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Help with a measurement

Discussion in 'Commercial Snow Removal' started by BoulderBronco, Aug 21, 2003.

  1. BoulderBronco

    BoulderBronco Senior Member
    Messages: 233

    I have a 93 Bronco that I was thinking of putting a Fisher on. I and my Dad have been using that combo for almost twenty years and love it. But I don't have much money so I was looking at a used one. It would be one of the older fixed-mount styles. My problem(s) are these. I have a custom winch bumper in front so I need to know how far the plow frame extends out from the grille. If someone with a 92-96 Bronco of F150 could give me that measurement (with where they are measuring from) I would greatly appreciate it. Also my Bronco is lifted which I think will be fine but was wondering if anyone had thoughts on the plow angle on a lifted truck. The frame sits 9" higher than stock but the way I look at it is, an F350 probably sits a good ways off the ground so it can't be a big deal. Thanks for any input.
    Chris
    By the way great site!:drinkup:
     
  2. szorno

    szorno Senior Member
    Messages: 308

    Hello BroncoAir and welcome to Plowsite ! I can't help you with exact measurements but I may be able to give you some ideas and logic. Does your bumper mount into the original bumper mount holes? If it does,then you are likely OK. The older style plow bracket fits between the frame and the bumper. The bracket has holes that match up to the original bumper. The holes should continue to match. You may have to add a couple flat washers as spacers. Unless your bumper sticks out nearly as far as the lifting arm, you should be OK.
    strange location- Colorado and Mass. I gather Boulder, CO. Howdy neighbor:waving:
     
  3. wyldman

    wyldman Member
    Messages: 3,265

    If your 9" higher than stock,there is no way a stock plow setup is going to work.You'd need to frop the plow frame by 9" to be perfect,or at leat 6 or 7".

    The normal Fisher setups on a Ford do not go behind the bumper,they go in front of it.I don't have one with a Fisher on it to measure.

    Looks like your going to have to either make a new mount,or heavily modify the stock setup to get it to work.It might just be easier to make your own truck side mount to fit your lifted truck,and build a custom headgear setup for the lift ram\pump and the lights.You could then unbolt it and take it off in the summer.

    I'd also be careful hanging a heavy Fisher off of that truck.The TTB front ends do not like to carry much weight without splitting in half.A Snoway may be a better option,as it would be much easier to make a dropped mount (I have done a few,we have them on our lifted Jimmy's),and they work quite well.With the truck lifted,you won't need plowlights as the truck lights will shine right over the blade.
     
  4. wyldman

    wyldman Member
    Messages: 3,265

    With that kind of lift,I assume you have different springs in the truck.You will probably need something stiffer,or some sort of suspension aid\Timbren,or air bag to help carry the plow.
     
  5. BoulderBronco

    BoulderBronco Senior Member
    Messages: 233

    Why do you say there is "no way"? The way I look at it is the plow would just have more of an angle to it because the pivot point is higher.
    I think perhaps you might be a bit confused on what I am talking about. Disregarding my custom bumper, which does mount to the same brackets, the plow mounts will mount as usual to the frame. So the plow and lights will ride at the same height relative to the truck. It will be just like a stock truck only the whole thing, blade, frame, lights and truck are sitting 9" higher off the ground. So when I drop the blade it would in theory have to drop 9" more. Of course depending on how I chain it up.
    Thanks for the feedback though. I definitly appreciate it. Let me know if what I just said changes your thoughts or clears anything up.
    Thanks again
    Chris
     
  6. szorno

    szorno Senior Member
    Messages: 308

    Boulder Bronco,
    After re-thinking the height issue, it is touchy. The point is that snowplows are designed to release when they hit an immovable object. That release mechanism is based on the A-frame of the plow being parallel to the ground. With your mount being way high off the ground your release will be squirrely and could damage the truck and plow frame. You can compensate by lowering the mount at the back of the A-frame so the A-frame is close to parallel to the ground. a little variance is OK, but a lot screws up the edge release. That lowering process could get difficult to keep enough rigidity to the mount so that it doesn't bend when you hit your first curb.
    There is a guy in my town that has a lifted mid 70's chevy K20. his plow bracket has attachment points the same height as stock. He has worked a removable bracket system so it comes off for summer 4wheeling. Lots of engineering went into it. (lots of welding too) That is likely what it will take for you. The bumper becomes a minimal issue.
    Let us know what you decide and post pics if you go thru with it.:nod:
     
  7. CT18fireman

    CT18fireman Banned
    Messages: 2,133

    Mock this up using two floor jacks to lift the ears of the a-frame (where it mounts to truck) to the approximate height of where it will rife on truck. This should make this end of the a-frame much higher then the blade side. Sure it will work somewhat when the blade is straight, although the blade will trip a lot more. Not angle the blade to one side or the other while keeping the ears level. The side closer to the "truck" will lift of the ground. Plows just don't bend this way. You will no be able to plow. You need the a-frame close to level. Sure, it can handle slight differences from tire size or ride weight but not a lift. Trust us on this, there is a lot of experience here.
     
  8. wyldman

    wyldman Member
    Messages: 3,265

    They have explained it pretty well.Both the trip function,and the incorrect geometry when angling are the two problems.The A-frame must be pretty level,or within a few inches.

    I say "no way" because there is no way a stock plow setup will work on a truck lifted 9".Even a 3" lift will cause problems sometimes.The shorter the A frame,the more crucial the installed pin height is.

    You need to get the truck side plow frame down lower to the ground,within a few inches of the plow mfg's spec for pin height.A dropped or modified mount can be made to do this.You can also raise the mounting ears on the plow some as well.
     
  9. BoulderBronco

    BoulderBronco Senior Member
    Messages: 233

    Wyldman and friends. You guys are right. I went out to the garage and jacked my Dads plow up and it was quite an angle. The A-Frame was not close to parallel with the ground. The factors of the trip edge and the plow pushing up on the frame of the truck and not along the frame are not going allow me to do this without modifing the plow frame and how it mounts. Thanks for all your help. By the way my springs are heavy duty 6" springs from Superlift. They are plenty strong for the plow and my M12000 winch.
     
  10. CT18fireman

    CT18fireman Banned
    Messages: 2,133

    I have seen and even built drop mounts for both conventional and minute mount. 3" lift is about the max I have built for. Larger lifts will cause huge leverage forces that will actually try to push the plow under the truck.
     
  11. wyldman

    wyldman Member
    Messages: 3,265

    The more you drop the mount,the further back you need to brace it under the truck.The leverage is increased when you drop it,but it can be done.

    Raising the mounting ears some will help reduce the amount of drop required in the mounting frame,and reduce the stress.
     
  12. CT18fireman

    CT18fireman Banned
    Messages: 2,133

    Kind of then defeats the purpose of a lift. Taking a simple plowmount off in the spring is not a big deal. Having to remove more for ground clearance would be.

    Something else not really discussed is the floatation effect of the large tires. People I know have a hard time without weight in a stock Bronco, with big tires going to need a lot of weight.

    I would park the Bronco and look at getting a pickup, maybe a shortbed, for plowing.
     
  13. wyldman

    wyldman Member
    Messages: 3,265

    With all that nice stuff on your Bronco,I was thinking the same thing.
     
  14. BoulderBronco

    BoulderBronco Senior Member
    Messages: 233

    I kind of agree. But getting a whole nother truck would be $3500 at a minimum and that would probably be a POS. I figured if I could get a setup for a few hundred $$$ then go for it. Besides it is a very strong truck. It is a 1 ton drivetrain with the exception of the axles. Not to mention it being very comfortable, great turning radius (even with 37" tires), great soundsystem, lockers, and a winch.
     
  15. wyldman

    wyldman Member
    Messages: 3,265

    Got any pics of the truck,it sounds sweet ?
     
  16. JD PLOWER

    JD PLOWER PlowSite.com Veteran
    Messages: 751

  17. BoulderBronco

    BoulderBronco Senior Member
    Messages: 233

    Yeah thats it. The 1 ton drivetrain is stock in 92-96 Broncos and F-Series. They used the same tranny E4OD and T-case BW1356 in all the full size ford trucks during those years.
    Here is a link to my superford page if you would like to see more pics.my superford page
     
  18. wyldman

    wyldman Member
    Messages: 3,265

    The weak line in that drivetrainis the stamped TTB's.They tend to split (usually drivers side,near the diff) when loaded heavy with a plow.Your custom bumper/winch and a plow would really be pushing the limits of the 1/2 ton TTB front end.

    I noiticed your planning a D60 upgrade.That would carry the plow much better,with no problems.

    Nice truck BTW. :D