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Covered Salt-Outside?

Discussion in 'Ice Management' started by northernsweeper, Oct 14, 2006.

  1. northernsweeper

    northernsweeper Senior Member
    Messages: 397

    Is it a problem to store bulk treated salt outside on the ground, and cover with a tarp? I would be storing it in the country. The ground is all sand. Thanks for any imput..
     
  2. heather lawn spray

    heather lawn spray PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,206

    In some jurisdictions it is now illegal to store salt outside on bare ground. The salt will leech into the ground water contaminating it. Check with your local government on your laws regarding pollution
     
  3. plowin101

    plowin101 Junior Member
    from ohio
    Messages: 21

    I tried that last year, bad idea. Even if you tarp it water will still find its way in causing the salt to leach out. I had a lot of problems with clumping. I have since began construction of a building using a poured concrete floor and 6'x2'x2' concrete blocks. When the walls are finished i will put a tapered roof on it. I will have $7000.00 in the building, but i will have a 200 ton capacity. When its finished i will post pics.
     
  4. NASConst_land

    NASConst_land Member
    Messages: 54

    We used the same concrete blocks to build a bin but just compacted birm on the ground before dumping the salt. We do loose some salt this way, but we just dont scoop all the way to the ground, I guess it would be nice to have concrete under it, just the concrete will crack and crumble in a few years then you are scooping concrete chips into your spreaders. Atleast thats what the guys said around here. I guess you could pave the area.

    We used an old green house frame to cover our bin, and then actually used greenhouse fabric the super thick stuff. We went threw alot of tarps from ripping and stuff like that. But if you can find an old frame it makes for good clearance to get loader in and out of the bin
     
  5. fernalddude

    fernalddude PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,105

    salt storage can be a PITA just some of the regs.....


    Recommended structural criteria for a salt storage pad should incorporate design, construction, impermeability, site drainage, pad elevation, and slope. Evaluation of a proposed salt storage pad location must include an examination of conditions such as topography, hydrology, and soils to determine potential environmental impact on ground and surface waters.

    Design and construction of an asphalt storage area require an adequate pad sub-grade thickness to ensure pad integrity and stability. The pad base and sub-base must be constructed to achieve the highest durability consistent with asphalt construction techniques. This is achieved using a base and/or sub-base composition having an appropriate mixture of coarse aggregate, fine aggregate, and bitumen. Design and construction of an asphalt storage area also require an adequate surface or wear layer thickness to ensure pad impermeability and proper drainage. The pad surface must be constructed to achieve the lowest permeability consistent with asphalt construction techniques. This is achieved using a wear layer composition having an appropriate mixture of fine aggregate and bitumen.

    The pad elevation should be sufficient so that storm water runoff from the adjacent terrain will not run onto the pad. This is typically accomplished by topographic elevation differences, curbs or berms along the edge of the pad, or drainage ditches around the pad perimeter.

    The salt storage pad should have a minimum slope of 0.5% to allow proper drainage of precipitation. This slope may be from end-to-end of the pad. Or, the slope may be along the longitudinal axis of the pad so as to create a "crown," i.e., sloping away from the centerline in opposite directions. The pad slope must be consistent with site-specific salt storage and handling BMPs.

    Recommended non-structural criteria or BMPs for a salt storage pad should incorporate provisions for capacity, working face, and prevailing wind direction. The structural criteria for the salt storage pad require consideration of these BMPs.

    The storage pad size must be adequate to contain the quantity of salt that will be placed at the site. The pad size must also be sufficient to provide for the maneuvering of trucks, loaders, and other equipment.

    The storage pad should be configured so that the working face of the salt stockpile is downwind of the prevailing wind direction. For example, if the prevailing wind direction is from the northwest, the pad should be configured so that the working face is at the southeast end of the stockpile. In addition, and equally important, the working face must be consistent with the pad slope and prevailing wind direction. For the example just cited, the up-gradient pad end would be to the northwest; the down-gradient end would be to the southeast
    Permit(s) and Pollution Prevention Plan

    An operator of a salt storage site should review federal and local environmental regulations to determine potential permit applicability and comply accordingly with any such requirements. Regardless of permit applicability, the operator should implement and maintain a written pollution prevention plan for the salt storage and handling activities. This plan should be based on the protection of ground water, surface water, and air quality. The plan should include structural controls and BMPs.

    Environmental Regulation

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and some State agencies have developed regulations or requirements for salt handling and storage. As noted above, an operator of a salt storage site should review federal and local environmental regulations to determine potential permit applicability and comply accordingly with any such requirements.

    The EPA requirements for salt storage have been promulgated under the Clean Water Act (CWA).9 The CWA regulations contain programs for storm water management.10 Within these programs, EPA has identified storm water provisions for salt storage piles in the General Permit Program for Storm Water Discharges Associated with Industrial Activity11 and in the Storm Water Multi-Sector General Permit Program.12 Both of these permit programs require implementation of select BMPs and development and maintenance of a Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan.
     
  6. DBL

    DBL PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,310

    without regulations youll want to keep as much water out of it as possible also try to contain it as much as possible
     
  7. newlooklandscp

    newlooklandscp Senior Member
    from Midwest
    Messages: 476

    Hey guys approximatley how large of a bin inside dimesions (width, length, and height) do I need to store about 30 tons max? It will be built out of 2x2x4 or 6 ft blocks and asphalt for the base. Thanks
     
  8. heather lawn spray

    heather lawn spray PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,206

  9. Big Dog D

    Big Dog D PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,134



    You would be much better off with an asphalt floor than the concrete.

    I actually made the foundation walls of mine out of pressure treated timbers since they will not be affected by the salt. The bin I had prior to making this was with the 2x2x4 blocks and was approxmately 10 years old and 40% of them were beginning to fail.

    P1240001.JPG
     
  10. crazymike

    crazymike Senior Member
    from Toronto
    Messages: 639

    it really depends how fast you go through the salt. If you are constantly ordering new salt and just using it on a few lots in a storm, you will be okay. You might lose some salt, but you have to weigh how much extra time, fuel and fees you pay to get the salt during a storm.