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broken boss

Discussion in 'Equipment, Tools & Vehicle Pictures' started by OakhillsSnowdiv, Jan 1, 2009.

  1. OakhillsSnowdiv

    OakhillsSnowdiv Member
    from mass
    Messages: 75

    here are some pics of my biggest regretable purchase hahaha i used to love this plow, but this is the 5th time we have had to unbolt it and reweld it because the boss dealer wont touch it luckly my father is a welder by trade and has a degree in metalurgy hopefully this doesnt happen again this season damn man hole covers

    Picture 010.jpg

    Picture 014.jpg

    Picture 012.jpg
     
  2. The pictures are kinda blurry. What broke on it? The blade or a-frame?

    Sorry to hear man. Happens to the best of us. It sucks!
     
  3. OakhillsSnowdiv

    OakhillsSnowdiv Member
    from mass
    Messages: 75

    A frame at the bottom of the plow snapped
     
  4. 2low

    2low Member
    Messages: 56

    our 9'2" boss v blade keeps brakeing at the neck too
     
  5. topdj

    topdj Senior Member
    Messages: 396

    Are you grinding out a v in the weld joint on both sides of the weld?
    How about preheating the steel and keeping it from cooling too fast. Have you tried using a sheilding gas weld.. I fear the metal has become brittle in that area. And the problem will just get worse.
     
  6. 2low

    2low Member
    Messages: 56

    yes its been ground out to a v gas has been used its at the tip right after the pivot pin is if it brakes again were just going to get a new lower frame
     
  7. topdj

    topdj Senior Member
    Messages: 396

    well that sucks , they should give it to you at cost, I been told that heating the frame before welding it the first time might have kept it from getting brittle. Maybe a welding pro will chime in.
     
  8. RBRONKEMA GHTFD

    RBRONKEMA GHTFD 2000 Club Member
    Messages: 2,592

    I agree 100%. For roughly 400 bucks or so I would just go buy a new A-frame. The time you spend re-welding it isn't worth it in my book. Personally if it was mine I would of just replaced it in the first place.
     
  9. OakhillsSnowdiv

    OakhillsSnowdiv Member
    from mass
    Messages: 75

    we used 7018 stick its stronger then shielded gas i may just buy a new a frame next year or just junk the plow and buy a fisher hahaha one or the other
     
  10. xtreem3d

    xtreem3d PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,548

    i'm by no means a professional welder but i have gone to the 7014 rods, i really don't know eactly what they are primarily for, but my welds have been the strongest i have ever had since switching...hope a pro chimes in also
     
  11. Johnnay Boy91

    Johnnay Boy91 Member
    from MASS
    Messages: 40

    yea i work at a boss dealer and have seen this alot one reason i will never buy one they are great plows when there arnt broken, fixed one last week with a broken a-frame got another to fix tomro morning also fixed 2 plows with the center pin falling out and bending thats a fun fix lol i dont see why the boss dealer wont tuch it? also weld 1/4" steel plates on the side over the weld to make it stronger hope this helps and good luck
     
  12. bad93blaster

    bad93blaster Member
    Messages: 62

    thats what i was thinking
     
  13. OakhillsSnowdiv

    OakhillsSnowdiv Member
    from mass
    Messages: 75


    the place we got it from wont replace the frame for free so we wont bother with them thats all, when we pulled it apart the first time it broke we noticed that the inside channels that sit in towards the head of the pin werent welded in there or anything they were just sitting there. we welded them in this time this is the third time its snapped the last two times we just rewelded the break and never beefed it up cause of time so this time we beefed it up hopefully it stays
     
  14. Doakster

    Doakster Senior Member
    from Maine
    Messages: 650

    There is not much difference by design of 7018 and 7014 other than the coating type. For example they both have a tensile strength of 70,000psi (that's the 70), they both are good for all positions of welding (that's the 1) and the only difference is the coating with which is related to what current the rod can be welded with.

    The Last digit of 8 indicates = AC or DC:ROD+, iron powder low hydrogen coating
    The Last digit of 4 indicates = AC or DC:ROD- or DC:ROD+, iron powder titania Potassium
     
  15. Krieger91

    Krieger91 Senior Member
    Messages: 353

    If that's how the numbering system works why does welding with something like 6010 or 6018 (I don't remember which of those is correct) seem more difficult than 7018?
     
  16. Johnnay Boy91

    Johnnay Boy91 Member
    from MASS
    Messages: 40

    yea in my opinion sell the plow and buy a fisher or blizzard 810 and yea we wouldnt replace it for free either but i dont see why thats shouldnt snap like that
     
  17. Doakster

    Doakster Senior Member
    from Maine
    Messages: 650

    The numbering system doesn't really tell you how "easy" the rod will be to weld. I do know what you mean as far as 7018 being easier to weld, in general it's easier to hold an arc and weave with 7018. I'm not 100 percent sure but in general I think it has something to do with the fact 7018 is a very low hydrogen flux. 6010 is generally used for root passes that required deeper penetration, the rod diameters are also usually smaller. A 6010 root pass followed by 7018 cover passes is very common.

    7018 is really the standard in structural welding for it's strength and versatility.
     
  18. Turbodiesel

    Turbodiesel Senior Member
    Messages: 428

    Oakhill , try to post more pictures of the repaired area.

    I d like to beef mine up too.