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E60 Meyers

Discussion in 'Truck & Equipment Repair' started by fred258, Nov 26, 2012.

  1. fred258

    fred258 Junior Member
    Messages: 3

    I had some body work done on my truck in this past spring. The work required the removal fo the solenoid and some wiring related to the plow. Tonight, it's calling for small snow fall, when I hooked up the controller to the wiring harness under my truck's dash the motor for the plow will not stop running. Any ideas what is wrong? How to test for the problem? Any help at I would appreciate. Thanks
     
  2. maverjohn

    maverjohn Senior Member
    Messages: 902

    Sounds like the solenoid is sticking, start with the controler and work your way to the plow.
     
  3. fred258

    fred258 Junior Member
    Messages: 3

    Solenoid

    I assume you mean the maain solenoid on the frame?
     
  4. maverjohn

    maverjohn Senior Member
    Messages: 902

    If thats the one for the plow then yes, you can pull the one small wire off the solenoid with the motor running, if it stops then its the controller, if not then its the solenoid.
     
  5. jasonv

    jasonv PlowSite.com Addict
    from kannada
    Messages: 1,114

    It isn't necessarily the controller in that instance. If dipsticks did some fancy wiring and accidentally rigged up a feedback circuit, then the power from the solenoid could keep the solenoid powered. I suspect that the wires are hooked up wrong. Dipsticks probably have the solenoid's trigger line hooked up to supply. OP is going to have to go over the wiring with a fine tooth comb.
     
  6. fred258

    fred258 Junior Member
    Messages: 3

    It was a ground wire hooked to the solenoid took me about an hour to figure it out.
     
  7. jasonv

    jasonv PlowSite.com Addict
    from kannada
    Messages: 1,114

    Good you got it working. For future reference regarding terminology, you don't have a ground, you have a negative. In wiring your house, you have a ground line, which is called ground because it is quite literally tied electrically into the surface of the planet. Long distance power transmission uses ground voltage as a reference because it allows the power to be transferred over just a single wire rather than having to send both hot and a reference from the point of transmission. It means 50% less wires for power transmission.