1. Welcome to PlowSite. Notice a fresh look and new features? It’s now easier to share photos and videos, find popular topics fast, and enjoy expanded user profiles. If you have any questions, click HELP at the top or bottom of any page, or send an email to help@plowsite.com. We welcome your feedback.

    Dismiss Notice

cylinder hose gouged by A-frame?

Discussion in 'Fisher Engineering Discussion' started by Megunticook, Jan 21, 2008.

  1. Megunticook

    Megunticook Senior Member
    from Maine
    Messages: 190

    Yesterday I was attaching the carrying chain to my newly refurbished "Speedcast" era plow (with the belt-driven hydraulics), in preparation for driving to town, and noticed to my chagrin that the hose from the driver side angle cylinder was badly chafed in several places, bad enough so that you could see a bit of the metal braid in the hose (hose was new from Fisher last season).

    The chafing was about a foot or two from the brass elbow at the ram, right about where the hose curves back toward the headgear. It looked like there was some yellow paint on the damaged area, suggesting that the hose maybe got pinched between the cylinder and the part of the blade that slides beneath the A-frame. This has never happened before--did I do something wrong?

    I have the brass ell threaded in such that the outlet is just slightly up from horizontal, so that the hose exits virtually straight forward, then curves 180 degrees back around. The cylinder is correctly installed with the ell/hose on the inside. The hose length is 36 inches (local Fisher dealer sold it to me).

    I take it the hose is toast and I need to replace it immediately. How do I make sure this doesn't happen again?

    In past years I had the brass ell angled up at 45 degrees or so, so the hose went up in addition to forward before bending back around. But when I rebuilt everything this year I noticed the Fisher diagram showed the hose running horizontal from the ell, so I changed it. Was that my mistake?

    Also, the Fisher parts list calls for a 32 inch length of hose on the driver side. Would that make a difference?

    If anybody else has encountered this issue I would appreciate hearing about your fix.

    Hate wasting perfectly good parts on some dumb accident like this--a new 32 inch hose is $30 (I've ordered 2 so I have an extra on hand, but I really want to make sure this doesn't repeat).

    Thanks.
     
  2. wirenut

    wirenut Senior Member
    from nh
    Messages: 508

    put a piece of heater hose to protect it .........
     
  3. Megunticook

    Megunticook Senior Member
    from Maine
    Messages: 190

    Good idea, thanks. I know a guy who uses split loom, but heater hose would be even better.

    But is there some way to ensure that the hose never gets caught up under the cylinder like that?
     
  4. YardMedic

    YardMedic PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,266

    Maybe what you were saying about the hose length could have something to do with it. A little longer or shorter could keep it from happening, possibly. My MM2 had the angle hoses zip tied in place, so the plow in the raised position would catch hoses on the front license plate. Since replacing the chafed (& subsequently busted) left hose, eliminating the zip tie allows everything to shift around more freely without hanging.
     
  5. Megunticook

    Megunticook Senior Member
    from Maine
    Messages: 190

    Hmmm...I talked to a Fisher dealer who advised me to zip tie the hoses to the cylinders. Guess maybe that's not the best solution.

    I'm going to replace the chafed 36" hose on the driver side with a 32" and also sleeve the hose with heater hose or something like that...hopefully that will do it. I may also angle those ells upward a bit so the hose rises above the cylinder body.

    Say,,,is there a rule of thumb about replacing hydraulic hoses? I know Gates generally recommends replacing coolant, etc. hoses every 4 years. Same true with hyrdraulic? I'm definitely "an ounce of prevention" type of guy...
     
  6. Megunticook

    Megunticook Senior Member
    from Maine
    Messages: 190

    The more I thought about it the more I liked that idea...simple, cheap, effective, looks good.

    Here's what I ended up with:

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    As you can see, I also angled the ells on the cylinders upward more to route the hoses up and away from the cylinders. This is what I had in years past and I think it makes sense. Also, it appears the shorter hose on the driver side keeps the hose up and out of the way more.

    I do have one question, though. I noticed in the Fisher diagram for older Dodge belt-drive systems it shows a brass ell fitting installed at the quick connect fitting on the passenger side cylinder hose. I figured they must spec that for a reason, possibly to help route that house in such a way to protect it better, so I added an ell. Here's what it looks like now:

    [​IMG]

    Does anybody have a similar setup? My only hesitation is that instead of a nice gentle, even curve on the hose I get more of an S-shape--and I had to fuss with how I threaded the hose into the fitting in the ram to avoid a twist in the hose, since the ends are now in different planes. Seems more stressful potentially for the hose. I'm tempted to get rid of the ell. Comments, anyone?

    Thanks for the help.
     
  7. YardMedic

    YardMedic PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,266

    I think that hose sheath should take any or all natural abuse that's gonna be had out there. 1 question, though: how's the flexibility? Does it flex ok as you raise the blade? (ok, that's 2 questions!)
     
  8. Megunticook

    Megunticook Senior Member
    from Maine
    Messages: 190

    Yeah, it's just heater hose, pretty flexible. I haven't actually raised the thing up yet but working with it during installation it seemed fine.

    So what do you think about the ell question? It's probably fine, just that I've heard in numerous places that if hydraulic hose is twisted, that is bent in more than one plane, it's life span is decreased drastically by 70-90% because the wire mesh is somehow greatly weakened by the tension placed on it.

    I suppose another advantage of the sheathing is less UV degradation of the hose covering--I imagine that's the primary reason the outer jacket on old hoses starts to crack.
     
  9. YardMedic

    YardMedic PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,266

    I have to think that at least half of hose wear is external & due to the elements or chafing. Maybe taking off the heater hose now & then to clean any crap gathered in there will help prevent rot.