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cable brakeing

Discussion in 'ATV / UTV Snow Removal' started by nate04, Jan 6, 2010.

  1. nate04

    nate04 Junior Member
    Messages: 4

    do any one know's why my cable keeps snaping on me every time i start to plow?:help:
     
  2. 06Sierra

    06Sierra PlowSite.com Addict
    from Maine
    Messages: 1,329

    The sharp bend in the cable with repeated up and down on the same area is killer for the cables! You could try putting a hook with a puley on the plow and attatching your winch cable to the atv somewhere. I have seen a few guys do this, not sure how much it helps though. The best bet would be to get a new fairlead and some synthetic winch rope. You could also just get a short 7' synthetic for plowing.
     
  3. BruteForce750

    BruteForce750 Senior Member
    from MA
    Messages: 133

    I assume you have the steel cable with a roller fairlead? People have had good success with adding a strap from either a ratchet strap (strap only) or a boat winch strap to the winch and using that instead of the cable.

    The strap allows the weight to be distributed along the larger surface are versus the cable and helps prevent the breaking. I do suggest you replace or file down any burrs your wire strap may have caused on the rollers. Check the mounting plate to see if it has any that may come in contact with the strap or wire too.
     
  4. bigdoug

    bigdoug Member
    from NE Ohio
    Messages: 70

    I put amsteal blue rope on and a aluminum fairlead. The best thing I ever did. No more snaps.

    D
     
  5. bigdoug

    bigdoug Member
    from NE Ohio
    Messages: 70

    By the way you can see in my video (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E1zUbF303dg) that I put a sleeve over the rope. Man was that a mistake. I took the sleeve off the rope and never had a jam up again. These ropes are so hard to cut even with a razorblade.


    D
     
  6. IPLOWSNO

    IPLOWSNO PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,620

    when ya here your winch go annnhnnn, thats as far as it will go, you want to train yourself to see that its visibly up all the way and stop hearing annnhnnn, it will happen occaisionally but alot less imo.pick a point on the frame and take it up to give you a refernce to look at
     
  7. BruteForce750

    BruteForce750 Senior Member
    from MA
    Messages: 133

    Could we potentially get a youtube video of you making the "annnhnnn" noise? I'm having a hard time getting the pitch correct I think....:D


    yes, I often crack myself up..:laughing:
     
  8. IPLOWSNO

    IPLOWSNO PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,620

    atleast you know what the noise means annannn snap wtf,atleast thats how it plays out for me
     
  9. BruteForce750

    BruteForce750 Senior Member
    from MA
    Messages: 133

    Sadly, with the synthetic rope, I usually don't notice until I realize I'm pressing the up button and my plow is not raising :mad:

    I just bought the "Plow roller" which has the larger diameter bottom roller to see if that helps. I currently have on the hawse style fairlead and I think the constant downward pull is generating too much friction.

    Once I get some plowable snow I'll report back with how it does. :nod:
     
  10. Mnflyboy

    Mnflyboy Junior Member
    Messages: 20

    I pulled my cable off and put 10' of hand winch strap on my Rhino. Seems to work real good.

    Jaye(Mn)
     
  11. BruteForce750

    BruteForce750 Senior Member
    from MA
    Messages: 133

    I tried using a strap from a ratchet-strap and snapped that. I think with the roller fairlead it will prevent a majority of the issues I'm having due to friction.
     
  12. Reb

    Reb Senior Member
    from Wyoming
    Messages: 136

    See if this works.
    [​IMG]
    If this works it shows how I solved the problem. Both of my machines are setup this way plus I have several others in the area setup with this without a single failure.
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Jan 8, 2010
  13. BruteForce750

    BruteForce750 Senior Member
    from MA
    Messages: 133

    I myself don't want to run that setup simply because I ride my quad every weekend and still need the functionality of my winch for those times I get a little too stuck :drinkup:

    Thanks for the link as I'm sure others will find it to be helpful.
     
  14. 06Sierra

    06Sierra PlowSite.com Addict
    from Maine
    Messages: 1,329

    With synthetic, or any wire or rope, use a hockey puck, tennis ball, roller from a boat trailer or anything like that. They make good stops so you don't winch in too far.
     
  15. skywagon

    skywagon Senior Member
    Messages: 262

    Very true hockey puck works great but also if using an aluminum or steel fairlead put on the nylon and all cable fraying and snapping is over for good!!!:laughing::laughing:
     
  16. MtnCowboy

    MtnCowboy Member
    Messages: 96

    I went with a system designed for snow plowing and it's been great on a number of fronts. It has front and back receivers w/electrical connections that accept the winch - in a nutshell it was cheaper than going with two winches and it's a matter of removing one pin and plugging, unplugging the electrical leads. The component strictly designed for plowing is the "winch rotator." It connects to the receiver with one pin and the winch connects to it with one pin as well, and bolts are used to stop wobble. The rotator positions the winch so it is directly over the plow; as well, the operator has full view of the winch. I've had no cable breaks and fraying is almost nonexistent. For regular winching the rotator is popped off of the receiver and the winch is inserted.

    winch2.jpg

    winch1.jpg
     
  17. MtnCowboy

    MtnCowboy Member
    Messages: 96

    Correction: "almost nonexistent" - more like minimal fraying.