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cb question ????

Discussion in 'Commercial Snow Removal' started by Scenic Lawnscape, Oct 9, 2003.

  1. Scenic Lawnscape

    Scenic Lawnscape Senior Member
    Messages: 481

    I just bouhgt a cobra ultra 18 and there are 3 wires on the back a black (ground) a red (hot) and a orange (????) Can any tell me what the orange one is. Im trying to get my truck ready before it snow and since i live in michigan that could have been in july since the weather changes her on a daily basis thanks for the help
     
  2. szorno

    szorno Senior Member
    Messages: 308

    On my CB the orange was for a tap into the dimmer system. The idea is tha you can dim the lights on your radio like your dash. I just wired it to the hot. Too much trouble to prowl the dashboard to find a tap point.:rolleyes:
     
  3. digger242j

    digger242j Senior Member
    Messages: 672

    I'm not familar with that particular model, but the last cb I bought had a third wire also. It was supposed to be connected to an unswitched power source, just like the vehicle's clock. The purpose is to keep the radio tuned to the same channel you had it on, since channel switching was electronic, not the old fashioned knob with 40 different positions. If you didn't hook it up to a hot wire the only thing that happened was that whenever you turned the radio on, it was on channel 9.
     
  4. HerkFE

    HerkFE Member
    Messages: 92

    I believe that orange wire is for the illumination. If connected to the panel lighting circuit the cb lights would dim when you dim your panel lights.

    Hope this helps.
     
  5. griffithtlc

    griffithtlc Senior Member
    Messages: 213

    The Orange wire is most likely a "memory" wire. Just like digger said. If you don't hook it up, every time you turn the truck on you will have to reset the channel. If you don't mind this, you have to hook it into the hot wire, or it won't work, that's how it is on mine. I just ran a jumper up into the radio harness, and tapped into the memory wire up there.
     
  6. Scenic Lawnscape

    Scenic Lawnscape Senior Member
    Messages: 481

    thnaks guys
     
  7. Scenic Lawnscape

    Scenic Lawnscape Senior Member
    Messages: 481

    thanks oops
     
  8. Joe92GT

    Joe92GT Member
    Messages: 71

    I just hardwired my CB into a constant +. I can leave it on for like a day before the battey even thinks about getting low. This way, I can have the truck off, and the CB on listening to calls. Just remember to turn it off is all.
     
  9. digger242j

    digger242j Senior Member
    Messages: 672

    Yer weclome. :)
     
  10. wyldman

    wyldman Member
    Messages: 3,265

    The orange wire is for channel memory retention.You can wire it to any constant 12V power source.It is not used for illumination or dimming.
     
  11. Roger Dodger

    Roger Dodger Senior Member
    from nw Pa.
    Messages: 240

    (slightly off-topic here)

    ... and if you want people to hear you, throw away that awful stock mic and get an Astatic, Road King, or Telex noise cancelling type of mic. Stock Cobra mics are only to be recommended to those that you hate and don't want to hear on the Chicken Band. Power mics. will only amplify all the cab and road noise along with your voice. In a mobile environment the noise cancellers are by far the best bet. That radio has plenty of modulation already. Now it just needs a quality audio signal that punches voice frequencies to its mic. circuitry. When it comes to modulation of a radio signal think of it like this:

    It's far easier to notice a blinking, bright lighthouse beam far off shore than it is a steady burning one.

    Same can be applied to mic. audio for communications. Cranking up the modulation kills the wattage swing and now you end up with a steady, high wattage signal that is poorly modulated. Many of those loud truckers and base radios are running low watts with tons of "swing" to the transmitted signal. My radio dead keys at a skimpy 2.5watts but swings to 28 watts! That's the science behind what they are hearing in their speakers when I get a report that "I'm sitting next to them".

    bottom line: many radio butchers out there clipping modulation limiters, tweaking adjustment pots & coils all in the name of "performance tuning" that results in anything but a gain in real performance and money out of your wallet.
     
  12. Joe92GT

    Joe92GT Member
    Messages: 71

    So, how can I tune my cobra GTl 14something to work the best?

    Buy a noise cancelling mic, and then what?
     
  13. Roger Dodger

    Roger Dodger Senior Member
    from nw Pa.
    Messages: 240

    No flame intended, honestly, but I have my doubts that you will know how to effectively tune a radio. There are plenty of CB websites that give mods and tune up procedures however be warmed that a vast majority of them have you doing the same clipping and peaking of circuitry that ends up having you perceive that your radio is now a powerhouse. I would recommend that you talk with another CB'er that has a known good working radio and inquire where he/she took theirs for the tuning. Don't fall in the trap that many truck stops have qualifies CB techs as well. Probably your best bet is to try and locate a commercial or business radio technician and see if he does side jobs. He will have access to professional test equipment that is crucial to a good & proper tuning. "Techies" that use those awful combination CB monitor meters are not doing folks a real justice... just placing garbage on the airwaves instead.

    If your radio is an older style Cobra 142 GTL or 148GTL you have yourself a very fine radio capable of excellent performance when done by a good tech. As long as it doesn't have the trademark label "Nightwatcher/Soundtracker" on the front bezel, you have a real classic that will walk the talk. Those were Cobra's best chassis.... actually made by Uniden for Cobra. The modern Nightwatcher/Soundtracker radios are whimps forced upon us by the FCC guidelines to limit the after sale modifications. Don't let Joe Schmoe mess it up. Used market value for those model Cobras is amazingly high. Those old Cobras and Midlands are easily capable of transmitting several miles and well beyond with a good antenna and proper install. Far beyond the 2-3-4 miles of todays department store crud.