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Gas Engine Drive vs. Dual Electric Motors Hopper Spreaders

Discussion in 'Ice Management' started by Kevin Kendrick, Aug 14, 2008.

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  1. Kevin Kendrick

    Kevin Kendrick Senior Member
    Messages: 397

    Just trying to get a grip on what everyone is doing for slide in hopper spreaders. Seems like more manufacturers are making more and more of the dual electric motor spreaders and that people are buying more of them. So what do you run and what are your opinions on gas vs. electric?
     
  2. elite1msmith

    elite1msmith 2000 Club Member
    from chicago
    Messages: 2,762

    i would go with eletric, this is provided you have good , clean DRY salt

    less problems, less fuel , easy to work on, easy to fix

    most are dirrect drives or have a very simple drive system, no clutch, engine, chains and belts to go wrong
     
  3. rblake

    rblake Senior Member
    from dayton
    Messages: 291

    I would try the electric motors. I have three briggs and keep them inside during the winter. they still give me problems. I also have one central hydrolics but that was quite pricy
     
  4. elite1msmith

    elite1msmith 2000 Club Member
    from chicago
    Messages: 2,762

    NOTICE , keyword, clean DRY salt- if using electric
     
  5. Plowin in VT

    Plowin in VT Senior Member
    Messages: 233

    Why does that make a difference in gas vs electric?
     
  6. elite1msmith

    elite1msmith 2000 Club Member
    from chicago
    Messages: 2,762

    I have not used EVERY brand of type on the market, but i have used about 3 different snow way products, as well as a few others.

    they preformed well, however seemed to have problems moving the wet or froven stoff well..

    this could have just been the few tha i have used, but my Gas V box, could spread anything. i think it has more tourque. just has more problems to go with it is the down side

    but if you consider the cost of 1 gal of fuel ($4.) each storm, many of use would use well over $125 dollars, over 6 years thats $750, just in fuel, plus oil costs.....
     
  7. Bporter

    Bporter Senior Member
    Messages: 147

    I have a Salt Dogg 1.5 YD And I love it. I can fit about a ton and a half Overloaded and it never gave me any problems All Season long. I put approx 100 Ton in near the end of the season when i got it And I would Highly Highly Recomend It.
     
  8. JD Dave

    JD Dave PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 11,046

    I really likr the look of the new AirFlow stainless electrics. They look really well built and that's the slide in I would buy. This is just my opinion and I have not ever use an all electric V Box. My salt trucks are cental hydro's and it would take alot for me to ever change. My one 8 yard hydro spreader is a 1980 and it still work every storm.
     
  9. T-MAN

    T-MAN PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,363

    I have a 2 YD Dogg and it has spread well over 200 ton with out ANY isues. The only problems I have had was do to wet salt freezing in the hopper. It spread wet salt fine (Till it froze), you needed the vibrator to keep it moving but it still spread fine. The freezing would occur in a gas unit as well, so dont think your immune to a 1200# rock of frozen salt with a gasser either.
     
  10. btammo

    btammo Member
    Messages: 51

    Do you clean your hoppers out after every salting? Did it freeze overnight or during plowing a storm? Just curious as I need to get a slide in and forget my tailgate spreaders. I just wonder what you do if you load up a yard of salt and only use 1/2. Go home and spread it into the pile? Sorry for being ignorant.

    Thanks
     
  11. JD Dave

    JD Dave PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 11,046

    If your truck is stored in a heated garage, it's ok to leave some in it for a day or 2 but if it sits outside I would either spread it some where on a lot or back into the pile.
     
  12. elite1msmith

    elite1msmith 2000 Club Member
    from chicago
    Messages: 2,762

    same here, the slightest amount of dampness can cause it to freeze if the temps are right
     
  13. kmwharley

    kmwharley Member
    Messages: 94

    New key words: common sense! you should be unloading your salt not letting it set or riding around with it. I have used electric on wet heavy salt at 0 deg and had no problems, but i also don't store salt in the hopper....I load then spread.

    Also your comment about torque is void also. One benefit of electric is that you have all of your torque immediately and don't have to get your motor to a certain rpm, sooooo that is not a good reason......
     
  14. elite1msmith

    elite1msmith 2000 Club Member
    from chicago
    Messages: 2,762

    yes i do have common sense ...THANKS FOR THAT

    and yes i do unload all of it, ASAP - im alittle smarter than to let it sit... but notice, sometimes, its 45 mins in trffic to were i need to spread it... at zero degrees it doesnt take to long to start clumping up


    i have spread with both, and found the GAS motor to go through fare more matieral fast, less problems with jams, and clumps

    i still would rather buy an electric unit, becasue i can keep the salt pretty dry, and they seem to have less problems

    Oh, and yes with an electric motor you do have get up to "rpm speed for touque.... when you turn down the power setting, ur decreasing both its RPM and touque" fyi , i have an electrical engineering degree
     
    Last edited: Aug 16, 2008
  15. JD Dave

    JD Dave PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 11,046

    We do lot checks 7 day/week before 5 am every morning, so our 1 salt truck has salt in it basically for the whole winter because that's what we drive for lot checks. I just wanted to say this, just in case someone was questioning my common sense.:drinkup:
     
  16. elite1msmith

    elite1msmith 2000 Club Member
    from chicago
    Messages: 2,762

    "One benefit of electric is that you have all of your torque immediately and don't have to get your motor to a certain rpm, sooooo that is not a good reason....."


    one more thing to add to that statement... may be i have been spreading wrong all these years, and if i am , SOMEONE pls tell me

    but normally i START the engine... throttle up... and from that point forward , leave the rpm of the motor alone.... its the electric cluch on and off that controls salt flow, the motor keeps a near constant rpm , ... at the proper speed

    i have lowered rpm , a little for say a drvie thru, with landscaping on each side......

    and i might not be a mechanical engineer, maybe some one here can HELP THAT KNOWS MORE.....?

    .. but im pretty sure that an 8.5 hp gas , or 11 if you up grade.... has a lot more touque then a 1 hp electric motor.

    now you can argue that the RPM is higher on the electric motor, and can be Geared down to give more tourque. however the term Horsepower (HP ) is a combination of Speed (rpm) and touque... so if you decrease its speed to 3600 rpm ( same as a gas motor) , the tourque would go up , but either way it will still only be effective 1 hp. with both spinning at the same RPM, you tell me which has more power 8 hp gas, or 1 hp electric? and that would not take into account the pecentage of power lost during the gear reduction
     
    Last edited: Aug 17, 2008
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