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Cat 226B starter

Discussion in 'Heavy Equipment' started by Laner, Feb 6, 2016.

  1. Laner

    Laner Member
    from IA
    Messages: 63

    I am having trouble with my Cat 226B, the starter gets moisture in it while moving snow. Which then freezes up the starter when parked outside. The solenoid won't turn the starter when this happens. Has anyone else seen this issue? What can I do to combat the moisture issue? I can haul back to shop after each snow storm but prefer to leave it on site for the next snow.
     
  2. johnhenry1933

    johnhenry1933 Senior Member
    Messages: 256

    Never heard of that problem. What applying dielectric grease on the connections inside the solenoid? And then sealing the solenoid to the starter?
     
  3. dieselss

    dieselss PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 10,977

    Are you sure it's frozen?
    Can you just take it off and let it dry for a few days?
    None of our cats ever had this issue btw.....6 of them
     
  4. Laner

    Laner Member
    from IA
    Messages: 63

    The starter clicks and sounds like it is engaging, but won't turn over. If I tap, rather hard, on the starter multiple times and then try starting, it will turn over and start. Almost seems like there is moisture in the bottom of the starter and the tapping breaks the ice enough to get it to turn over. I replaced the starter in Jan 2015 as it was doing the same thing. If the skid sits in a heated (above freezing) area I have no issue with this, which is another reason it seems like there is moisture that gets in the starter and freezes.

    I have had bad starters on other vehicles and know that you can tap on the starter and it will make enough connection to spin the starter again, however this must usually be done with power supplied to the starter at the same time as the tapping.

    I have not taken the starter off to let it dry out. Once I get it started I put it inside for it to 'thaw' out and have no issues. However, if I park it back outside during freezing temps, I have the same issue.
     
  5. dieselss

    dieselss PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 10,977

    Pull it off and see
     
  6. Randall Ave

    Randall Ave 2000 Club Member
    Messages: 2,004

    You have a voltage drop from the cold. This can cause a bad connection in the solenoid. How old are the batteries? Make sure all connections are clean. Including ground connections on engine and frame. Just my opinion.
     
  7. johnhenry1933

    johnhenry1933 Senior Member
    Messages: 256

    This is usually indicative of a bad solenoid. You will see burn marks on the contacts if the amperage draw is low. You may want to check your batteries.
     
  8. Laner

    Laner Member
    from IA
    Messages: 63

    We removed the starter and found no moisture. One connection was not as tight as the other, but still appeared to be making good contact. Battery is just over 1 year old, so I wouldn't think it would be that. Only happens when we have a warm day when snow is melting good, run the machine, park it and temps drop below freezing again.
     
  9. Randall Ave

    Randall Ave 2000 Club Member
    Messages: 2,004

    Replace the solenoid on the starter. If you take it apart you will find the contacts burned.
     
  10. johnhenry1933

    johnhenry1933 Senior Member
    Messages: 256

    I have found new batteries to be bad.

    It is a simple check. Much easier than dropping the starter. Why not just check it and eliminate it?
     
  11. johnhenry1933

    johnhenry1933 Senior Member
    Messages: 256

    I would in this order do the following:

    1: Check all electrical connections from the batteries to the starter. They must be tight, clean and dry. This includes a disconnect if you have one (and damaged wires between starter, battery switch and grounds).

    2: Check amperage of batteries.

    3: Now that you have starter disconnected, check solenoid.

    4: If all of the above proves good, check switch and relay and related wiring and grounds.
     
  12. Laner

    Laner Member
    from IA
    Messages: 63

    Thank!
    I did find a battery cable with a cracked end that attached to the solenoid.
    Battery checked out.
    Solenoid post was loose in the housing, causing bad connection. We replaced the solenoid. While we had the starter off we took it apart and found a spot of red rust, meaning water was entering the starter. We cleaned it up and put it back together. We silicone around the bellows where the fork goes from the solenoid into the starter. Appears to be the only place moisture could be getting into the starter.
    Now that temperature are warm we will most likely have to wait until next winter.
    Thanks again for your help.
     
  13. Randall Ave

    Randall Ave 2000 Club Member
    Messages: 2,004

    The solenoid on the starter was the failure. You'll be fine.