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By the inch

Discussion in 'Bidding & Estimating' started by badger, Oct 31, 2007.

  1. badger

    badger Junior Member
    from Maine
    Messages: 13

    just looking for some input on charging by the measured inch compared to by the inch of water content.
     
  2. powerjoke

    powerjoke PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,341

    ?huh:confused:
    there is aprox 10" of snow to 1" of rain or 8" of heavy snow to 1" of rain is that what you mean
     
  3. JD Dave

    JD Dave PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 11,046

    Where do you get your numbers from, I have never heard of that. Sounds about right though.
     
  4. badger

    badger Junior Member
    from Maine
    Messages: 13

    what i mean is we might get a wet snow that stick measures 4 inch with a water content measuring 8 inches. you also could get 14 inches of powder snow with a water content of 1 or 2 inches
     
  5. powerjoke

    powerjoke PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,341

    i think we're reading too much into it i would just charge on acumulative, i maybe wrong but i dont think your going to only get 4" of any type of snow out of 8" of rain?

    if it were the other way around it would mean a gal of snow weighed 16lb

    JD i don't know where i heard that but i have always kinda thought it was a general to go by?
     
  6. JD Dave

    JD Dave PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 11,046

    That's too complicated, you charge by the measured inch. Sometimes you win, sometimes you lose.
     
  7. Clapper&Company

    Clapper&Company PlowSite Veteran
    from NE OHIO
    Messages: 4,413

    I like to use this

    20_inches_of_snow.jpg
     
  8. grandview

    grandview PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 14,609

    The only think I'd pay by the inch is a Sub.Dam Sabres!:realmad:
     
  9. SnoFarmer

    SnoFarmer PlowSite Fanatic
    from N,E. MN
    Messages: 8,549

    He means it is harder to push an inch of very heavy snow compaired to a inch of very light snow as they would have diffrent water content.

    We do not charge by the inch or weight.;)
    We service/plow 3, 24hr restaurants all of them have a 2inch trigger. their will never be more than 2 inches in the lots.

    Some are 1 inch trigers, one is no tollarence.
     
  10. JD Dave

    JD Dave PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 11,046

    Good to know. Thanks
     
  11. QuadPlower

    QuadPlower PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,056

    I heard 1" rain makes 4"-6" of snow.

    I understand what you mean by less height, but heavy snow and more height with light snow. Maybe there needs to be a universal measureing device. (not a tape measure) Like a jar. Fill it with snow, let it melt, and then charge by the liquid that is in there. Just kidding.

    You win with the deep light and you "break even" with the shallow heavy.
     
  12. badger

    badger Junior Member
    from Maine
    Messages: 13

    no joke that is pretty much how its done . the local water district measures it. they do a stick measure and a moisture content. i use the standard stick measure. others in my area prefer the moisture or water content. we are in an area by the coast where some storms draw warmer air into the storm causing the snow to become heavy. we call it mashed potato snow. i know that 4-5 inches of wet heavy snow can push mean but 12 plus inches of powder can be a pain in the---- to chase around. as i said i use the stick measure method. it all evens out in the end. thanks guys
     
  13. bribrius

    bribrius PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,609



    okay. i dont get it.
    im from maine too. i just dont understand the by inch theory. no one really seems to know exactly how much we get here when we get snow. we have a drift over there of 19 inches and over here only four inches. some of these storms we get its just hard to tell. i could have ten inches in my driveway give or take a couple but at my friends place two miles from here he could have twelve or more. please explain because im at a loss. even on the weather reports and when i look up results online after a storm they dont match up with what i can drive around and measure. all i can comes close to guaranteeing is if its a two inch trigger i can pretty much say we have more than two inches if im walking around through eight.
    and that doesnt even factor in sleet or freezing rain. ten inches can turn into six after its pelted with sleet and freezing rain for a hour.
     
  14. powerjoke

    powerjoke PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,341

    bri i understand about the drifts i wonder if anyone else in main(OR ANYWHERE) has ever heard of this
     
  15. bribrius

    bribrius PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,609



    i wasnt joking power joke i really dont understand. i dont get it.
    charging by the inch i could see as long as you are using a broad range like maybe the intial trigger (and even that can be argued). but i think some people are trying to do it like its a science. when whatever your measurment is may be different a couple feet over or may be different than it was a hour before or a half hour after. i just dont see any accuracy in it at all. ive tried it. it doesnt work. i can come up with more than ten measurements all in one little driveway. and ten more for the same driveway a hour before that one or a hour after depending on wind and sleet or rain. i just dont get it. the weather reports dont even know how much fell. no one really seems too. look at the reports then walk outside and start measuring. you will have different numbers. and it changes from area to area. the parking lot across the street could have two more inches. t-man touched on this once in a previous post and i remember him stating something about using a source as a tool for establishing per inch. even that could not be right though. you could shove the tape measure in the ground at your feet and come up with a different number. im a bit confused. :help:
     
  16. powerjoke

    powerjoke PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,341


    no don't get me wrong i don't understand either:dizzy: i think it's B/S (the whole thread) but i don't live in maine. maybe....there is NO drifts andNO obstructions to deflect the snow's path and maybe just maybe its the only place on EARTH that snow is heavier than water...... i wonder why it is white surely it's not traped air?
     
  17. SnoFarmer

    SnoFarmer PlowSite Fanatic
    from N,E. MN
    Messages: 8,549

    bribrius,
    How do you know when it's time to plow?
    When your trigger depth has been reached, right.

    Kind of like plowing by the inch and you still need to mesure it for the per-push methoud.
    Sooooo,
    Now ,by your last posts it sounds like you are going to have a hard time determinging this.
    How do you do it?
    ---------------------------------
    -powerjoke,
    "i wonder why it is white surely it's not traped air?"

    lol;) http://www.discovery.com/area/skinnyon/skinnyon971003/skinnyon.html
     
  18. badger

    badger Junior Member
    from Maine
    Messages: 13

    i get my measurements on the national weather sevice site for this area and the water district. snowfall is measured by the hour. if it turns to rain you still have a pretty close figure. i think snowfarmer knows what i mean. it might be to complicated for some others.
     
  19. bribrius

    bribrius PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,609


    because i see zero tolerance and i see 3-5 inches. im not specific. i walk through it and figure its time to plow. if its up to my knees i figure im running behind schedule. lol :dizzy:
     
  20. QuadPlower

    QuadPlower PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,056

    This has nothing to do with commercial lots. That can be billed at a different price for different depths for the fact that you have to push the rows from one side to the other. By the time you get done, you could be pushing a lot of snow.

    For residentials. I look at a driveway and I look at my truck and I don't really care how much snow falls, my truck can handle it. Be it 2" or 12" Any thing over that and I should have been there sooner. So every drive gets a flat rate based on time to plow X hourly rate.

    With my City sidewalks they have a 2" trigger. I get to the first spot that has a tendency to blow the snow off of the sidewalk. (Highway over pass) If I walk it and my boots are kicking snow, I drop the blade and go. If it is a question about maybe not being enough. I drive to another location and look. Judgement call.