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Horrible Lights?

Discussion in 'SnowDogg Snow Plows' started by tom's snow pro, Feb 6, 2010.

  1. tom's snow pro

    tom's snow pro Member
    Messages: 55

    Well this is my first year with a snow dogg, and I havn't had a great storm unitl yuesturday and today. I noticed that with the lights, I can barely see anything? has anyone else had these problems? It seems that the lense is exposed on top, and it is shining straight up, and blinding me!
     
  2. Sydenstricker Landscaping

    Sydenstricker Landscaping PlowSite Veteran
    Messages: 3,882

    Mine were all crappy too at first. But I aimed them to be a little bit above where the truck headlights shined on the garage door. Works perfectly now:nod:
     
  3. 2COR517

    2COR517 PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 7,115

    Actually heard good things about those lights. A couple of guys have retrofitted them onto older Westerns, Fishers, etc.

    Sounds like you just need to aim them. Remember to do it with the plow up, and the truck loaded with ballast for plowing.
     
  4. djagusch

    djagusch 2000 Club Member
    from mn
    Messages: 2,071

    I put some electrical tape over the edge and that fixed it.
     
  5. T Deneen

    T Deneen Junior Member
    Messages: 12

    You may have the early design light brackets.Several of my customers had the same complaint and one got a ticket for having the blade too high and interfering with the lights. Buyers now has higher light brackets that your dealer should be able to provide at no charge if you indeed have the older style.
     
  6. leepotter

    leepotter Senior Member
    Messages: 122

    I had to raise my brackets up to where this only 2 bolts holding the bracket on, for them to shine above the plow.