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Freezing material in spreader

Discussion in 'Ice Management' started by Bossfan, Sep 7, 2003.

  1. Bossfan

    Bossfan Member
    from Kansas
    Messages: 64

    Ok, this maybe a very extremely dumb question (be honest if it is guys) but is there any way to keep chemical treated salt from freezing in your spreader? Or in your spinner chute? I had that problem a couple times this past year and it kept popping drive chains off my Highway spreader (that was before i got my stainless Honda powered unit) I just want to know if there is some coating by maybe Lubra-Seal or some other company that keeps salt from hardening and sticking inside the spinner. I was getting tired of having to get out and smack it with a crow-bar and hammer!:realmad: :angry: Yes, I know, don't load wet material or transport it down a highway to a jobsite when you aren't going to use all of it right then if the temps are sub-zero. :D Learned that one the hard way. LOL. I would appreciate some feedback. THANKS!
     
  2. Pelican

    Pelican 2000 Club Member
    Messages: 2,075

    Do a search in this forum, there's a few threads on the topic.

    Synopsis is either park in a heated garage or off load the truck.
     
  3. cat320

    cat320 2000 Club Member
    Messages: 2,223

    Most of the guys around here off load and wash there spreaders out, I made the mistake of leaving a small amount in the hopper and it froze so now it gets cleaned out every time.
     
  4. wyldman

    wyldman Member
    Messages: 3,265

    Gotta empty the hopper out after every run.If you store it inside,it has to be well heated.It will still freeze sometimes due to the enormous amount of cold the truck and material will retain.It costs a lot to keep the stuff warm until you need it next time.