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Electric Drum Brakes, Spindle, Stud & Bearing Maintenance.

Discussion in 'Equipment, Tools & Vehicle Pictures' started by creativedesigns, Apr 5, 2010.

  1. creativedesigns

    creativedesigns PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,929

    Thought I'd post some pics on how to maintain Axle Spindels, Studs, Bearings & replacement of electric drum brakes on equipment trailers.


    1) First remove the wheel rims with (Snap-On) Air impact gun & 13/16 impact socket.

    2) Pry off end cap & remove King nut with a Channel Lock or Wrench.

    3) Parts should come off in order as shown in Third pic. King nut, safety clips, fitted washer, then outter bearing.

    **Note : Inner bearing needs to be removed as well, once the seal is taken out.

    :)


    studs 001.jpg

    studs 002.jpg

    studs 003.jpg
     
  2. creativedesigns

    creativedesigns PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,929

    4) Pull steel drum off the spindle & use sand paper to clean the inner circumference clean of dirt & rust build up. Spray Kleen~Flo brake cleaner to rinse the drums clean.

    5) Then remove the 5 nuts & lock washers from the electric drum brake assembly. Snip the wire to remove the complete unit.

    6) Once the Spindle is bare, take a multi-purpose Wheel & Bearing grease to cover the spindle completely.

    :)


    studs 004.jpg

    studs 005.jpg

    studs 009.jpg
     
  3. basher

    basher PlowSite Fanatic
    from 19707
    Messages: 8,992

    Looks like the front grease cap needs replaced it is leaking a little .
     
  4. creativedesigns

    creativedesigns PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,929

    7) Important!!! There are two "Rights" & two "Lefts" for the brake assemblys, so make sure you don't forget the order they go in.

    8) Install new brake assy, using the existing lock wahers & nuts that you previously took off.

    9) Pack inner & outter bearing with this special Packer tool.
    :waving:

    studs 007.jpg

    studs 011.jpg

    studs 010.jpg
     
  5. creativedesigns

    creativedesigns PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,929

    10) Pack the inner seals with a Race Packer, then install the inner bearing.


    11) Re-install the steel drum case & apply a Copper based Anti-sieze to the studs.

    12) Tighten the lug nuts with an impact wrench & clean the wheel rims!

    13) Ajust the brakes with a buddy & solder the wires together with heat shrink tube.

    Ain't that a Beautiful thing! Eh....:cool:


    driver set.jpg

    studs 013.jpg

    studs 014.jpg
     
  6. creativedesigns

    creativedesigns PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,929

    Hey whats goin on Bash!

    Its the first time I've seen a greae fitting at the end of a spindle like that?!! Mabe its just residual grease on it.
     
  7. grandview

    grandview PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 14,609

    Did those parts say Made in America?
     
  8. deere615

    deere615 2000 Club Member
    Messages: 2,919

    funny you should post this my dump trailer brake assemblies are all messed up the little tensioner things fell off and tore up the brakes. where did you buy the whole brake assembly? Are all the plugs for the electrical connections usually the same when you buy them?
     
  9. Triple L

    Triple L PlowSite Fanatic
    from Canada
    Messages: 5,988

    good info but isnt it kinda funny that millionares do work on thier trailer in thier driveway at home and use thier truck as a work bench :whistling:
     
  10. grandview

    grandview PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 14,609

    His limousine was in the garage being fixed by the help.
     
  11. Triple L

    Triple L PlowSite Fanatic
    from Canada
    Messages: 5,988

    By help you mean his wife Hannah Montana in there working on it.....
     
  12. creativedesigns

    creativedesigns PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,929

    Ur right! I should'a used my Cadillac Escalade as my work bench instaed! :)

    ...But the wife took it out shopping with the Platinum Plus credit card! :laughing:
     
  13. grandview

    grandview PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 14,609

    Real Millionaires give their wives American Express black cards to shop with!
     
  14. basher

    basher PlowSite Fanatic
    from 19707
    Messages: 8,992


    Called EZ lube. There to allow you to pump a little grease in to the bearings. That's why they use a tab washer instead of a cotter pin, so the pin does not block the grease path. They really slick units are the "Never-lube", sealed bearings you just replace the entire cartridge if needed. Check the rubber plugs for cracking. They are cheap to replace and I see lots of issues caused by their "disapperance."



    Sound like you need complete backing plates. Pony up the extra and buy the self adjusting. Will help prevent the problem you just had, Sounds to me like the unit went so far out of adjustment it dropped the adjusters. Once that happens you're screwed. Did it mess up the magnet face on the drum? Call Kim (number below) we keep them on the shelf.;) WARNING to the guys with new trailers. The factories never adjust the brakes, the dealer is suppose to do it, if they (the dealer) doesn't then you could be headed for this issue. Remember MOST trailer brakes are NOT self adjusting, Self adjusters have only been on the market in ten and twelve inch brakes for a short time and very few manufacturers are installing them. Dexter recommends adjusting your trailer brakes every 3K miles.

    That's how they get to be millionaires. It's just the destined to be poor that waste their money on fancy garages and specifically designed work benches.payup
     
  15. cat320

    cat320 2000 Club Member
    Messages: 2,223

    very good thread on doing the brakes. at least you could save the drum . what did those run a peice ? I was just woundering if it was cheaper to do it that way vs buying just the shoes and that that device at the bottom ?
     
  16. JD Dave

    JD Dave PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 11,045

    Never new about the self adjusting brakes, thanks Basher. Nice job also Cre.
     
  17. buckwheat_la

    buckwheat_la 2000 Club Member
    Messages: 2,254

    x2 why replace the entire assembly like that, the pads cost 1/10 of the entire thing.jmo
     
  18. Triple L

    Triple L PlowSite Fanatic
    from Canada
    Messages: 5,988

    Hay Cre, I see your running good year rubber on that thing, with putting new breaks on I imagine you've had to put new rubber on a few times already... My experience with good year trailer rubber is there good, for 1 year.... I used to go thru trailer rubber every year until I switched to transmasters... Best trailer tires going IMO... I was on my third season with my last set before they wore out, when I was replacing good year rubber on the same trailer doing less driving every year before I switched... Might save you a few bucks when those wear out and add to that million dollar bank account of yours... LOL
     
  19. Triple L

    Triple L PlowSite Fanatic
    from Canada
    Messages: 5,988


    I think this is one of the first things that I will agree with you on.... Some of my cheapest customers are the richest ones....

    But I'll trade a nice shop with nice tools over a few $$$ in the bank account anyday if im the one actually doing the work.... :drinkup:
     
  20. basher

    basher PlowSite Fanatic
    from 19707
    Messages: 8,992

    Great thread:salute: if I could make a couple comments





    The device at the bottom is called a magnet. Yes it often cheaper to replace the entire backing plate.

    Inspect your drums. Make sure the magnet faces are in good condition. Nothing worse then destroying a new set of magnets because of a scarred drum magnet face.