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homemade undercoating

Discussion in 'Truck & Equipment Repair' started by T-Trim, Jan 13, 2013.

  1. T-Trim

    T-Trim Senior Member
    from NE OH
    Messages: 207

    I figured I would be the one to dig up a old one. I searched long and far on plowsite. I believe the correct name for it was waxoline or something. We made a bunch at the shop a few years ago. Works great but it needs to be at the right temperate to use. If you have a undercoating gun and long wands you could even coat the inside of doors , body panel and etc.

    We spray ours at over 90 degs F . in cold weather its like wax. You can't remove it easily, so it makes a great coating.

    Happy plowing
     
  2. hatefulmechanic

    hatefulmechanic Senior Member
    Messages: 228

  3. plowzilla

    plowzilla Senior Member
    Messages: 289

    I think your referring to Waxoyl. Heard goods things about it but never used it.
     
  4. T-Trim

    T-Trim Senior Member
    from NE OH
    Messages: 207

    Thats what it is Waxoyl. Well when I get into work tomorrow . I'll need to look up the make up. I think either my boss or the other guy who works nights during storms should know where it is. I'll be more then happy to post.
     
  5. T-Trim

    T-Trim Senior Member
    from NE OH
    Messages: 207

  6. hatefulmechanic

    hatefulmechanic Senior Member
    Messages: 228

    Here is a recipe for home made "Waxoyl". It's an old fashioned rust treatment / undercoating:

    2 1/2 quarts turpentine
    12 oz. beeswax / candle wax
    1 quart light machine oil

    With a cheese shredder, cut the wax into the turpentine, stir until the wax has dissolved, (takes a long time; you can use very low heat (a warm room) to aid but be careful) and thin with the machine oil to a brushable / sprayable consistency. Apply liberally. You can use a hand spray bottle to get into closed-off sections if you have a small access hole.


    Please be sensible when you make this stuff; don't go breathing the fumes or applying heat and burning down your house. If you have any doubts about it, err on the side of caution and just buy a commercially available product
     
  7. theholycow

    theholycow PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,180

    I saw that post in the thread you linked. Seems like it could work well.

    Any suggestions for light machine oil? You'd want it to be something clean and relatively pure, and the only ones I know of come in very small bottles. Something like a gallon can of WD40 might also do the job. However, wouldn't turpentine be so thin already that there's no point trying to thin the turpentine/wax solution with oil, instead just use a lower concentration of wax?

    I would assume you can use standard paint thinner (mineral spirits) instead of turpentine. Who has turpentine in this day and age?

    Once you've made this, you could also use it a bicycle lube. Walmart sells the same solution in a little bottle for five bucks.
    [​IMG]
    The white stuff at the bottom is precipitated, settled wax...you shake it up to dissolve it again before you use it. The idea is similar to other bicycle lubes that deliver a grease dissolved in a light solvent that evaporates after it wicks the thicker stuff into small crevices, but applied to the old idea of using wax instead (which is traditionally done for bicycle chains by dipping them in hot melted wax).

    Interesting, just read this on wikipedia: "Turpentine has long been used as a solvent, mixed with beeswax or with carnauba wax, to make fine furniture wax for use as a protective coating over oiled wood finishes (e.g., lemon oil)."

    This subject is of interest to me...after all that money I spent on aerosol cans of undercoating for just the rear half of my truck's frame (a job with which I was not fully satisfied) I'd love more cost-effective protection.
     
  8. plowzilla

    plowzilla Senior Member
    Messages: 289

     
  9. T-Trim

    T-Trim Senior Member
    from NE OH
    Messages: 207

    I have so much stuff saved I don't know where to start. But I Think I found our special mix. Not like yours.

    1 gallon diesel with 2 pounds paraffin wax.

    I haven't had to make much since it hasn't been to bad for us this year yet.
     
  10. plowzilla

    plowzilla Senior Member
    Messages: 289

    How do you mix that or does the paraffin wax just dissolve in the diesel?
     
  11. White Gardens

    White Gardens 2000 Club Member
    Messages: 2,665

    Is this for the bicycle seat????:jester:




    ..............
     
  12. T-Trim

    T-Trim Senior Member
    from NE OH
    Messages: 207

    In a warm area yes. grate the wax to help speed it up. Hard part is finding good wax.
     
  13. vlc

    vlc Senior Member
    Messages: 636

    Thanks T-Trim! I will definitely try this out!
     
  14. vlc

    vlc Senior Member
    Messages: 636

    Would candle wax work instead of paraffin wax? I have a 10 pound bag of the stuff sitting on a shelf.
     
  15. T-Trim

    T-Trim Senior Member
    from NE OH
    Messages: 207

    Not sure. Candle wax might be too hard. I know paraffin is soft. Give it a try.
     
  16. RS69

    RS69 Junior Member
    Messages: 27

    Good thread, subscribed.
     
  17. wildbroncobilly

    wildbroncobilly Member
    Messages: 45

    Wire rope lubricant- I saw this stuff sprayed on a Superduties undercarriage,it dries hard ,lubricates and inhibites rust
    I'm going to try this when I get my rusty pick up box off!
     
  18. plowzilla

    plowzilla Senior Member
    Messages: 289

    I googled the wire rope lubricant and several came up. Do you know which one dries hard?
     
  19. South Seneca

    South Seneca Senior Member
    Messages: 474

    Subscribed too.
     
  20. T-Trim

    T-Trim Senior Member
    from NE OH
    Messages: 207

    Best way to apply is by spraying. You could brush on in those hard to get to areas. if you spray it out look for flex wands to spray into the hard spots. But you need to heat the mix up. that part I can't really recommend for anybody that doesn't feel safe doing. Leave it to a pro with the right equiment to do the job right and safely. And if you can find someone to spray hot asphalt on your stuff go for it. never need to worry about that stuff coming off. Just cover your drive shaft and exhaust system. Easy way to to make your driveshaft out of balance or catch you exhaust on fire. Not good.