1. Welcome to PlowSite. Notice a fresh look and new features? It’s now easier to share photos and videos, find popular topics fast, and enjoy expanded user profiles. If you have any questions, click HELP at the top or bottom of any page, or send an email to help@plowsite.com. We welcome your feedback.

    Dismiss Notice

Cab corner repair and bed lined rockers

Discussion in 'Equipment, Tools & Vehicle Pictures' started by Banksy, Feb 16, 2013.

  1. Banksy

    Banksy PlowSite Veteran
    Messages: 3,113

    I completed the passenger side cab corner and rocker lining. The drivers side still needs to be done. The patch on the drivers side will be much bigger than the one on the passenger side. The welding on the passenger side sucked to do and it didn't turn out that great but it will do. My welder is too hot on lowest setting and slowest wire feed. The OEM tin is thin and melts like butter. Any tips or ideas instead of welding? I was thinking of using adhesive and a replacement corner from LMC truck.

    Here's the drivers side as it is now. Welding will suck and make a mess. I'm thinking adhesives?

    [​IMG]

    Here's the patch I made for the passenger side. This was just it's first fit and I used backing strips around the edges to help prevent burn through and strengthen it. Lots of grinding, bending, shaping and tapping into place. It would have been much quicker if these cab didn't have a damn curve to them!

    [​IMG]

    After grinding, filling, sanding, and wet sanding.

    [​IMG]

    Rockers lined all the way to the bottom. Sanded and prepped well.

    [​IMG]


    For you body pro guys, I admit this was no pro job, but it was my first try and this truck (in part) is giving me something to practice on and gain some experience. So don't beat me up too bad!
     
    Last edited: Feb 16, 2013
  2. MajorDave

    MajorDave Senior Member
    Messages: 943

    For the purists...they will always find something wrong - but hell - looks good to me - better than I would have done!
     
  3. xgiovannix12

    xgiovannix12 PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,419

    Nice job !
     
  4. Dogplow Dodge

    Dogplow Dodge 2000 Club Member
    from NJ
    Messages: 2,881

    What type welder ?

    Size wire ?


    You need to use a really thin wire to weld sheetmetal. I'm not a pro, but over the years of tinkering, I've realized that it takes a lot of knowledge.... or just trial and lots of errors... to weld auto sheetmetal well...

    IIRC, it's 23 gauge wire ? I'll have to look at my welder and get back to you on the proper wire size. I just started using a shielded wire welder setup (gas used with mig) and it's awesome compared to the flux core I started off with. Haven't done a lot of work with it, but it's night and day.


    Good job, btw.
     
  5. Banksy

    Banksy PlowSite Veteran
    Messages: 3,113

    Hobart 175 (230v). .030 flux wire. Ya not ideal but it's what I got.

    I saw a video of a guy using adhesive to put on a cab corner. It came out pretty well.
     
  6. CSaley

    CSaley Junior Member
    Messages: 18


    Your welder is perfect, choice of wire, not so much.

    I would go with a 0.023 wire. You should dial it in on a piece of scrap. Also when welding it, you should be using tack welds, working in an "X pattern" (or just going top, bottom, left, right, etc etc) going slowly so you dont warp it. Good luck.

    (not really sure how the flux core stuff will work as ive never used it but im sure it would be fine)
     
  7. Banksy

    Banksy PlowSite Veteran
    Messages: 3,113

    .023 wire.....check. The sheet metal I'm using takes the tack welds pretty well but it's the truck's metal that is being difficult. The OEM metal is even thinner than what patch panels are made out of.
     
    Last edited: Feb 16, 2013
  8. RJ lindblom

    RJ lindblom Senior Member
    Messages: 346

    .023 wire with Co2 and argon gas would be dandy. The Hobart is perfect for this sort of work.
     
  9. Banksy

    Banksy PlowSite Veteran
    Messages: 3,113

    Why does the size wire make a difference? Just curious.

    Edit: Disregard this question. A little google'ing goes a long way.
     
    Last edited: Feb 16, 2013
  10. Dogplow Dodge

    Dogplow Dodge 2000 Club Member
    from NJ
    Messages: 2,881

    I've tried using .030 wire on sheetmetal, with absolutely no luck. The .023 wire with the argon / co2 mix makes me look like a professional welder. :p


    Well, not really, but it came out pretty sweet what little things I've done.

    I made these with my new welder, and IMO, it came out sweet for a guy with minimal welding experience.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]



    They're removable frame strengtheners for my hitch. Dodge frames tend to rip apart under extreme amounts of stress as the lower sector of frame rips apart. with these, the lower / side and top part of the frame are attached together with bolts as one unit, increasing it's stability.
     
  11. Dogplow Dodge

    Dogplow Dodge 2000 Club Member
    from NJ
    Messages: 2,881

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    They're rear "bolt in" frame strengtheners for my hitch. They prevent my hitch from "ripping out the lower section of the c channel if I overload the hitch.
     
  12. Banksy

    Banksy PlowSite Veteran
    Messages: 3,113

    Cool! Looks good.
     
  13. Banksy

    Banksy PlowSite Veteran
    Messages: 3,113

    When you say co2 and argon. Is that one mixed bottle of the two? I have the line and gauge for my welder to accept a bottle.
     
  14. RJ lindblom

    RJ lindblom Senior Member
    Messages: 346

    Generally the mix is 75% argon and 25% CO2. It comes in one bottle. the Argon mix is best for thinner metals, like sheet metals. Straight CO2 offers better penetration.
     
  15. sno commander

    sno commander PlowSite.com Addict
    from ct
    Messages: 1,061

    when i did the cab corners on my dump truck i bought the lmc replacments, they worked preety well i just picked a spot and cut the coner clean off. your welder is great for body work, i personally use .30 wire with 75/25 gas mix. make sure you have enough wire speed, if your heat is down all the way along with your wire you still will burn hot, try turning your wire up and keep your heat low. :mechanic:
     
  16. Morrissey snow removal

    Morrissey snow removal PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,799

    nice job came out good
     
  17. L.I.Mike

    L.I.Mike Senior Member
    Messages: 364

    Looks good.
     
  18. birddseedd

    birddseedd PlowSite Veteran
    Messages: 3,516

    nice job. im just going to say screw it and save up for a new body. only need 3 doors, hood. cowel and seal under hood. box and tailgate.
     
  19. BUFF

    BUFF PlowSite Fanatic
    from FR NoCo
    Messages: 7,213

    Welding solid wire with Argon/Co2 mix give you a much cleaner weld and less clean up.
    Make sure the areas you're welding are clean, Flux Core wire you can get away with less prep.

    Flux Core wire penetrates more than solid wire when using the same settings on the welder.

    You mentioned buying panels from LMC, do it there stuff is good and saves so much time.
    I've been doing some floor pan patching on a K-5 Blazer of mine and used LMC panels.I used my small welder with .023" solid wire with gas. When welding sheet metal I "stitch weld" , running a continuous bead builds too much heat and the metal warps.
    It's just takes practice to get the hang of welding sheet metal and knowing the do's and dont's.
    I will say, being you first go at sheet metal work you've done a nice job and a few more panels you should have it dialed in.Thumbs Up
     
  20. RJ lindblom

    RJ lindblom Senior Member
    Messages: 346

    Flux is also handy if your're welding outside. It depends on the application.

    In this case, the outcome was excellent. Nicely done.