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brake upgrade anyone?

Discussion in 'Ford Trucks' started by plowzilla, Nov 22, 2015.

  1. plowzilla

    plowzilla Senior Member
    Messages: 289

    Yooooo, I have a 2010 F-250, 6.8L. Just wondering if anyone has done a brake upgrade on there trucks and how you liked it, also, what brakes did you go with?
    The reason I am asking, my truck loaded with salt and the plow is quite heavy, obviously increasing my braking distance. Not that it all that bad, I just prefer them to be better. Thanks in advance
     
  2. immortal.ben

    immortal.ben Member
    Messages: 65

    For the best results to your query, I suggest you head over to Ford Truck Enthusiast forums. Find the section particular to your truck and run a search. The subject has been covered completely, I assure you.

    The general consensus is either Hawk or EBC. I have run both and either is a significant upgrade over stock. I currently run EBC pads and rotors.

    The BEST upgrade, however, is to replace your rubber brake lines with braided stainless ones, like the ones from Russell.
     
  3. derekslawncare

    derekslawncare PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,003

    Really? There is THAT MUCH flex in the rubber hoses that you can tell a difference in braking by just replacing them?
     
  4. immortal.ben

    immortal.ben Member
    Messages: 65

    Yep, especially the more they age. It is a super simple upgrade, too.
     
  5. SnoFarmer

    SnoFarmer PlowSite Fanatic
    from N,E. MN
    Messages: 8,466

    Not all braided lines are DOT approved.
    Braided hoses usually fail the DOT whip test. This is when the hoses are attached to a drill motor like fixture and spun at high rpm for x hours. The steel fatigues and the lines fail in this sort of test.

    A braided stainless covering traps dirt and salt, and in most cases are used on jacked up 4x4's to protect against abrasion from sticks, mud and to look kool.

    "The braided steel lines do not swell when pressure is applied. This gives the pedal a firmer feel."

    Well, in theory, anyhow. The reality is that, if you are having real (as opposed to imaginary.....and there seems to be plenty of that going around) issues with brake pedal firmness, don't expect braided hoses to produce any miracles.

    many top end sports cars don't use braided stainless brake lines
     
  6. derekslawncare

    derekslawncare PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,003

    Good to know. Thank you. I just put new rear pads on (squeal tabs, not for pedal feel) and have the front ones sitting on the work bench to be done and was thinking that I should have done the hoses at the same time. Thanks for saving me the time and money. Good point about trapping salt/dirt. And it's a work truck, needs to be functional, not look cool. :)
     
  7. TJS

    TJS PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,339

    I just trashed a set of hawk pads on my 02 F250 SD. I kept on hearing a wierd squeal noise when I drove without stepping on the brake pedal. These have no indicators on them either. The left front pad was cracked and only had less miles on them and there was plenty of pad left. Junk in my book.
     
  8. immortal.ben

    immortal.ben Member
    Messages: 65

    Does this happen a lot on your trucks? My brake lines are stationary, except for flexing up and down with the axles. That test has nothing to do with real life usage of the part. Besides, the good stainless lines DO pass the whip test.

    Do you have anything to substantiate your claim that the hoses only produce imaginary results? The products used to manufacture OEM brake lines are highly flexible, which in one way is good, but it also leads to distention of the line under heavy breaking. It is impossible to have a brake line more resistant to distention without firmer braking. Simple science. Brake lines in a truck can experience around 4000psi.

    Many good stainless lines come with a protective coating to prevent trapping grit in the weaving.

    Top end sports cars weigh a great deal less than our trucks which are used for commercial purposes. They have proportionally larger brake to weight ratio than our trucks. The brakes on the sports cars do not work as hard as the brakes on our trucks, and they work less to do what they do.

    OP, do your own research (as I suggested in my first post) as there are always multiple sides to any opinion.
     
  9. SnoFarmer

    SnoFarmer PlowSite Fanatic
    from N,E. MN
    Messages: 8,466

    Do you have anything to support your assertions other than you say so?

    Next, the DOT test is the DOT test.

    and again, few high end sport cars use what your trying to get us to use..
    Porsche has never used the steel braided brake hoses on it's road cars.

    Yes my findings are supported by the industry...

    The most important thing to learn, about the steel braided hoses, is that the inner liner is Teflon and the reason there aren't any DOT-approved, steel-braided hoses out there is that the crimping of the hose ends onto Teflon is not considered to be fail-safe, because Teflon doesn't compress. Also, with the steel braded coverings, there is no visual indication of an impending failure of the crimped fitting. This is why SCCA recommends replacing of the steel braided hoses at regular intervals.

    http://www.centricparts.com/files/technical guides/stainless-steel-brake-lines.pdf
    http://www.stoptech.com/technical-support/technical-white-papers/stainless-steel-brake-lines-q-a
     
    Last edited: Nov 23, 2015
  10. SnoFarmer

    SnoFarmer PlowSite Fanatic
    from N,E. MN
    Messages: 8,466

    I have a 68 charger with the original rubber lines.
    i can easily lock up the wheels with one push of the peddle.( and not to the floor)
    I see no worth while gain to be had switching to a stainless steel line. what im i going to gain. 1/1000th of an inch less of peddle travel to achieve lock up?
     
  11. immortal.ben

    immortal.ben Member
    Messages: 65

    There are DOT approved braided lines out there. Not my fault you do not know about them.

    It is apparent to me that you have no desire to comprehend the science behind stopping an 8000 truck. Also not my fault.

    You compare apples and oranges when comparing car brakes to those of a truck. Ignorant at best, dangerous at worst, and misleading either way.
     
  12. kimber750

    kimber750 PlowSite Veteran
    Messages: 3,608

    :popcorn: 5...4...3...2.... lock down.
     
  13. derekslawncare

    derekslawncare PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,003

    Are you entering NORAD or something? :)
     
  14. Whiffyspark

    Whiffyspark 2000 Club Member
    from SOMD
    Messages: 2,402

    They all have their weaknesses. Most people don't buy dot approved they aren't easy to readily buy. Most are off road use only
     
  15. kimber750

    kimber750 PlowSite Veteran
    Messages: 3,608

    Just suspecting the mighty overlords of PS will be here soon.
     
  16. immortal.ben

    immortal.ben Member
    Messages: 65

    Yeah I am surprised it has not happened already.
     
  17. Randall Ave

    Randall Ave PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,943

    Ran the stainless steel lines on the dirt stock car, never had one fail on its own. And the rubber hoses are supposed to be replaced at around ten years per dealer. No I do not have the specifics in front of me. I have seen the crimps fail on rubber hoses also.
     
  18. SnoFarmer

    SnoFarmer PlowSite Fanatic
    from N,E. MN
    Messages: 8,466

    :dizzy:........

    2135.gif