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E3 LED Wiring Help

Discussion in 'Strobe Lighting' started by atvsnowplower, Dec 9, 2011.

  1. atvsnowplower

    atvsnowplower Junior Member
    Messages: 18

    I received my four E3 (Amber) LED'S yesterday, along with SHO-ME Switch Assembly 11.002GSM. I'm installing these LED'S on my four-wheeler and I'm seeking some help with the wiring. It is my opinion the wiring diagram is poor.

    Each light head has five wires come from it...

    Yellow:
    Blue:
    White:
    Red:
    Black:

    The switch assembly has three wires

    Red; This goes to the positive battery post
    Black; This goes to the negative battery post
    White; Where does this one go?

    I'm seeking advice on where each one of these wires need to connect to.

    Thanks
     
  2. Too Stroked

    Too Stroked Senior Member
    Messages: 555

    I'm assuming the E3's are wired the same as the E6's I bought a while back. If so, each light head has five wires come from it as follws:

    Yellow: Synchronization (Used to sync pairs or groups of lights)

    Blue: Pattern Select (Used only to select the pattern by momentarily grounding, then left unconnected.)

    White: High / Low power (generally left unconnected)

    Red: (+) Hot lead (Connect to hot switched power from switch (White in your case)

    Black: (-) Ground

    As for your switch:

    Red: This goes to the positive battery post or positive source. (Make sure to add an in-line fuse)

    Black: This goes to the negative battery post or ground (For a lighted switch)

    White: This is the switched power (+) for the lights
     
  3. cameo89

    cameo89 Senior Member
    Messages: 669

    the box's the led modules came in should have had this info on them, mine did

    and for the switch box, white is probably for pattern? but I could be wrong

    Good luck and hope this helps you
     
    Last edited: Dec 9, 2011
  4. cameo89

    cameo89 Senior Member
    Messages: 669

    the box's the led modules came in should have had this info on them, mine did

    and for the switch box, white is probably for pattern? but I could be wrong

    Good luck and hope this helps you
     
  5. Too Stroked

    Too Stroked Senior Member
    Messages: 555

    I'm assuming that his switch is lighted because there's very few other reasons to have a ground terminal on a switch. That ground is for the light in the switch. If it were only a two terminal switch, it wouldn't matter which terminals you used. You'd put it in-line to switch power or ground.
     
  6. atvsnowplower

    atvsnowplower Junior Member
    Messages: 18

    Thanks for the help. Do I run the red wire from the light head directly to the battery positive post? How does the switch wires get tied into all this? As you can see I'm confused.

     
  7. Too Stroked

    Too Stroked Senior Member
    Messages: 555

    Sounds like you've never done any electrical wiring before. If you haven't, I'd suggest getting somebody who has to avoid doing any serious damage to either your LED's or your ATV. Trust me, this is a pretty simple install, but if you do it wrong, you're going to hate yourself. And there are a pretty decent number of wires involved here.

    The red wire on your LEDs is what you need to turn on and off (connect and disconnect) to the postive side of the system. You do this by putting the switch in line to the postive battery terminal with an in-line fuse holder. You can also get positive power off of a fuse block - which opens up the possibility of having it powered only when the key is on.
     
  8. atvsnowplower

    atvsnowplower Junior Member
    Messages: 18

    I've done some basic wiring before, but this seems a little more complicated. I think I can handle this if I could get some better directions. Do the red wires from the LED light heads all need to be tied together then connected to the + post? Same go for the black wire? Where the confusion lies is how to tie the switch into all this?
     
  9. Dissociative

    Dissociative 2000 Club Member
    Messages: 2,066

    sounds familiar to me..
     
    Last edited: Dec 10, 2011
  10. Dissociative

    Dissociative 2000 Club Member
    Messages: 2,066

    sometimes having someone who knows how to do it ....is really worth it.
     
    Last edited: Dec 10, 2011
  11. Too Stroked

    Too Stroked Senior Member
    Messages: 555

    I have to agree with Dissociative here - except I'm better looking. What you're looking to do isn't all that difficult, but there are a good number of wires and connections required. This can lead to a couple of issues. First, there are multiple ways to wire things up both right and wrong. You want to avoid all of the wrong ones because several of them can cause all sorts of collateral damage up to and including flames.

    Second, even if you pick one of the right methods, a good installation is "neat and tidy." That means there's nothing hacked, hanging or exposed. This means your installation will both last longer and be easier to trouble shoot down the road. Oh, and then there's the effect on resale value.

    Finally, if you have somebody who knows what they're doing help you, you'll learn why everything I mentioned above is so true and be able to do this kind of stuff yourself in the future.

    BTW, in answer to your question, all of the red wires from all of the LEDs end up getting hooked to the hot side of the switch, not the battery. If you hook them to the battery, they'll always be on.
     
  12. Dissociative

    Dissociative 2000 Club Member
    Messages: 2,066

    Well, beauty is in the eye of the beer holder.....lol