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Giving unimount plow a second life on a tractor

Discussion in 'Truck & Equipment Repair' started by Tractorman, Jun 16, 2014.

  1. Tractorman

    Tractorman Junior Member
    Messages: 2

    Hello, I'm new to the forum so please forgive me if I'm not in the right place.
    I have a nice old unimount plow without the truck wiring and controller. Bought it new, used it two years and been storing it inside since I changed trucks. I want to adapt my 4wd JD tractor to take the plow and use the loader to raise and lower it, and use the plow pump and solenoids to provide left and right swings. I'm trying not to have to buy factory wiring and controller as I'm using limited functions. The plow worked fine last time around, 10 or so years ago so I assumed it would be easy. Wrong.
    I started off hooking a battery up to the motor which took right off and angled the plow to the right. I was told by a nice member of this forum that one of the valves was probably stuck. I put power to each and it sounded like the solinoids were both working. I removed both S1 and S2 valves, (S3 is supposed to be for the raise lower functions only) inspected them ( both very clean) and excercised the valves which moved freely other than spring pressure. I manually put power to S1 while out of the casing and could hear an expected clicking of the solinoid. The valve didn't move but the tension was a little changed when I pushed on it. I put both valves back on as I couldn't see anything wrong, put power to the motor which turns fine and put power to S1 and S2 simultaneously which I read is supposed to allow the blade to swing left. Nothing happened other than hearing the solinoids. I allowed 20 seconds or so. The fluid level is fine, no visible leaks and I'm stuck as to what to try next. Any help would be appreciated.:dizzy:
    Jeff
     
  2. fireball

    fireball PlowSite.com Veteran
    Messages: 536

    guess I'm not understanding what you are doing. If you are using the tractor loader for raising and lowering blade, just add another valve to the valve block to control right or left. You don't need the plow motor
     
  3. Tractorman

    Tractorman Junior Member
    Messages: 2

    Thanks Fireball. I'm using the loader attached to a plow frame and then to the plow. No hydraulic connections to the plow. I thought this approach with the electrical pump would be simpler than using the tractor hydraulics.
    If I did that, the way I see it I'd have to make 4 quick hydraulic disconnects at the 2 bucket cylinders then go to the swing cylinders on the plow with quick disconnects. It seemed like a lot of plumbing and hose expense as I'd likely have to make longer hoses to reach the plow cylinders or cut the ends of them, change to a quick disconnect and make another hose that is long enough to reach the tractor. Your point is very well taken and it for all I know it may be a better long term program as I'm eliminating a system instead of adding one. Maybe the grief I'm having with it right now is a sign. Any input is appreciated.

    Jeff
     
  4. fireball

    fireball PlowSite.com Veteran
    Messages: 536

    if you do a google search:

    adding additional hydraulic valves to a JD model xxxx. You will see how other people have done their plow/grapple setups. JD valve boxes are very accommodating to other manufactures. Most plow motors are big electric draws on electric systems. Your alternator on your tractor isn't really built for heavy electric draws. For what you spend for hoses and fittings will be small in comparison to the frustration that you encounter in a electrical system