1. Welcome to PlowSite. Notice a fresh look and new features? It’s now easier to share photos and videos, find popular topics fast, and enjoy expanded user profiles. If you have any questions, click HELP at the top or bottom of any page, or send an email to help@plowsite.com. We welcome your feedback.

    Dismiss Notice

Clutch /slave

Discussion in 'Ford Trucks' started by Clint S, Sep 17, 2009.

  1. Clint S

    Clint S Senior Member
    Messages: 280

    95 f150 4.9L Tell me what I already know. I have no clutch until the bottom inch. It is hard to put in reverse, but you can drive and shift it. I am thinking it is the slave cylinder, because it happened suddenly and there is nothing until the bottom inch. It feels like when a brake line blows and you barely have brakes at the bottom of the pedal. I know the slave is internal but do you have to pull the tranny or can you just slide it back a little to change it. The clutch is not the greatest, but it is just a yard truck so if I could get out of this easy it would be great. I am pretty sure you have to pull it though.
     
  2. B&B

    B&B PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 12,777

    Is it leaking clutch fluid from the bell housing? If not, then the slave is very likely just fine, it's the clutch master that needs attention.

    Mulch easier to change than the internal slave too. wesport
     
  3. Clint S

    Clint S Senior Member
    Messages: 280

    It is not leaking. I took the cap off and it is full. Where is the clutch master it is worth a try. It does not seem that the clutch would be bad right. It just suddenly went out.
     
  4. B&B

    B&B PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 12,777

    It's the component on the firewall that you just checked the fluid level in. Easy to replace..not so easy to bleed.

    download.jpg
     
  5. Clint S

    Clint S Senior Member
    Messages: 280

    Is there a procedure to test this to see if it is bad. I hate to waste $70 and have it be the clutch or the slave.
     
  6. B&B

    B&B PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 12,777

    Have a helper pump the pedal several times through it's full travel and then hold it to the floor. Then, roll under the truck and crack the bleeder screw open on the slave cylinder. If you get no or very little pressure it's a very good bet that the clutch master cylinder isn't producing it.

    And would certainly explain why the clutch "all of a sudden" stopped working correctly, as thats how they react when the clutch master fails.

    Note: when you checked the fluid level you did remember to first remove the bladder from inside the reservoir? That one catches many people...
     
  7. Clint S

    Clint S Senior Member
    Messages: 280

    Yep, I removed the bladder. It looked like it had plenty of fluid in it.. I am pretty sure that it is at the same level as when I checked it last year. I do not see ant leaks under the tranny. I pumped it a bunch of times and the level remained the same. I am assuming the slave bleeder is on the driver side of the tranny. Is it easy to spot?? I will try this weekend. It is not the original slave as I know the clutch and slave have been changed x 2 before this. I am pretty sure the master was changed last time too am not too sure. Do those bleeders ever freeze up like brake ones?? I sure hope I get lucky and it breaks free.
     
    Last edited: Sep 17, 2009
  8. B&B

    B&B PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 12,777

    The bleeder will be protruding from the bell housing right above where the pressure line heads in to meet up with the slave cyl. Should be easy to locate. May still have a rubber cap on the end of it.

    Seldom have an issue with them breaking off due to corrosion since the visible section of the bleeder is just the extended portion of it, the threads themselves are actually in the slave cyl which is reasonably protected from the elements.
     
  9. Clint S

    Clint S Senior Member
    Messages: 280

    Broke the bleeder free it was rusty as everything. I was afraid it would strip out. The wife was not home so I could not test it. I will do it tomorrow morning and post the results. Cross you fingers for a slow dribble please. :0)
     
  10. Clint S

    Clint S Senior Member
    Messages: 280

    Update: I I pumped up the pedal and had my buddy crack the bleeder and it shot out pretty good. Did it again and I had more pedal. We continued to do it and I am back almost the where it started before this, probably 85 % . I popped the inspection boot off and it is a little damp in there. Would I be safe to assume that the slave is leaking a little bit and I got a little air in the line. I will be willing to bleed it out every few weeks as it is just my yard truck. Also is there a way to bleed the master. I want to try that to see if I get any more. I will run it like this if I have to. better than changing a clutch.
     
  11. rofoth6

    rofoth6 Member
    from iowa
    Messages: 67

    I have a 96 f250 5.8 motor. When i changed clutch i changed everything.
    The only way to bleed master is the way you tested to see if fluid was coming out.
    Don't believe everyting you read in the book.
    It took me 3 hours to bleed mine and tjats with help,it just takes 1 little tiny bubble of air to screw things up.
     
  12. B&B

    B&B PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 12,777

    Sounds like it's getting air into the system on the return stroke which isn't all that uncommon. Problem is that it's virtually impossible to tell whether it's the slave or master that's allowing it. Could swap the master as an easier attempt to repair it.

    Your bleeding procedure is good and whether you change the master or not hey can be a real problem to expel all the air from the system...just keep at it until you have a firm pedal.
     
  13. Clint S

    Clint S Senior Member
    Messages: 280

    So I can get air on the return stroke through either??. It is damp down down there by the slave, but it has been for a few years, I know I have a rear main seep. I may just change the slave anyway. I am assuming there is a better chance it is the slave or could it be the master even though that does not appear to be leaking??, but for $50 I may try to change it..
     
  14. rofoth6

    rofoth6 Member
    from iowa
    Messages: 67

    When I changed my clutch ( 96 F250 ) I changed Slave, Line And the Master Cylinder.
    Supposedly the new slave wouldn't match up with the line. Changed the line to match Slave, it wouldn't match Master, Changed the Master. Now everything matches up.With all the changes it took 3 hrs to bleed. ( Helper let up on Peddle just a bit and kept letting air in, But what are Wifes for?) I still prefer theCable throw out compared to Hydrailic.
     
  15. B&B

    B&B PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 12,777

    Yes either components can draw air in around it's seals on the return stoke...and can do so without leaking any visible fluid externally.

    Change the master since it's the least expensive (and easiest) approach and re-bleed the system. If it holds for a long time then you'll know you got it. No point in pulling the trans unnecessarily.
     
  16. Clint S

    Clint S Senior Member
    Messages: 280

    I will have to think long and hard before I pull the tranny. THe truck is a rustbucket and all the bolts holding the trans member in will have to be torched and the braces from the x member to the frame are very rough. By the time I price out all the clutch components and factor in the 2 pounds of rust in my eyes and the time on my back under the truck, I may be better off just buying a 92 to 96 truck for 1500 or so and swap the plow over and keep this for parts.