1. Welcome to PlowSite. Notice a fresh look and new features? It’s now easier to share photos and videos, find popular topics fast, and enjoy expanded user profiles. If you have any questions, click HELP at the top or bottom of any page, or send an email to help@plowsite.com. We welcome your feedback.

    Dismiss Notice

Building a spreader.

Discussion in 'Ice Management' started by Purple, Sep 22, 2002.

  1. Purple

    Purple Junior Member
    from Quebec
    Messages: 9

    I am trying to build a salt/sand spreader that will fit in the back of my truck.I have all the material to build one,just lacking the plans.I have sheets of steel,chain,B&S moter,hydrolic pump and moter.
    I was searching the net and found this place,great looking place,hope to be a regular here.
    What I need is the gear ratio for the spinner,conveyor and any plans etc.
    Or does anybody know where I can purchase a spreader here in Canada.Thanks in advance.:waving:
     
  2. CT18fireman

    CT18fireman Banned
    Messages: 2,133

    I cut down a spreader once to make it fit in a 6ft bed before they made 6 ft spreaders. This was quite a task. I think it would be a lot of work to set up everything just to build one spreader.

    Anyone that sells plows should be able to get you a spreader made by the same company. If not they can be ordered online or by phone from many companies.
     
  3. Purple

    Purple Junior Member
    from Quebec
    Messages: 9

    Thanks CT18fireman,I will try and purchase one but they are hard to find.If I can't find one I will try and make one.It wil be hard work I know,but I like the challenge,kinda like those guys on the show junkyard wars,or Red Green.:D :D :drinkup: :help:
     
  4. dave-man

    dave-man Junior Member
    Messages: 19

  5. Alan

    Alan PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,393

    Purple,

    I can't believe it's that hard to find a spreader up there. Where are you located in Quebec? I'm assuming you are referring to Quebec Province and not the city.

    I'm relatively competent with metalwork and mechanical components and I see building a spreader as a very major undertaking. I have plans to build one myself, but that is because it will be going on a custom plow rig and there is nothing commercially available that will be just what I want. I'm sure that it will end up costing far more than any commercial unit of the same capacityand that doesn't include a lot of hours of labor.
     
  6. Purple

    Purple Junior Member
    from Quebec
    Messages: 9

    Thanks everyone.
    Alan,I'm from the northern part of the province,very remote.Yes I found one company selling them for $4000.00 each.That price plus the taxes and freight to get it shipped in here,I would say I'm looking at a total of anywhere from $6000.00 to $8000.00.
    I have already all the material and equipment,so you can see my reason to want to build one.Would it be possible for you to fax me your plans?Thanks
     
  7. Alan

    Alan PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,393

    I'd be happy to fax you my plans, if I had any. Like most of my projects this one is strictly in my head. What I'm hoping to end up with is a hopper that is wider and shorter than factory ones, and split across the length to make two compartments. Unloading will by by auger rather than chain, with two augers, operating independantly so that I can unload either compartment. My reasoning for the unusual arrangement is so that I can carry either salt and sand at the same time and use whichever is required by a given site. Optionally I could carry the same material in both compartments and unload the rear first to keep the truck in a little better balance.

    What's your travel distance to the Montreal area? Your snow season must not be too far away at this time.
     
  8. Purple

    Purple Junior Member
    from Quebec
    Messages: 9

    WOW,that would be quite the setup.
    What I am most concerned about is the gear ratio for a 10 hp BS motor to run the conveyor and spinner.
    After a short airplane ride and if I drove non stop and didn't get stopped by the cops (again):eek: :eek: I would arrive in Montreal after a 16 hour drive.I figure I have about 2 to 2 1/2 months before we get enough snow to be a problem.
     
  9. Pelican

    Pelican 2000 Club Member
    Messages: 2,075

    Purple, if you're planning to use a pony motor, why not make it direct drive instead of going the hydraulic route? I think it would be less complicated and more efficient.

    Torwell uses a 10 horse Briggs to run their sander, and they have a gear reduction unit like you speak of. Perhaps you could get the gear unit from them and mimic their design.
     
  10. CT18fireman

    CT18fireman Banned
    Messages: 2,133

    Most spreaders are powered by 8.5 and 10.5 hp motors. The HP of the motor is not as critical as the rpm range and gearing. The reduction rate of the gear box is to get the conveyor and spinner running at a good ratio. This way the amount of material delivered can be thrown different distances depending on engine speed. The feedgate allows further control of material. If you can get all the mechanical parts then I would think that building the hopper would be an involved but not really difficult project. I would still try to buy one though. Even if I had to make a long drive I think it would still be beneficial. If you could get to New Hampshire then you would not even have to pay tax.

    Alan that sounds like a neat setup. I wonder why it has not been thought of before. Maybe it has but I do not know of it being built. I would love to see that plan come true.
     
  11. THREE W

    THREE W Senior Member
    Messages: 122

    Alan,

    What your describing sounds almost like a wheat combine's
    bulk tank. Most have two turning auger's inside the tank but
    have one joint auger to empty.

    Size would be almost right, most are about 6-8' wide and about the same front to back, and about 4 feet deep. The only difference is they are not split in half.

    One used parts place here has 100's of old combines sitting around with augers......hmmmm. Wheels are turning!!!
     
  12. Pelican

    Pelican 2000 Club Member
    Messages: 2,075

    The neat thing I see about Alan's idea is given the proper design, he can custom blend the mix to each customers liking and conditions, like a 80/20 mix or 60/40, etc. Alan, you better get some plans drawn and off to the patent office!
     
  13. Alan

    Alan PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,393

    I primarily use salt, but some sections of the route have gravel, residential drives mied in with commercial, blacktop surfaces. One site is even aprtly paved and partly gravel, specs call for salt on pavement and sand on the gravel. This currently requires two trips to deal with it correctly.

    As for custom mixing, that would require a bunch of extra plumbing to allow adjusting rates on each auger. As it is a diverter valve will allow selecting either auger. with feed flow coming off a standard hydraulic spreader control.

    I'm hoping to build this rig over the winter, if snow revenues allow. The idea is to use a shortened chassis, looking for about a 100-110" wheelbase. I was going to use a pickup cab but now I'm leaning towards a van cab section. That would allow for a little more room for the spreader without increasing the wheelbase. I've got all the drivetrain components and a truck frame and cab, but I am going to start looking for either a 3/4 or 1 ton van so I can do some measuring and see if I can make it work.

    Back to Purple's project, i tend to think that it would be easier to set the whole thing up to drive hydraulically. No gears to worry about, mount a spreader control on the unit, protected in some manner of enclosure. It should be possible to run the pump off your small engine with an electric clutch to start and stop spreading. With the chain speed regulated off the spreader control you could eliminate any need for a feed door.

    I've never seen a gas drive spreader that really let you vary spread rates and widths very well. The one exception to that might be a Torwell, which lets you adjust spinner speed relative to chain speed. I used a Torwell for a couple years but it was in pretty sad shape and didn't make a good test bed to form an opinion on.
     
    Last edited: Sep 24, 2002
  14. Purple

    Purple Junior Member
    from Quebec
    Messages: 9

    I was wondering about using a old snowblower for the spinner.Remove the motor, handles and shute.Open up the snow exit more and turn in on its back,let the sand from the conyver fall into the augers and down to the spinner.I could power it with a gas motor or a hydraulic motor. Or maybe I should remove the augers too.
    Do anyone think that will work.
     
  15. karl klein

    karl klein Senior Member
    Messages: 557

    it might work' but i dought you will end up with a spreader you like in the end. i really think you should look at buying a v box.
     
  16. Eager Beaver

    Eager Beaver Senior Member
    Messages: 104

    I have a old boss spreader with a briggs engine that I would let go for $300.00. It needs a chain, bearings and is pretty rusty however you may scavange parts for your design. Were located in Michigan if that would help. It has the clutch assembly,spinner gearbox etc. In fact with sandblasting and paint job, new chain and bearings you could use it as is. Engine will run however I would replace it. It is a Boss salter aproximate year 1994 which was made by Henderson. A contractor owed me some money and dropped it off.