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have a few questions?

Discussion in 'Introduce Yourself to the Community' started by jerseydrew, Aug 19, 2015.

  1. jerseydrew

    jerseydrew Senior Member
    from jersey
    Messages: 232

    i will keep it short and put all my current questions in here.

    we already have a business with a customer base (residential cleaning service) i just upgraded my truck (2015 3500) and get my new plow put on friday. the plow is purchased to do my family's homes and office. so i have the insurance and equipment anyway.

    i am thinking of starting small and offering snow removal to our current customer base. i have a couple of guys that would do the shoveling of the walks while i push snow in the driveway.

    Q1. i do not want to deal with salt and the liability of salting. do you guys have a disclaimer in your contracts that the customer signs saying they take responsibility for ice management?

    Q2. do i charge for the season with an event limit? or should i just charge per pass?

    i don ot have to do the snow removal at all it just seems like a good way to get some extra money flowing through the business when we can't go out and do our normal jobs.
     
  2. SnoFarmer

    SnoFarmer PlowSite Fanatic
    from N,E. MN
    Messages: 8,556

    why do you have commercial vehicle insurance with "snowplwing" listed just to plow your families homes?

    It's a good thing you have this as your stepping out.

    you will need to tell your agent about the added liability your taking on , Ie snowplowing< and have it listed on your policy.

    salt, dont salt, have them sign, dont have them sign, none of it will wont stop them from suing you.
    Did you create the hazard, yes, no, .
    This should also be discussed with your agent.
    Maybe a 2mill umbrella?

    you can bill for services a few different ways depending on the customer, each has it's ups and downs.
     
    Last edited: Aug 19, 2015
  3. jerseydrew

    jerseydrew Senior Member
    from jersey
    Messages: 232

    i guess i am going to have to cll the agent. i understand that nothing stops people from sueing but with a contract that states i am not responsible for ice control i feel like they wouldn't have a leg to stand on if they sue for problems with ice. i am toying with the idea just because it is fairly easy for me to move into doing it.
     
  4. SnoFarmer

    SnoFarmer PlowSite Fanatic
    from N,E. MN
    Messages: 8,556

    Your contract with someone else does not remove a injured parties right to sue for compensation.

    Maybe it was water refreezing from your pile of snow you created in the corner of the lot or drive or stepping over a berm while your plowing or that you left behind.

    but i could help limit your liability exposure if you can get them to sign that they will be responsible for all slippery conditions from ice, but still you could be on the hook.
    it's better to have INS than to risk it.
     
    Last edited: Aug 20, 2015
  5. jerseydrew

    jerseydrew Senior Member
    from jersey
    Messages: 232

    1000% i am not trying to skip the insurance at all. plus with strictly residential the exposure should be less and should mostly be people who live in the house. which if they signed off being responsible for ice control then i am not sure how much exposure i would have but i would never try and do anything in business without the proper insurance.
     
  6. SnoFarmer

    SnoFarmer PlowSite Fanatic
    from N,E. MN
    Messages: 8,556

    Just want ya to have your eyes open.

    Yes, I too have "contrasts" where they responsible for salting, but this does not stop someone from suing me for a slip fall
    The lawyers will come after everyone involved and your ins may settle out of court even tho you were not fully responsible, driving up your rates.

    again, did your man-made pile leach water that refroze?
    the tipping point seems to be, did the hazard form naturally or did man have a hand in it.

    Like a down spout that dumps water onto a sidewalk is a man-made hazard.
    or did it rain and freeze, a natural hazard.

    ps think about it , your contract does not negate someones rights to sue you and win in a personal injury case. it could help and it might work to get you out of it.
    but the chances are there going to pay to make it go away.
    Now you are found to liable.
     
    Last edited: Aug 20, 2015