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Brick Plaza

Discussion in 'Ice Management' started by BiggBilly, May 16, 2007.

  1. BiggBilly

    BiggBilly Junior Member
    from Mass
    Messages: 5

    I have charge of clearing and making safe a 13 acre brick plaza in Boston Ma. For years we used sand/salt mix after plowing to get down to the brick and make a safe walking surface for pedestrians. It was determined by engineers that the salt in this mix has had an adverse effect on our surface and subterranian concrete so we have had to change over to a ice melt product (Superior) and "no use of sand or salt." The ice melt works well on storms where the weather warms up after the storm, but when we get a quick freeze after the storm as is frequently the case in New England, ice forms quickly and freezes the ice melt right along with everyting else and leaves us with a slippery ice condition on the bricks. I have asked to use just sand to provide for an anti-slip situation until the weather warms and the ice melt can continue it's work, but management does not want to use "just sand" either. Do you folk have any solution in mind that could help?

    Thanks,

    Bill
     
    Last edited: May 16, 2007
  2. chim

    chim Junior Member
    Messages: 4

    Bill,

    It sounds to me like you may be using the wrong product. What is the active ingredient in the ice melt product your using? I would recommend a Calcium/Magnesium blend. the Calcium will fast (but short lived) results and the magnesium will provide for residual melting ability and both products will work down to - 25 degrees or better. Salt/Sand will only melt down to about 20 degrees and the sand just makes a mess. Sand, for the cost and actual benefit compared to clean up cost is not a cost effective solution in my opinion.
     
  3. Mark Oomkes

    Mark Oomkes PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 10,853

    Sounds like you're using potassium chloride. There's numerous 'concrete friendly' products out there. I use quotes because after doing some reading, at this point in time, I have no clue which claims are true regarding these products and the harm caused to concrete. I will say, that salt has been getting used on concrete for a long, long time with what appears to be very little damage in the long run.

    Try a search, there's a thread on this subject that was running not too long ago.

    You might want to look into a liquid such as Magic or potassium acetate to prevent damage. I can vouch for the potassium acetate AKA NC3000 and other names, but that's the one I use.
     
  4. BiggBilly

    BiggBilly Junior Member
    from Mass
    Messages: 5

    Ice Melt

    Thanks guys, the problem is the sand keeps people from falling, one $50,000 law suit would pay for a lot of sand and sweeper cleanup. I'll give the Calcium Magnesium a look.

    Thank you,

    Bill
     
  5. SnowMelt2006

    SnowMelt2006 Member
    Messages: 68

    If the product you are using is Superior Sno N Ice melt produced by CP Industires, then it is a heavy % salt blend.

    Just a FYI.
     
  6. Mark Oomkes

    Mark Oomkes PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 10,853

    Melting the snow and ice will also keep (most) people from slipping as well. And it won't clog the storm sewers with sand, either. Or create airborne pollutants. Or disposal problems.

    Just a thought.
     
  7. BiggBilly

    BiggBilly Junior Member
    from Mass
    Messages: 5

    Sup

    Yes I tried to tell them the Superior was mostly salt, but that is what they want. The reason they wanted to stop the salt/sand mix was explained as the salt may not act on the concrete but diluted salt/melt water is eating the subterrainean rebar in the concrete. I mentioned the Superior was about the same but their mind was made up. I've read about the calcium/magnesium stuff as well, it all states it is corrosive to metals. I don't know what to do, I just don't want people to fall down. We used aboout 4 times the ice melt we would normally, it just burns through to the brick and still leaves a slipery walking surface, I don't see how to get out of using sand for anti-slip.

    Bill