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E60 After market Sump Base No Drain Plug

Discussion in 'Truck & Equipment Repair' started by Nice&Green, Dec 4, 2012.

  1. Nice&Green

    Nice&Green Junior Member
    Messages: 19

    There is no drain plug on the after market base. Does this mean I need to take the top off and dump fluid out in order to change hydraulic fluid?
     
  2. LON

    LON Senior Member
    Messages: 749

    brand new ones from Meyers don't have plugs in the bottom. I ordered 3 a year ago and 1 had a plug and the other 2 didn't. Same shipment for all 3.
     
  3. Nice&Green

    Nice&Green Junior Member
    Messages: 19

    So how do you change the fluid?
     
  4. Morrissey snow removal

    Morrissey snow removal PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,799

    drill and tap a hole in it
     
  5. basher

    basher PlowSite Fanatic
    from 19707
    Messages: 8,992

    The drain plugs locked up and the allen hole would strip as often as not. If you don't want to pull the top cap you can use an evacuator though the fill hole. I suggest you pull the top cap it only costs the price of some nylon cup washers, and you can clean the crap out of the bottom of the sump that draining would never remove, Rip that sump screen out while your there, they cause issues and the other filters are adequate to do the job.
     
  6. jasonv

    jasonv PlowSite.com Addict
    from kannada
    Messages: 1,114

    Drain plugs are useless on Meyer pumps. The problem is that the stuff that comes out of them isn't the stuff that you NEED to get out. There is no substitute for removing the lift cylinder and scraping out the pump base from all the sludge that accumulates in them.
     
  7. bls47303

    bls47303 Junior Member
    from indiana
    Messages: 4

    pull the lines off of your plow and hook them up to the pump run the pump side to side till no more fluid comes out. every other year pull the pump apart and clean and replace all of the seals
     
  8. dfd9

    dfd9 PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,475

    :confused::confused:
     
  9. 2COR517

    2COR517 PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 7,115

    I wonder if there is a correlation between the bad rap Meyer gets and running pumps dry?
     
  10. jasonv

    jasonv PlowSite.com Addict
    from kannada
    Messages: 1,114

    Running it dry like that is pointless (because the pump intake is more than an inch from the bottom of the reservoir), but won't hurt it. Even after the reservoir is dry, it takes more than a little bit of turning to completely dry up the pump and allow it to wear.

    The meyer pump weaknesses involve mostly the lift cylinder seal (which let oil out and water in), and the control switches themselves, which are overloaded by the B and C solenoids. Another weakness is the ease by which water gets into the cavity between the motor and the gear pump.
     
  11. basher

    basher PlowSite Fanatic
    from 19707
    Messages: 8,992

    Wow :eek: and I always thought it was an inadequate crossover relief.:blush2:
     
  12. jasonv

    jasonv PlowSite.com Addict
    from kannada
    Messages: 1,114

    The crossover relief valve is adjustable on the meyer pumps, just like everything else.
     
  13. basher

    basher PlowSite Fanatic
    from 19707
    Messages: 8,992

    Only for pressure, not volume. I always thought that the lack of volume in the crossover relief lead to swelling in the C valve creating the consistent "only angles left" issue, good to know that's not an issue.

    So water in between the motor and pump cause this? If not is it the excessive draw (how does that work with the guys using the old school switches) or the piston cup sealing creating the "only angles left" syndrome?
     
  14. jasonv

    jasonv PlowSite.com Addict
    from kannada
    Messages: 1,114

    The valves on meyer pumps fail when they get slightly bent or contaminated by water or other debris/sludge. The older meyer pump valves had very thin stems that bent very easily. They still only take a very light whack to bend beyond use.

    Most of the "only angles X" problems are actually electrical, however. As I've mentioned, the weak switches are overdrawn by the large B and C coils. Once the contacts inside the switches arc for a bit and get dirty, then the B or C coil won't be powered along with the motor as they should be for lift and for one of the angle directions (which can be either left or right depending on which hose is connected to which cylinder). Often times, repeatedly working the switch will grind off the residue from arcing and allow the circuit to make contact, restoring the valve operation. Another major weakness of the system that can lead to "only angles X" problems is in the bullet connectors between the coils and the truck wiring harness. Those are very exposed to the elements.

    Water between the motor and pump causes corrosion or ICE in that area and stops the motor from being able to turn AT ALL. In this situation, the only working function will be LOWER/FLOAT.
     
  15. basher

    basher PlowSite Fanatic
    from 19707
    Messages: 8,992

    Gosh darn I learn something new everyday.
     
  16. jasonv

    jasonv PlowSite.com Addict
    from kannada
    Messages: 1,114

    Sarcasm... the last refuge of the ignorant.
    :waving:
     
  17. basher

    basher PlowSite Fanatic
    from 19707
    Messages: 8,992

    Sarcasm: the last refuge of modest and chaste-souled people when the privacy of their soul is coarsely and intrusively invaded.


    We could swap quotes forever, I have not the time nor inclination



    Dostoevsky, if you were wondering
     
  18. jasonv

    jasonv PlowSite.com Addict
    from kannada
    Messages: 1,114

    How about this idea: you don't reply to me, I won't reply to you. Deal?