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Higher Moldboards, more capacity.

Discussion in 'Commercial Snow Removal' started by SnoJob67, Sep 25, 2001.

  1. SnoJob67

    SnoJob67 Senior Member
    Messages: 384

    I was wondering if anyone could comment on the increased production of the "Heavyweight" plow such as the Western and Meyer units made for medium duty trucks?

    It seems that a 10' plow with a moldboard of that height would push considerably more snow than a plow with a shorter moldboard such as for 3/4 ton trucks. Any commments or speculation as to increased production of the bigger plows?
     
  2. GeoffD

    GeoffD PlowSite.com Veteran
    Messages: 2,266

    The truck moves more snow, goes faster. Keeps the snow from going over the top. Also the truck is bigger so it can handle more weight. Allowing for a taller moldboard, often resulting in a bigger curve, and more capaacity.

    Geoff
     
  3. 75

    75 PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,382

    Can't say from experience, having never used one of the bigger plows, but with a wider (10') and higher blade, they'll definitely move more snow.

    In the right application, larger truck & plow can work well.

    Bigger plow needs to have a bigger truck pushing it though - which in turn means larger maintenance & operating costs, as well as the need for the truck to be able to earn it's keep during the non-snow months of the year.
     
  4. plowjockey

    plowjockey PlowSite.com Sponsor
    Messages: 622

    I'll have a 10' Western HW in service this winter. While I anticipate more production, only time will tell. Either way I can't wait to find out how well it will work.
    I'm also getting ready to install an Artic Groomer urethane edge on it so I'll keep you all updated.

    Bruce
     
  5. SnoJob67

    SnoJob67 Senior Member
    Messages: 384

    Thanks for the quick responses, guys.

    I do expect increased production. I already have a plow like I am discussing. I have a 20,200 lb. GVW International with a 10' plow. I bought it recently. It has a Meyer 10' plow with central hydraulics, dump bed and Swenson undertailgate spreader.

    I have landscape work for it in the summer. I have desperately needed a dump truck, so it will fulfill several functions. Plowing and salting alone would justify the truck IMO. However, I will be able to keep it busy during the green season as well.
     
  6. 75

    75 PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,382

    If you already have the truck, and can put it to work this summer, that's great. Best of both worlds. I wasn't sure from the original post if you were thinking of buying a bigger truck/plow, or had one already.

    Not 100% up to speed on US regs, but with that GVW and if it doesn't have air brakes, that would be a non-CDL truck wouldn't it? That's a point I forgot to mention in my first reply - if the truck gets big enough to be in the CDL class, that opens up another whole "can of worms" as far as who can drive it, among other things.

    We have 2 boom trucks at work now, one's an old Chevy that's got juice brakes and GVW within the limits of a regular driver's licence, and a Ford F800 that has a 33k GVW and air brakes. As of right now, no one else at work is licenced to drive the Ford :D .

    Kind of nice that way, actually - I tend to get rather irate when someone else uses "my" truck and leaves it a mess/out of fuel/etc. :mad:
     
  7. SnoJob67

    SnoJob67 Senior Member
    Messages: 384

    Yes, it is under CDL. Best of both worlds, for sure. I need to get a class c license, but that should be a piece of cake.

    I'm excited at the prospects for snow removal this winter. Last season we only ran one truck. This season three.
     
  8. Larrytow

    Larrytow Junior Member
    Messages: 28

    Snojob 67, Why do you need a class C lic for that truck? How big of a trailer will you be pulling with it? If no trailer and NOT air brakes , a class D regular lic should cover it.

    Regards,Larry
     
  9. greasemonkey

    greasemonkey Member
    Messages: 30

    While the CDL classes are dictated by federal law, the type of license that you need for a commercial non-cdl class truck vary widely state to state. Here in michigan anyone who opperates a 10k /+ gvwr truck for commerical purposes or as part of their job needs a chaufer's licence (15 question multiple guess test, no driving test). In New York the regular licence was a class D and there was a non - cdl class c licence for trucks with a gvwr over 18k. You had to take a writen and driving test that closely resembled a CDL test. I just got my class A w/ air brakes and I think its fair to say that people make a bigger deal out of the cdl test than it really is.

    -J
     
  10. Mark Oomkes

    Mark Oomkes PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 10,857

    I think you will be very happy with that truck\plow\salter combination. Just make sure you have some weight in the back and it will be just about unstoppable.

    I went through trying to keep our first med duty truck under CDL requirements and learned from my mistake. I wish I would have maxed out everything I could have--especially air brakes. Second time around I did though. Now we just have our operators get their CDL and be done with it. We only have two trailers that don't require a CDL anyways.
     
  11. SnoJob67

    SnoJob67 Senior Member
    Messages: 384

    Thanks for the advice, Mark. With some of the big lots I have bid, it may get a workout this season. Especially on the plowing end of things.

    Yes, a class C is needed in Illinois. It is not supposed to be a big deal, though. I'm gald to have a big truck like that in the "fleet." I am trying to stir up some private road work, or subdivision lanes, etc.

    Would that vehicle be 1/4-1/3 more productive than a 3/4 ton pickup with straight blade?
     
  12. GeoffD

    GeoffD PlowSite.com Veteran
    Messages: 2,266

    I can't say and big truck is a 1/4 of a third more productive then a 3/4 ton pick up.


    Here is where the time savings comes in. A big truck can push a 10' blade full of snow and then some. The truck isn't going to back up as fast. However it will stay on track and push a full load, in any lot, on any run. It won't bog down like a 3/4 ton pick up in a big lot with lots of snow.

    Geoff
     
  13. SnoJob67

    SnoJob67 Senior Member
    Messages: 384

    Excellent, that is what I am looking for.
     
  14. Mark Oomkes

    Mark Oomkes PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 10,857

    Ditto to what Geoff said. The windrows won't stop you or move you off to the side. And in a blizzard you can bulldoze one heck of a lot of snow and then clean it up faster.
     
  15. SnoJob67

    SnoJob67 Senior Member
    Messages: 384

    Would three five acre lots be too much for that big truck and another 3/4 ton pickup truck?

    It seems that would be manageable, but I've ONLY dealt with 1.5 acre lots and under in the past.
     
  16. GeoffD

    GeoffD PlowSite.com Veteran
    Messages: 2,266

    That truck will do fine in a 3-5 acer lot. The only trouble is a loader will be needed to stack snow from time to time.

    Geoff
     
  17. SnoJob67

    SnoJob67 Senior Member
    Messages: 384

    Loader is no problem, I can rent one dirt cheap.

    I'm concerned more with how much work to schedule for that truck. I'm having a hard time figuring out how to use it to its full potential.
     
  18. Chuck Smith

    Chuck Smith 2000 Club Member
    from NJ
    Messages: 2,317

    SnoJob,

    When considering how to use it to it's full potential, don't forget about what will happen if that truck was to break down during a storm. I know we hate to think about it, but it happens.

    Not only that, but if you can rent a loader dirt cheap, you might explore buying a snow pusher, and putting that on a rented machine.

    It will run circles around the International.


    ~Chuck
     
  19. SnoJob67

    SnoJob67 Senior Member
    Messages: 384

    Chuck- Thanks for the input. How do most guys manage larger lots when they are located in different areas? It seems a backhoe and pusher would be a bit cumbersome to transport in a storm.
     
  20. GeoffD

    GeoffD PlowSite.com Veteran
    Messages: 2,266

    If I can't line up enough work to keep a loader or backhoe busy at one lot, or in one area, i do the work with truck.

    If I have a lot that could be plowed with a backhoe, and i don't have any other lots near it, I just hit it with the big trucks. However if I have 3 lots that are 1 acre all in a row. I can put a backhoe there, and use it to service all 3.

    Geoff