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DOT Pre- treat setup

Discussion in 'Ice Management' started by EJK2352, Dec 31, 2003.

  1. EJK2352

    EJK2352 Senior Member
    Messages: 192

    Here's a pic of the 1000 gallon pre-treat truck I drive.

    vivatar 041.jpg
     
  2. EJK2352

    EJK2352 Senior Member
    Messages: 192

    Pic of the salt brine storage tank.

    vivatar 042.jpg
     
  3. rainair

    rainair Senior Member
    Messages: 153

    salt brine

    is dot mixing any thing else with the brine?
     
  4. EJK2352

    EJK2352 Senior Member
    Messages: 192

    Salt brine only. We don't put any brine on the roads when the temps. are below 23 degree's, as it can freeze before it drys. We put it down before an event, anywhere from 1-4 days in advance. We also use it to prevent black ice.
     
  5. capital

    capital Senior Member
    Messages: 127

    I am wondering about the hoses hanging down. Are u applying via straight drop or do they have a mist function to them. We apply brine to parking lots and sidewalks but use mist nozzles and 100 feet of hose on the side of the truck. Also do u use a gas engine or a electric for your pump set up ?
     
  6. gt_racer50

    gt_racer50 Senior Member
    from Ohio
    Messages: 484

    Around Central Ohio is appears that it is just a straight drop from the hoses as there are several 6" or so lines in each lane. It appears to be working pretty well, at least on my road. I just wonder what the cost is, there are miles and miles of road treated.
     
  7. capital

    capital Senior Member
    Messages: 127

    Cost of Brine

    We have talked quite a bit with the Iowa DOT which uses Converted Fuel Tankers to apply to the Interstate System here spraying three lanes at a time. They figure their cost out at .06 Cents per gallon. However after you talk to the state what you find is that they are talking about the cost of their salt only. IE the way the states figure their cost are not the way some one in the private sectore would figure their cost. We make 300 gallon batches and have broken our cost down as being $375 to apply 600 gallons (Which one truck can apply in 6 hours on our propertys) (Last storm they only used 400 galloms based on past applications found areas to cut back on spraying). When billed to our clients we come out at $1200.00 billed so our margin is now $825.00. After that you have to figure your fixed over head and margins to come up with realistic figures. We only run one truck for applications and next year will begin running two trucks. Currently we run a chevy 4500 with both a sander and spray tank and next year will begin using another truck with the same set up. Next week we will be installing a larger holding tank of 1500 gallons to allow us to begin applying to lots we do not plow. Last year we tested the system and this year have seen its use double. Their is both a learning curve and an education process you go through with your clients. Also the 23 degree mark is actually rather high as we have sprayed at lower temps and found the h20 count will evaporate and leave behind your desired salt attached to the pavment.
     
  8. gt_racer50

    gt_racer50 Senior Member
    from Ohio
    Messages: 484

    Interesting. Thanks. So it sounds like the content is, salt and H2o. You may not want to answer this, but what is the mixture?, and will it harm sidewalks? I assume that the theory is the same as MC2000, being just a pretreatment?
     
  9. capital

    capital Senior Member
    Messages: 127

    The content you are looking for is around 87 percent. The state uses huge production machinces hooked to their water lines and use front end loaders to drop their salt in on top and then use gravity flow to make it pour over the salt. We use a 400 gallon tank with a spinner on top and run the h2o through the spinner and capture the salt as it dissolves into the water. We use it 100% for pretreatment only. We have heard of people using it after the storm to spray parking lots down but we have not switched to this as we use granular calcium due to tempertaures usally falling after the snow moves out. The State of Iowa uses outside storage tanks and have not had a freezing problems even of down to -34. We store our tanks inside of an unheated building and have not experienced any problems other than the normal problems of getting the small engine started that mixes the material or pumps it into the trucks.
     
  10. gt_racer50

    gt_racer50 Senior Member
    from Ohio
    Messages: 484

    Thanks,I went on line and checked out salt brine, they say 23% salt and 77% water.
     
  11. GripTruk

    GripTruk Senior Member
    Messages: 374

    Re: Cost of Brine

    Wait... .06 CENTS? or $0.06 ?
    Obviously, only a $0.0594 difference, but $.06 is 100 times more expensive than $0.0006 (if my math is right) So, just wondering....
    -Jer