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Fire Hydrants

Discussion in 'Commercial Snow Removal' started by NinaS, Mar 21, 2015.

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  1. NinaS

    NinaS Junior Member
    Messages: 4

    Wondering if you charge extra for clearing fire hydrants. Obviously we don't pile snow around them but when snow gets deep, do you charge extra to clear around them? We have a condo complex that has 5 hydrants.
     
  2. Defcon 5

    Defcon 5 PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,674





    Nope..........Part of the service.....Along with keeping mailbox areas free of snow and ice....
     
  3. framer1901

    framer1901 Senior Member
    Messages: 813

    If you price it in there it's a profitable part of the service - here it's mostly expected and priced in there.
     
  4. 1olddogtwo

    1olddogtwo PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 11,507

    Yes, I'm in the Fire restoration business. I need then to save the structure so we can make money.

    Keeping then relatively clean is part of the job.
     
  5. V_Scapes

    V_Scapes Senior Member
    Messages: 942

    For my residential customers if they have one on the property ill just get as close as possible with the plow and push past it. but we dont normally dig them out.
     
  6. grandview

    grandview PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 14,609

    From my town.

    Lancaster

    Winter snowstorms wreaked havoc on the village’s fire hydrants and the havoc.

    Public Works Superintendent William Cansdale said that upon checking with Erie County Water Authority officials, 18 were originally reported missing, with an additional four missing or bent. Twelve have been repaired as of this week. The village rents the hydrants from the authority.

    The ones that are missing either were picked up by the water authority or possibly scrappers. Yet, others were likely hauled away by the village in its snow-clearing efforts and buried under the snow at the village dump on Sheldon Avenue.

    “We’ll find them whenever the snow melts,” Cansdale said.
     
  7. xgiovannix12

    xgiovannix12 PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,419

    I dig em out Include it in the price
     
  8. jhenderson9196

    jhenderson9196 Senior Member
    Messages: 615

    What do they do, turn on the water when someone reports a fire?
     
  9. grandview

    grandview PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 14,609

    Bottled water.
     
  10. derekslawncare

    derekslawncare PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,003

    Chalk this up to you can't believe everything you see on TV. Hydrants are actually dry. The shutoff valve controlled by the nut on top of the hydrant, is actually far underground, in the water main. That is one of the reasons why the FD goes around "flushing hydrants". It is to flush all the rust out that accumulates in the hydrant so that it doesn't run through the pump on the engine when they hook up to them. Soooo, in real life when a car takes a hydrant out, it doesn't actually shoot water into the air. So no, just because the hydrant is gone, doesn't mean the water service has to be shut off. Water still flows like normal through the main.
     
    Last edited: Mar 22, 2015
  11. jhenderson9196

    jhenderson9196 Senior Member
    Messages: 615

    But when you break off the exposed part of the hydrant you must sometimes get cracked plumbing at the T. In hindsight I remember installing a hydrant at a development that had city water. ( not common around here) We did set the T in concrete. I guess that saves it.
     
    Last edited: Mar 22, 2015
  12. Dogplow Dodge

    Dogplow Dodge 2000 Club Member
    from NJ
    Messages: 2,911

    Anytime I do walks on a property, and there's a hydrant, I dig them out. Takes but a half a minute or so with a SS blower, and the rest of the snow falls away.

    I make sure the H.O. is made aware of the service. 30 seconds of my time can save a life if need be to access the hydrant. I consider it part of my public / civic duty to my customer. :)


    Screw the neighbors, though...:D

    [​IMG]
     
  13. Dogplow Dodge

    Dogplow Dodge 2000 Club Member
    from NJ
    Messages: 2,911

    All season long, I knew the township monkeys were plowing in the hydrants, but had no proof of it.


    Well, now I do..... so now what ? Nothing I guess, as it's all melted by now.


    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Not only did he plow it in from the street side, but he pushed it up the driveway apron, and into the sidewalk as well. Nice, huh ?

    [​IMG]
     
  14. grandview

    grandview PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 14,609


    Looks like this x file was solved.
     
  15. UltraLwn&Lndscp

    UltraLwn&Lndscp Senior Member
    Messages: 138

    Charging for clearing hydrants? As an American who values the lives of his neighbors and clients, we mark them in the fall, and keep them open for the FD all winter.

    There is not a thought in my mind that says we wouldn't be responsible, in some way, if there was a fire on a commercial property and the hydrants were not cleared.
     
  16. SnoFarmer

    SnoFarmer PlowSite Fanatic
    from N,E. MN
    Messages: 8,468

    Let the fire fighters dig them out.
    It gets them out of the hall and away from washing their personal cars and trucks.
     
  17. UltraLwn&Lndscp

    UltraLwn&Lndscp Senior Member
    Messages: 138

    If we averaged 40 inches per season I might have the same feeling, but I sort of "hear" what you are saying.
     
  18. JoeG3

    JoeG3 Senior Member
    Messages: 156

    I always clear the hydrants. We had a fire on my street a few years ago and they almost lost the house, the closest hydrant was frozen and the next closest was buried by a neighbors plow. Fire department had to run over 1000' of hose just to access a hydrant, they told me after they were a few seconds from running out of water on the truck. Every year since, after everything else is done I take the time to clear all of them between my house and the main road (7 of them I believe) 30 minutes of my time and I have the peace of mind knowing they are all accessible just in case.
     
  19. BossPlow2010

    BossPlow2010 PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,032

    I doubt you'd feel that way if your home was burning and they were spending time digging out a hydrant rather than fighting a fire. It's hard enough walking through a foot of snow in fire gear.
     
  20. derekslawncare

    derekslawncare PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,003

    I don't know about residential because who can positively say who is responsible for burying them, the city plow or the private contractor, but my guess is that if you are the contractor servicing a commercial account and all the hydrants are buried and there is a fire that is made worse because of lack of access to water, YOU ARE GOING TO HEAR ABOUT IT, QUITE POSSIBLY IN A COURTROOM. As others have said, I think if it's one hydrant, you just keep it cleared, no big deal. If you have several, you figure it in to your quote and you keep them all clear. I definitely would not show an additional charge on the bill to do it. What would happen if there was a fire, oh sorry, the customer was too cheap to pay to have it cleared.
     
    Last edited: Mar 23, 2015
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