'll run out of horsepower before you run out of traction. With a truck you need to worry about cutting up tires, twisting drivline components or springs, not to mention busting up the plow itself.

    I agree it can be done, but it bears repeating that it's *highly* *potentially* abusive to the equipment. It bears repeating because there are a few ham-handed clowns (whose vocabularies include neither the words slow, nor easy), out there who'll remember *only* that they read on plowsite that they could substitute their plow rig for a dozer, and they're the very ones who shouldn't be trying it.
     
  12. Ohiosnow

    Ohiosnow Senior Member
    from Ohio
    Messages: 415

    Yea,

    There are some who don't really know what slow & easy really means.

    I know how heavy duty a dozer is as I've ran 1 for over 100 hrs. I've had the pleasure of running just about every type of heavy equipment over the years, I just wish it was all mine ;) .

    Bought my Lotto tickets for Sat. night drawing, the store 1/2 mile from my house has sold 2 Supper Lotto winning tickets (9-million & 6-million ) in the last 10 yrs. ;)
     
  13. billfires

    billfires PlowSite.com Veteran
    Messages: 23

    Over 20 years ago we had a tri-axle dump drop loam at our new home. I got the bright idea that it would be faster to spread the pile with my 1978 Dodge Snofighter than my dad's Craftsman tractor. I took small bites and the truck had no problem spreading the pile. The only thing was that it packed the loam so much I had to have a neighbor rototill it so we could seed it.

    Billfires