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Burning Oil?

Discussion in 'Ford Trucks' started by wavemaster, Jan 18, 2004.

  1. wavemaster

    wavemaster Junior Member
    Messages: 11

    Plowed for almost 6 hrs today and got a little bit sick to much stomach from the small in the cabin. Someone who stuck his head through the window smelled something and asked burning oil.
    My truck has only 49,000 miles on it and I don't seen any evidence of oil use (engine/trans). I am using a little bit of cooling fluid.

    Is there something obvious I am overlooking, like a disconnected hose somewhere?

    thanks in advance.

    Robertjavascript:smilie(':help:'):help:
     
  2. The Boss

    The Boss 2000 Club Member
    Messages: 2,099

    Check all your gaskets, especially the valve covers.:waving:
     
  3. MickiRig1

    MickiRig1 PlowSite Veteran
    Messages: 3,617

    I have never owned a Ford truck yet that did not leak oil when hot at the rocker covers. I been wrenching with Dad,
    on FORDS for 30 years. It don't matter the miles, gaskets age fast with the heat of plowing. Look for leaks, after plowing pop the hood at the gas station and look for light smoke coming from the engine. Look at power steering hoses.
    Look for wet tracks of fluid down the motor sides and ash etc around the heads. They probably just need the cover bolts tightened. Be cool if you do it your self, it don't take much to break a valve cover bolt off. Snug it, not all you got. Make sure your transmission dip stick is in all the way each time too. Many a truck fire has been started by trans fluid "burping" onto the exhaust manifold.
     
  4. MickiRig1

    MickiRig1 PlowSite Veteran
    Messages: 3,617

    Oh, I forgot to add.
    Roll under truck with a creeper and make sure you have no exhaust leaks or broken pipes. This can cause smoke in the cabin too.
     
  5. Eyesell

    Eyesell 2000 Club Member
    Messages: 2,101

    Stupid question, but what year truck and style is it :dizzy: :dizzy:
     
  6. wavemaster

    wavemaster Junior Member
    Messages: 11

    Oops

    5.0 L 1991 F150 with AUTO:blush2:
     
  7. MickiRig1

    MickiRig1 PlowSite Veteran
    Messages: 3,617

    Like I said roll under and look at the underside of the truck. I have to tighten the bolts on my transmission pan ( c-6 ) a couple of times for some reason. I use a torque wrench so I know they were tight the last time I did it. Keep checking all your fluids too. It's got to be a leak somewhere hitting the exhaust system or an exhaust leak. You start getting really tired or weak or nausea or dizzy driving you probably have an exhaust leak. Get fresh air and get it fixed.
     
  8. Plow Meister

    Plow Meister PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,174

    If you are not noticing any oil being burnt or you are not using any oil, here are 2 other things I could suggest.

    1. If you run the heater on the floor full blast on the hottest position for long periods of time, it can start to cook cheap floor mats.

    2. How is your cooland level? Could it not be oil and maybe coolant from the heater core?
     
  9. wavemaster

    wavemaster Junior Member
    Messages: 11

    Coolant?

    I am loosing coolant, so far I have thought that this was because of high coolant temps. Going uphill with the plow raises the coolant temp to 240 on a JCWhitney gauge. That is probably pretty close to boiling point in a pressurized system. So I thought I was loosing coolant there.

    I loose around half a quart over period of 6 hrs of plowing and going back and forth between home and plowsite.

    Suppose it is coolant, what is the best way to determine where I loose it? There are no obvious wet spots underneath or inside engine bay.

    Thnx in advance for all your help.

    Robert
     
  10. Plow Meister

    Plow Meister PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,174

    Check under the dash around the drivers side. No luck there, you may be weeping from the small hole under the water pump pulley. This may not be very noticeable. Look for corrosion or discoloration near the weep hole. Once the coolant hits a hot engine it will almost immediately evaporate, leaving little trace of a leak. If the weep hole is leaking, it is time for a new water pump. No biggie. My guess it is probably the heater core or a connection to the core.
     
  11. MickiRig1

    MickiRig1 PlowSite Veteran
    Messages: 3,617

    Make sure you have a coolant recovery tank too. Check the hose on it too, they tend to go bad and leak. LOOK at the system closely under pressure I have seen pin hole leaks that can spray a 3 foot stream you can barely see. If you have A/C the heater has a drain line out of the bottom and sometimes it's hard to find the "dripper"
     
  12. Eyesell

    Eyesell 2000 Club Member
    Messages: 2,101

    apply a little lock-tite to the bolts, if they keep coming lose this may buy ya a few extra months . :nod:
     
  13. MickiRig1

    MickiRig1 PlowSite Veteran
    Messages: 3,617

    HEY I got 3 flavors of lock tight. I think it will not work with the transfluid being involved. I did use it on the bolts I use it on everything. Even got new lock washers when I changed the filter and fluid. I think it's the heat / chill cycle it goes thru with plowing and weather. Just one of those hummm, why the hell? things
     
  14. wavemaster

    wavemaster Junior Member
    Messages: 11

    Burning Oil? (update)

    Thanks for all your suggestions.

    Today I checked the valve cover bolts, and the ones I could reach were finger tight or less.
    The hole through the firewall for the plow controls is 4" away from the rear end of the valve cover.

    Tomorrow I will know if it did the trick>

    Robert
     
  15. MickiRig1

    MickiRig1 PlowSite Veteran
    Messages: 3,617

    Like I said in the one post, be cool tightening rocker cover bolts it's easy to snap one off.
    Change the PCV too it might be causing engine to have a higher internal pressure if it's not working right. That will force oil out too.
     
  16. streetsurfin'

    streetsurfin' Senior Member
    Messages: 770

    After you fix the leaks, put some sealer in any holes that pass the plow controls and wiring into your cab. I used some clay like putty found in the electrical dept. at H. D. I've heard it called dum-dum, dont recall its actual name.
     
  17. juggernaut

    juggernaut Member
    Messages: 84

    MickiRig try using those lock washers that look like little turbine compressor wheels. I dont know what the hell they're called. They work best with the stamped steel covers. We use them for the gear covers on Toro Spartan reel mowers (the kind you pull behind a tractor) never had one come loose so far.