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Calling all welding gurus

Discussion in 'Truck & Equipment Repair' started by k1768, Sep 25, 2015.

  1. k1768

    k1768 Senior Member
    from NJ
    Messages: 490

    For many years I've wanted to learn how to weld. I don't need it often, but there's times it would be good to be able to myself. My plow needs repairs, a local shop gave me an estimate of $300 +tax. What are the odds of a $200-$400 Tractor Supply or Home Depot bought welder and flat stock being able to repair this?
    I'm above average mechanically, can solder electrical and plumbing. Would any of those skills translate to welding?
    I've also been putting off taking my trailer someplace to have d-rings welded on. I'm thinking even if I invest $500 I should be even or ahead just on these two projects.
    I have a basic understanding of the welding process, my big challenge is knowing which type, I need and how much I need to spend. And I've never tried it, only watched it done first hand once about 10 years ago.

    So, what say yous all, should I tackle it myself?

    20150526_183229.jpg
     
  2. grandview

    grandview PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 14,609

    Cut it off and paint and be done with it. Its at the top so it won't effect your plowing.
     
  3. dieselss

    dieselss PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 10,983

    I agree. I did that on a western didn't affect anything.

    How often would you be using the welder?
     
  4. k1768

    k1768 Senior Member
    from NJ
    Messages: 490

    Won't that missing lip reduce the rigidity of the blade?

    In the last 3-5 years I've either farmed out minor welding work or used a different process about the same number of times.
     
  5. dieselss

    dieselss PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 10,983

    The top angle iron is the strength. That "lip" is just the molboard rolled over.

    You could look into mig welders. Typical 110 welders aren't bad, but won't do thicker metal. Then you'd need a 220 welder but those could get pricey.
     
  6. k1768

    k1768 Senior Member
    from NJ
    Messages: 490

  7. k1768

    k1768 Senior Member
    from NJ
    Messages: 490

    Follow up question. If a welder states it's good for 1/8" thick metal, does that mean for both pieces? Meaning could it be used to attach a 1/8" to a 1/4"? I assume not, but checking.
     
  8. flyguyirvin65

    flyguyirvin65 Member
    Messages: 52

    Mig welders are more versatile and easier to use. I bought a 240v mig from Harbor freight tools and very happy with it I welded 1/4 in steel with no problem.
     
  9. k1768

    k1768 Senior Member
    from NJ
    Messages: 490

    I'm seeing some mig will run gas or gassless. Seems like a 140A unit will do 1/4" single pass without an issue. Anything more than that I'd probably want professionally done anyway. They seem to run at the top of my price point for a name brand unit.
     
  10. dieselss

    dieselss PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 10,983

    1/4 is a stretch with 110.
    I never was a fan of just a stick welder. If you need to do thin work, a stick won't work.
    And if it says 1/8 inch, you couldn't weld anything thicker
     
  11. JMHConstruction

    JMHConstruction PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,080

    I second the harbor freight welders. I'm a terrible welder, so maybe I'm a bad example. I have an old Lincoln arc that I picked up on craigslist and a mig from harbor freight. I have the small 110v mig for $90-100. It works good for small stuff, maybe up to about 1/8-3/16". Anything else I use the 220v arc. I make a better weld with the mig (I use fluxcore wire so no gas, but much messier welds) but the arc gets deeper in thick metal. At my skill level, I wouldn't want to weld anything that could put myself or others in danger, but I have more than paid for the welders with things I've fixed and fabricated.
     
  12. BUFF

    BUFF PlowSite Fanatic
    from FR NoCo
    Messages: 7,315

    If you plan to repair this yourself don't get a cheaper Mig Welder and spend the money on a tool that will last you decades. I replaced my 25yr old 110v Hobart with a Lincoln Power Mig 140C. http://www.lincolnelectric.com/en-us/Equipment/Pages/product.aspx?product=K2471-2(LincolnElectric) . Northern Tool has them for under $530.00 with free shipping http://www.northerntool.com/shop/to...ding&utm_campaign=generic&utm_content=lincoln power mig 140c&mkwid=eSbmsG4xs&pcrid=776964285&mtype=e&storeId=6970&langId=-1&type=search . The 140C comes are set up to run gas shielding or flux core wire, they can take a 10# spool of wire, wire size up to .035" and have a great gear drive feed system for the wire. A skilled welder can easily weld up 1/4" steel.
    They're not a 220V machine but probably the best in the 110V class of welders.

    You should PM Dogplow Dodge, he's in Jersey and can pass along some points or even help you out too.
     
  13. k1768

    k1768 Senior Member
    from NJ
    Messages: 490

    The Lincoln is one of the ones I was looking at. The comparable Hobart also. Took a real quick look on CL, not sure I want to go that route though since I know so little about them currently.
    I was kinda counting on Dogplow to chime in here, I looked through some of his posts but didn't see what welder he had.
    As of this moment I think my two options are to trim and paint (gv and ds suggestion) or buy a welder and give it a go.
    Can't justify to myself handing over $300+ to someone to fix something that is debatable if it even needs fixing.
     
  14. BUFF

    BUFF PlowSite Fanatic
    from FR NoCo
    Messages: 7,315

    DP is probably licking himself like Dogs do......... I think he runs a Miller Dual Voltage 110/220.

    Once you buy a quality welder you're skill set will grow quickly because you're no fitting the machine and you'll find yourself doing all kinds of stuff with them from repairs, creating yard art and fab work.
     
  15. k1768

    k1768 Senior Member
    from NJ
    Messages: 490

    That oughta bring him in here :laughing:
     
  16. Dogplow Dodge

    Dogplow Dodge PlowSite Veteran
    from NJ
    Messages: 3,013

    Yup... I know a guy who does some okay welding. He might just be able to help you out.


    BTW, if you want to "learn from a certified welding teacher", let me know He's not terribly far from you, from what I gather.
     
  17. dieselss

    dieselss PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 10,983

    We have the dvi2. Loved it welded thick steel. For thicker we have an older Lincoln stick
     
  18. Dogplow Dodge

    Dogplow Dodge PlowSite Veteran
    from NJ
    Messages: 3,013

    I heard my name, and licking, so I had to tune in....


    I have a Miller 211 autoset. It's excellent at doing both 110v and 220v depending on what you're welding. Can't say enough good things about it, but it is a bit expensive, and just over a grand or so.

    IMO, the last welder I'll buy for a long time. It's so versatile, that I can use it just about anywhere.
     
  19. Randall Ave

    Randall Ave 2000 Club Member
    Messages: 2,015

    Dogplow knows what he's talken bout. The 110 welders are only good for light steel. If your gonna weld on towing D rings you better have a good 220 unit for good penetration. The 110 will never do it. I've got 4 welders, mostly use the systematics 250. Just buy the good welder first time, practice some, you'll be fine.
     
  20. k1768

    k1768 Senior Member
    from NJ
    Messages: 490

    Thanks for the offers DP, I'll keep that in mind. Yeah, a grand is well over what I'm looking to spend. I haven't convinced myself to spend $500 yet.