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Hot Transmission

Discussion in 'Commercial Snow Removal' started by Bossplower, Mar 3, 2003.

  1. Bossplower

    Bossplower Member
    Messages: 89

    What is the best way to cool off your tranny?
     
  2. wyldman

    wyldman Member
    Messages: 3,265

    Add the biggest aftermarket cooler you can find.If you want more cooling you can also add a finned deep aluminum pan,which will also help increase fluid capacity.

    If you plowing deep heavy snow,you can also use low range to help keep the tranny cool.
     
  3. Tom Baldwin

    Tom Baldwin Junior Member
    Messages: 8

    Cooling trannies

    The best way to cool an auto trans is to let the truck sit and run. This lets the pump circulate the fluid though the coolers and trans. This is a must after working the trans hard (getting unstuck, climbing large hills, carrying or towing lots of weight). Moving on to other work or shutting a vehicle off right after using it the way we do lets the trans soak up all that heat. Just a few minutes will help a lot to extend the trannies life. The air moving though the truck during plowing may not be enough to do a good job of cooling compared to the heat the work produces.
     
  4. porkhead1

    porkhead1 Member
    Messages: 70

    I've even seen some people add an electric fan in front of their aux. cooler with a dash switch to turn "on/off" the fan. I think it was on an "RVers's" truck.........
    You may want to add an trans oil temp guage too.....
     
  5. wyldman

    wyldman Member
    Messages: 3,265

    If your going to sit and idle it to cool it off,do it in neutral.A lot of trannys have very little cooler flow in park.
     
  6. Tom Baldwin

    Tom Baldwin Junior Member
    Messages: 8

    Cool Trans

    Another thing to keep a cool trans, keep the case clean.

    This goes for engine blocks, transfer cases, and ft & rr diffs

    also. That layer of oil, grease, and dirt that covers everything

    after awhile, acts as insulation wrapped around the block or

    case.

    Keep it clean with frequent washes with degreaser and a light

    pressure washing. You don't need a lot of pressure for this, the

    self wash car wash pressure does fine.

    The air will be able to carry heat away from the metal of

    the block or case, helping to keep it cool.
     
  7. Tom Baldwin

    Tom Baldwin Junior Member
    Messages: 8

    Cool Trans

    Another thing to keep a cool trans, keep the case clean.

    This goes for engine blocks, transfer cases, and ft & rr diffs

    also. That layer of oil, grease, and dirt that covers everything

    after awhile, acts as insulation wrapped around the block or

    case.

    Keep it clean with frequent washes with degreaser and a light

    pressure washing. You don't need a lot of pressure for this, the

    self wash car wash pressure does fine.

    The air will be able to carry heat away from the metal of

    the block or case, helping to keep it cool.
     
  8. Mr_Roboto

    Mr_Roboto Member
    Messages: 63

    Tom, good point about keeping things clean. Like they say, a clean engine runs better. Keep everything clean, and they disipate heat as the engineers designed. Plus, when something does break or needs maintenance, it comes apart a lot easier and without the mess.
     
  9. Kent Lawns

    Kent Lawns PlowSite.com Veteran
    Messages: 315

    Plow in low range.
     
  10. tovoninc

    tovoninc Senior Member
    Messages: 105

    This may be obvious but running the fan on your cab heat on hi with the temp selector on max takes a lot of heat from the engine. I run with my windows down so I can see and hear better so the heat doesn't kill me! I also run an aux electric fan mounted to the radiator.

    If you happen to burn your tranny fluid a little be sure to change it and the filter too.
     
  11. John DiMartino

    John DiMartino PlowSite.com Veteran
    Messages: 2,154

    driving habits play a big part in addition to whats been said,get out of the habit of sitting still in gear,keep the truck moving,if the snow's deep/heavy use low range. The reason low range helps so much is you are not sheering the fluid as bad.Anytime the truck engine is working hard at low speeds producing a lot of torque,and the load is high the trans gets very hot due to the sheering action of the stator in the convertor,this is normal,but anything we can do to speed up the input shaft of the tranny for a given road speed(low range) will reduce temps dramically.I always ease in to the throttle when backing and pushing. When my help runs my Dodge the trans temps are 10-15 degrees higher than when i run it.I slip mine in N as i go up the pile,i dont wait for it to stop,then throw it in R as the truck stops on its own. I have a tight torque convertor in the Dodge too,so this helps with the Dodge. The best thing probably is the cooler,get at least a 22000 GVWR one,and mount it in the air flow from the cooling fan if possible.I have a double deep Mag hytec trans pan on my Dodge,and stock coolers,this is more than enough.My GMC is all stock ,but with a 16000GVWR cooler,it needs a bigger cooler,IMO. I have a guage,so i know when to stop and let it cool,clear the windshield,throw some snow at the grille and cooler,it drops right off in temp. The final thign i want to add is the trucks axle ratio and 1st gr ratio play a big part in the temsp when plowing.If you can get a 4.10 gear ratio and your going to plow,get it,the 3.55 or 3.73 is better on the highway,(not always),but for pulling,plowing and work,the 4.10 or 4.56 are the best. The allison trannys in the new HD's has a nice low first gear,great for plowing needing low range would be highly unlikely with that tranny.My dodge trans has a high first gr,(2.45 to 1)this is why the 3.55 gearr trucks overheat the trannys a lot,especially with V10 since they have the torque to plow in high range the fluid in the torque convertor is geting beat to death,it just builds heat faster than the coolers can get rid of it.Cummins trucks have the problem ,but not as bad,they have a lot more cooling capacity via a log type cooler mounted under the exhaust manifold+ the cooler in the front.This problem is compounded by the fact that everyone put bigger tires on the Ram,it makes a bad situation ever worse. The same truck with 4.10's will not run nearly as hot plowing.
     
    Last edited: Mar 3, 2003
  12. Bossplower

    Bossplower Member
    Messages: 89

    Hot tranny

    I have a stock cooler it"s big .Changed fluid today in my C-6 Ford tranny. The fluid was a little burnt but no metal . I also put a tranny spin on filter kit on for extra filtration from perma-cool.

    Big tip if you don't use synthetics (I have Amsoil in my new truck)
    Buy a product called Smartlube or Lubegaurd,they are the same thing . They are in 1 pint containers and help protect from heat .
    My tranny would have been toast without it . The guy said maybe there was snow blocking my grill and under my bumper restricking air to the cooler. The main thing is my tranny still works fine and shifts strong. I added the Smartlube with the fluid change and will change fluid before next plow season.

    Thanks for everyones suggestions, hope I helped someone too
    Steve