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Diesel vs. Gas.......questions......

Discussion in 'Ford Trucks' started by rferoni, Mar 9, 2003.

  1. rferoni

    rferoni Junior Member
    Messages: 22

    Hello all. I've been thinking of getting a Ford F-250 Superduty Crew Cab. I don't need a truck this big, but I love the way they look and just WANT one. It will be a big investment for me and I'm even thinking of buying used. What I'm not sure about is do I get gas or diesel? Whatever I buy (new or used) I plan on driving it until it dies. So what are the pros/cons of gas vs. diesel? I've NEVER owned diesel and am a little scared of it I guess. I'm pretty mechanically inclined (with gas engines anyway) but do not like to work on vehicles. Are diesels more maintenance? I've heard oil changes are about $50 a pop? I probably average about 15k to 20k miles a year. Over the next few years the truck *may* be used to tow a boat or slide in camper....If you all need any more info let me know.....Thanks much,

    Ron
     
  2. cat320

    cat320 2000 Club Member
    Messages: 2,223

    well there is not really any maintenance besides filters and oil changes.I will be great for pulling and alot of millage driving.As far as the oil changes the ford has a 14qt capacity But to change oil is easy .For what your saying i would go diesel only other draw back to the diesel is cold weather starting.
     
  3. Brickman

    Brickman Senior Member
    Messages: 133

    I have a 2000 F 250 PSD with a few mods to make it run stronger and faster. I love it. 147,000 miles and still counting, hardly any problems at all.

    Diesel +
    better fuel mileage
    more towing power
    normally have a longer life span than a gas
    -
    usually more $ up front to buy
    cost more for most repairs
    oil changes are more because a diesel has a much larger oil cappacity
    are typically more noisey unless you get a new 03 with the 6.0L PSD

    Gassers +
    cheaper to buy up front
    a little cheaper to repair
    quieter

    -
    typically worse fuel mileage
    shorter life expectancy
    towing power isn't as great as a diesel


    All in all I would go with a diesel over a gas if I could afford it. I have had both and prefer a diesel.
    A diesel is easy to upgrade the power, especially the PSD. With the addition of a power chip you can gain 50 to 140 HP just like that. But then you have other things to consider when you do that. Exhaust gas temps will go up substantially with a power chip. Probably not some thing you will have to worry about much until you go to towing.
    A straight piped PSD sounds awesome.
    If you do go with a Ford diesel I would recommend a subscription to www.powerstrokeregistry.com $35 for a year and it is a great mag, tons of articles and lots and lots of wish list toys for the truck and engine.

    Feel free to shoot me an email if you have other questions
    paulbrickman@outdrs.net
     
  4. rferoni

    rferoni Junior Member
    Messages: 22

    How exactly more difficult are diesels to start in cold weather? The truck will be staying outside, and here in Michigan it can get pretty cold in the winter(sometimes down to -10F, but prolly averages about 20F).
     
  5. cat320

    cat320 2000 Club Member
    Messages: 2,223

    both my diesels start with no problems at that temp but i like to plug them in when it gets below 30 deg. .

    1. they start up easier ,letting the oil get up there easier.
    2. warm up quicker for heat.

    I have had mine for awhile and would not get a gasser.
     
  6. Brickman

    Brickman Senior Member
    Messages: 133

    Mine has always started no problem down to 0 and below, even with out being plugged in. But I would plug in just to make em start easier.
     
  7. Pelican

    Pelican 2000 Club Member
    Messages: 2,075

    From an economic stand point alone,diesels don't make sense unless you're racking up a whole lotta miles like Brickman. The diesel option on the new trucks is about $4600, it would take a lot of miles to get that back in fuel savings alone.

    That being said, the diesel offers other benefits that the gas can't match. TORQUE!!! If you're towing or hauling, then diesel's the way to go, you won't be sorry.

    The diesel also accelerates a lot smoother which helps to get you out of sticky situations. There's a thread running in "Snowplowing" on "Diesels vs. gas" you should look at to get other pros and cons.

    To a lot of people it comes down to just WANTING one, like you said in your opening statement. Nothing at all wrong with that. Real trucks have diesels anyway.:D

    As far as cold starting, I've had 3 Powerstrokes now and have never been unable to start them. If I know it's going down into the teens or below, I'll plug it in to be safe. I have however been able to start my truck after a night of ten below with no plug in.

    One other concern is fuel gelling in extreme cold weather. If your fuel isn't winterized, you run this risk. I had one truck gel up once this season, I was able to clear it after about an hour. Diesel fuel can wax up in extreme cold, which then clogs the fuel filter and shuts the truck down. It requires either a new filter or moving the truck to a warm area to clear.
     
  8. rferoni

    rferoni Junior Member
    Messages: 22

    Just want to say thanks for all the replies. I think I will be looking at the diesels.

    About plugging them in, does that come with the trucks or do you have to buy the plug and whatever it plugs into seperately??
     
  9. cat320

    cat320 2000 Club Member
    Messages: 2,223

    most of them come standared today but if you get a reall old one some didn't so i've heard. You could also plug in and leave on a timmer for the moring if it gets real cold and your concered about electric usage.
     
  10. rferoni

    rferoni Junior Member
    Messages: 22

    Pelican, All

    You make an extremely good point about getting your money back in gas mileage. My dad was looking at both gas and diesel and went with gas for this same reason. He figured it wouldn't be worth it as he gets new vehicles every 2 to 3 years, and doesn't put hardly any miles on them or tows much either. He went for practicality. As I said I just WANT one! This does bring some more questions tho.....

    I'd like to keep the truck about 10 years(minimum) If I put 20k a year on thats 200k in 10 years. Would the gasser last this long you think? I've only owned one new vehicle. I know they have come along way as far as mileage tho. Also, what about resale? Is anyone out there going to really want a truck thats 10 years old with 200k(at least) on it, whether it's gas OR diesel? And if so, could you get some of that $4600 back it cost you for the diesel option?
     
  11. jbutch83

    jbutch83 Senior Member
    Messages: 227

    I bought my first diesel near the end of last year, I and will not go back to a gasser. I'm not that far off from you, 10 min. from the Indiana/Michigan border, and you shouldn't have a problem with cold weather starting. Like Pelican said, the diesel will help you stay out of the sticky situation, I never have come even close to getting stuck, even when I thought there was no way I could get of what I was in. I know my trucks from now on are going to be diesel.

    John
     
  12. Pelican

    Pelican 2000 Club Member
    Messages: 2,075

    Ron,

    I've got a '92 Chevy 3500 with a 454 that has 185,000 on it and doesn't smoke at all. Both Ford and Chevy have a new generation of gas engines now, I don't know how they'll hold up in the long run. Diesels typically last longer because they are built stouter to endure the higher compression ratios.

    You will definitely get some of your money back at resale time for the diesel, typically half regardless of year. Take a look at used truck prices on Kelly Blue Book and see for yourself.
     
  13. tuna

    tuna Senior Member
    Messages: 488

    If your gonna plow get a gas.The diesel crew cab has to much weight on the front axle.
     
  14. Pelican

    Pelican 2000 Club Member
    Messages: 2,075

    Here we go again....:rolleyes:
     
  15. rferoni

    rferoni Junior Member
    Messages: 22

    Nope, don't plan on doing any plowing with it. Maybe for myself and family, but plowing is NOT in the plans. From Pelicans response I'm thinking the subject of front end heaviness on Diesels(or maybe just the crew cab diesel model) has been an ongoing very opinionated subject.:D :D . Hope this doesn't turn into one of those looooooong drawn out threads:cool: Longest thread I ever seen was on a woodworking forum about dust collection. 145 pages, 1200 RESPONSES!!! Thanks again for taking the time to give me advice..........
     
  16. tuna

    tuna Senior Member
    Messages: 488

    Pelican,if I am wrong you dont have to roll eyes at me just set me strait.I could be wrong Im a big boy if I am giving wrong information then just say so because I would like to know the true Facts.
     
  17. Pelican

    Pelican 2000 Club Member
    Messages: 2,075

    Sorry about that tuna, but this subject has just about been beat to death here. Take a look around the Ford Trucks forum and you'll see what I mean.
     
  18. Pelican

    Pelican 2000 Club Member
    Messages: 2,075

    Ron, that's got me thinking, is the crew cab available on the 250? I think it might be the 350 and bigger, due to weight concerns.
     
  19. tuna

    tuna Senior Member
    Messages: 488

    No problem P .The Crew is avail on the 250 my buddy just bought one with a V10.
     
  20. TRITONSNOWREM

    TRITONSNOWREM Member
    Messages: 81

    PSD

    PSD all the way. More power and torque. And as far as starting in cold weather, I live in Chicago and it gets pretty cold here. My 02 PSD sat for 2 days outside in -10 degrees and started right up without being plugged in.