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Does Anyone plow local roads?

Discussion in 'Commercial Snow Removal' started by CAT, Jan 20, 2002.

  1. CAT

    CAT Junior Member
    Messages: 14

    How do you guys price plowing roads?
    I think it would be alot better than plowing parking lots.
    I want to plow some next season, any advice? thanks,
     
  2. Sno

    Sno Senior Member
    Messages: 320

    I too would like to hear from someone with experience on this.

    I have a chance to bid on 5 sq miles of city streets with a 5" trigger.

    The bid the city recomends is 500.00 but that seems very low.

    There are approx. 15 - 20 streets and intersections in this 5 Sq. Miles. Must plow curb to curb and clear all ally openings.

    My feeling is 15 - 20 driveways would be much easier on the equipment.
     
  3. Mick

    Mick PlowSite.com Veteran
    from Maine
    Messages: 5,546

    Sno, is this 5 miles of streets or all streets within 5 square mile area? I don't know about city streets, but for this area, 5 miles of private road (about 15 ft wide) would go for about $100/mi. I wouldn't think they could let it go until there was five inches on a public street either - I don't think I'd go for that. Just too hard to push after awhile.

    I agree with you - get some more driveways for the same money.

    Cat - around here we have long privately maintained roads. These are usually bid by the season. I've become leery of "per push" and usually turn them down because they wait until they have a large snow to get it plowed. Then it's too hard on me and equipment. Before that, they've just driven on the three/four inch snowfalls and pack them down.
     
    Last edited: Jan 20, 2002
  4. 75

    75 PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,382

    Mick - while this is a little off the topic of plowing city streets, your "trigger depth" point got me thinking that the township which plows the roads in the industrial park must have at least an 8" + trigger depth - because there was that much in there as I was plowing Thursday night and they "wasn't there yet". I realize they can't be everywhere at once, but the road heading out to the industrial park wasn't touched either.

    Actually, I think they have a "trigger time" as opposed to depth - regardless of how much snow fell, they always show up about 6:30 am right when the roads get busy with people scrambling to show up for work........................................ :rolleyes:
     
  5. Sno

    Sno Senior Member
    Messages: 320

    It was presented as 5 miles of streets, I guess It looks like more than that on the map.

    So, your 100.00/mile is probably what they are useing also.

    Just sounds like a hassle with the wording they used and all the parked cars to go around.

    The wording states curb to curb and you must call an inspector out when you are done. No telling how long that would take.

    Then, you get to drive somewhere to get paid after you get the inpection slip signed.

    All that is assuming the guy before you plowed curb to curb and didnt leave piles of rock hard snow where some one was parked.

    I might bid 1000.00. 5 miles 5" push.

    ?
     
  6. 4 Saisons

    4 Saisons Senior Member
    Messages: 260

    In my residential route area, the cityplow have also a 6" trigger or they wait until overnight to do it. Only the boulevard and city bus routes get salted and plowed more often. City Sidewalk are on a 1" trigger.

    There is close to 25 streets in this area and the city sub use a payloader and he needs 8 hours to clear all of them.
     
    Last edited: Jan 20, 2002
  7. Columbia Turf

    Columbia Turf Junior Member
    Messages: 22

    the price for plowing roadways depends on a lot of variables. How is the bid written? Is it "per Push", "per Inch" or "per occurance"? It also depends on their insurance requirements. I would bet they want 2,000,000.00 in liability! It also depends on if you have to keep it clean and if you have to be resposible for keeping the intersections clear with ice melt.





    Around my area(Boone County Missouri) the County subcontracts their rural subdivisions. The subdivisions are grouped in groups usually totaling 6-7 miles of roadway. There is no "trigger depth" but you are on call for each event. During the event you are resposible for keeping the roads clean and the intersections melted down to pavement.




    We always did work for them up until last year. The big problem was you never knew when they would call. Once they waited until about 4 inches were down, once called when total accumulation was .6 inches. A trigger depth would be easier to work with imo. The problem would be if it were 5 inches, traffic would have it all packed down and clean removal might be difficult.




    Not doing any work for them now. My cost kept rising and the bids kept getting lower and lower. We pushed the first time of the season yesterday and it was nice not worrying about them. I do miss the income. The way it is here, it can be very lucrative if there is several inches.



    To sum it up, you need to figure your cost of having that truck tied up working on that one project, then figure what that truck is worth plowing a regular commercial job. Remember, one truck doing three $60 jobs an hour is $180.00 per hour. (be sure to add any extra insurance). Feel free to contact me if you want to pick my brain. (whats left)



    Highpoint is still working for the county in my area, Bill whats your call?
     
  8. 75

    75 PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,382

    Mick - while this is a little off the topic of plowing city streets, your "trigger depth" point got me thinking that the township which plows the roads in the industrial park must have at least an 8" + trigger depth - because there was that much in there as I was plowing Thursday night and they "wasn't there yet". I realize they can't be everywhere at once, but the road heading out to the industrial park wasn't touched either.

    Actually, I think they have a "trigger time" as opposed to depth - regardless of how much snow fell, they always show up about 6:30 am right when the roads get busy with people scrambling to show up for work........................................ :rolleyes:
     
  9. diginahole

    diginahole Member
    Messages: 63

    I plow and sand municipal roadways and I quite like it. The town puts the work out for tender every 3 years. Make sure to look into the additional insurance premiums you will have to pay as it is a separate coverage over standard commercial plowing and significantly more expensive.

    I have an 8cm trigger that so far I have not made it to before they call me out. If there is a flake on the roads at 3:30 am they call me out to sand and if there is any accumulation they also give me the go ahead to plow.

    I plow mostly gravel roads. I use a 10' western heavy weight on a class 8 dump truck with a V-box on the back. When I bid the job I figured on traveling 35 kph while plowing. Turns out I can only go 20 kph before the snow blinds me. I am going to install a deflector and I should be able to get the plow up to speeds predicted. I have plowed the roads once with my pickup and an 8' western pro, I wouldn't recomend this kind of service for that plow.
     
  10. Pelican

    Pelican 2000 Club Member
    Messages: 2,075

    I lease one truck to a local Town Highway Dept and we are paid by the hour. They call the shots, dispatch us and tell us how they want the job handled on each occasion. We have a 4 hour minimum per call and they provide the sand/salt material.

    The rate isn't all that great, but the plowing and sanding is easy and a lot of time is spent on "standby", which is on the clock. The way I see it, I keep a man busy and make a few bucks besides. You always get paid, although it can be up to 45 days wait and the truck doesn't get in to too much trouble.
     
  11. GeoffD

    GeoffD PlowSite.com Veteran
    Messages: 2,266

    We plow alot of private roads. That towns won't do because either the residence don't want the towns doing them, or the road isn't to town specs and the town won't do it.

    To make a good profit you want a single axel dump truck, with a plow and wing. We bill private roads at around 1000 dollars per lane mile. Smaller private roads have a different rate, the rate is figured on the condition of the road, and the width.

    Geoff
     
  12. 66Construction

    66Construction Senior Member
    Messages: 315

    I looked into plowing for the city and found the deal with the high trigger is that they have enough equipment to handle all the roads up to a certain amount of snow. Then they call the subs when it gets to the point they can no longer handle it. Also they pay by the hour and tell you where to go.

    Geoff you said $1000 per lane mile, is that for the season or per push? Thanks

    Casey
     
  13. G.Williams

    G.Williams Member
    Messages: 40

    We plow local roads with a 3" trigger and have an entire section of town. The price is given for hourly operation with a 5 cu.yd. dump with operator, and continue plowing with the storm until all roads and intersections are clear and the storm is finished. We call in that the section is completed and the call us to commence the run. That way we can both be on the same page for times worked. Works out well for both of us.
     
  14. Mick

    Mick PlowSite.com Veteran
    from Maine
    Messages: 5,546

    Casey - I'm not really trying to answer for Geoff, but I think I remember from reading last winter that $1000/mi is per trip or "per push". The roads he and I are talking about are very different from each other. The ones I get are very narrow and easily done with one push down and back with a 9' blade which is 7'6" fully angled. When I first read "$1000 per lane mile" I thought "oh, boy am I going to roll in the dough" until I figured out what kind of equipment I'd need and the maintenance to get the accounts he was talking about.

    Rob - re: "trigger time". I've got a couple of those. Except I've set them up similar to "trigger depth" so I'm not trying to push whatever falls overnight all at once.
     
  15. Highpoint

    Highpoint Senior Member
    Messages: 241

    I call 1-900 love snow!

    Columbia Turf got the info down. I guss i'm the reason he doesn't do any more county work. (bid compitition you know) I won the bid for 20 subdivisions this year with a 3 year renewal if the county wants. (they'll take it) We cleared approx. 4 inches from roads and intersections. We even cleaned up a huge mess in a newly developed subdivision. MUD everywhere! Our trucks looked like they had been down at the Missour river bottoms 4 wheeling! Nasty! We threw down 3750 lbs of chemical ice melt at the intersections. Based on numbers so far, I think we really well.

    The major pain is not knowing when they will call. Especially when you have a ton of regular accounts. We have to dedicate 3 trucks to the county when they call. This time around we were able to put a total of 6 trucks in there. Pushing on a Friday night helped out tremdously! We were able to put off accounts that would normally need to be done ASAP. All went pretty well. We had a few minor problems but nothing that can't be fixed in a day or 2. Good Luck!:p
     
  16. plowguru

    plowguru Junior Member
    Messages: 13

    Plowing Roads

    The key to competitive bidding roads is having the right equipment.

    There is a wing for pickup trucks now being offered by Sidewing in Ontario, Canada. This plow is added to the truck behind the cab and works "in concert" with the front plow (any make).
    It can be found at:

    http://www.Sidewing.net

    This plow which was developed in Sweden and redesigned for North American trucks, can make road plowing much more efficient. Big advantage is pushing the banks back while keeping the tires on the pavement!

    I have seen it in operation, and it is impressive!
     
  17. G.Williams

    G.Williams Member
    Messages: 40

    One last thing, the municipality requires $3 million Gen liability.
     
  18. jjdonovan

    jjdonovan Member
    Messages: 30

    I Plow for the local town here

    Our local town,(westfield,mass.) has me on stand-by,(2000 F450/9' western) ,I usually get called out when there is 3" on the ground.We are payed by the hr-51.00 for my size truck. My town only wanted a 200/400 thousand rider. Even though the money is not all that great I think that it is easier on the equipment than say doing small parking lots. there is usually less cars out on the roads less backing up to do! More room to manuver around in and usually easier pushing when I team up with a 10 wheeler to do our route! Just my2c worth...NEED MORE SNOW AND SOON !!!:D :D :D
     
  19. 66Construction

    66Construction Senior Member
    Messages: 315

    Mick
    Thanks for answering that. I was very curious because the city pays by the hour here.
    Casey
     
  20. diginahole

    diginahole Member
    Messages: 63

    Where do I sign up? I can plow 6-7 lanemiles per hour with my 10' blade. I might even consider adding several trucks to the fleet....:D

    Reported spending in the year 2000 for Township of Scugog was about $800 per lane km (500.00 per lane mile) for the entire year.

    Municipal performance report