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BOSS HID Lights

Discussion in 'Commercial Snow Removal' started by Caneplow, Dec 4, 2004.

  1. Caneplow

    Caneplow Senior Member
    Messages: 172

    Has anyone seen this in person or in action? What are they like? Are they worth the money?
     
  2. Crumm

    Crumm Senior Member
    Messages: 529

    I have a set of Hella HID's. At $1300 a set they are expensive but worth it. I don't know anything about the Boss ones but if they are true HID's I would have to say they are worth whatever they want for them.
     
  3. Tarkus

    Tarkus PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,113


    No me, I might lose a bulb once a year to vibration and it is cheaper to replace a 8 dollar bulb than a several hundred dollar HID unit and or bulb. To me HID plow lights border on foolish at current prices.
     
  4. Bolts Indus.

    Bolts Indus. PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,176

    Have to agree with that. Besides in a good blowing storm brighter lights make it harder not easier to see and cause you to tire very quickly. We all know what it;s like to put your car on high beam in snow. Doesn't work,right? $ 1300.00 is one third the price of a new plow. :)
     
  5. Tarkus

    Tarkus PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,113


    Very good point "Bolts" :waving:
     
  6. Crumm

    Crumm Senior Member
    Messages: 529

    Normally yes but with HID's it is different. The light that HID's put out is not like normal headlights. It is hard to explain but the snow does not reflect off of them like normal lights. They resemble the type of light that street lights put out. I bought mine about 5 years ago and they have been worth every single penny but I do go through some of the worse blowing snow on the earth (north slope of Alaska).
     
  7. Tarkus

    Tarkus PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,113

    It is a narrower spectrum light (not full spectrum like a bulb) so there is less wave lenghts to reflect in thoery so it may indeed "look" different but no cost effective if you have to replace one. When they get down to a few hunded for a set, I may look at them then.
     
  8. Crumm

    Crumm Senior Member
    Messages: 529

    Running north I use to replace normal bulbs (H4 piaa and 150watt sealed beam KC's) constantly. I had six KC's on top and two Piaa's on the fenders. Every trip I would replace at least 1 bulb if not more. I then replaced all 8 lights with two HID's. The 2 HID's put out more light than the 8 others put out together. In five years I have not replaced anything. The HID's don't burn out. If they ever do go out they have a lifetime warranty but many people up here have them and I have yet to hear of a failure. They are expensive for the initial purchase but in the long run they pay for themselves. H4 bulbs are $12 for the cheap ones and the KC sealed beams are $23. You figure 2 bulbs a week for about 32 weeks a year (dark up here most the winter) and the HID's save some cash.
     
  9. Tarkus

    Tarkus PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,113

    The higher the wattage of the bulb, the more it is prone to failure in vibration by design. Sub 100 watt bulbs last a lot longer in vibration environments
     
  10. Crumm

    Crumm Senior Member
    Messages: 529

    You are correct and I run a high vibration road (rock and gravel). I ran 135watt H4 bulbs and the 150watt sealed beams because they were cheaper than digging a Moose or Caribou out of the grill. The 100watt bulbs do last longer but don't put out enough light. I have found the best of both worlds in the HID's. They last forever and make the road look like it is daylight.
     
  11. Tarkus

    Tarkus PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,113

    Driving a bit slower at night or "twilight" keeps moose and carbou out of grill too.
     
  12. Crumm

    Crumm Senior Member
    Messages: 529

    Slower whats that :confused: :confused: . Even if I did know what you meant it would not work. We run a tight schedule and don't have time to be fooling around driving slow.
     
  13. Tarkus

    Tarkus PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,113


    You can drive bit slower if you allow for it in schedule. I never schedule quick commutes in my schedule
     
  14. Crumm

    Crumm Senior Member
    Messages: 529

    I am not commuting. I am hauling overnight express freight. I depart at 6pm and have to arrive on the north slope by 6am. To keep that schedule we have to average 46mph. There are many grades around 12% and miles of bad road conditions. On the good sections we cannot dilly dally around in-case there is a moose in the road so we use good lights to spot them so we can stay on schedule. I am getting the idea that either you are just wanting to argue or you feel that HID's have no purpose in this world. Whatever the answer I still think they are the best thing since peanut butter and I will continue to use them. If you want to continue to go through life in the dark that is totally fine by me. No reason to argue about it here.
     
  15. Tarkus

    Tarkus PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,113

    Hey I know AK is a different world of sorts but I too have spent some time in areas where animals a lot larger than deer can be on road at night and I found you have to balance speed and ability to see and stop too. I have made more than one journey at night at 30 to 40 below or more in my life and I enjoyed them and somewhat envy your trips.
     
  16. Caneplow

    Caneplow Senior Member
    Messages: 172

    Crum I thank you for your perspective on the HID Lights. I realize that you don't have the Boss and I will contact them directly to ensure that they are real HID's and now a "like" type.

    My girlfriend has HID's in her car and when it snows we could see the difference between her car and mine at this point per your reflection points. I agree it's a different perspective that's why I was intested for others thoughts.

    I will continue to research these but thanks again for your perspective.
     
  17. Crumm

    Crumm Senior Member
    Messages: 529

    No problem. I am sorry that we turned your thread into more of an argument than a technical discussion. I don't know why I feel it is necessary to defend what I think works the best but sometimes I do. Must just be human nature. I wish you the best in whatever light you decide to go with.
     
  18. Tarkus

    Tarkus PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,113

    The "defense" was more precieved than actually and I was just pointing out all the potenail costs. I will check them out with they get cheaper but no way at current prices as I have lost bulbs to stones too.
     
  19. Crumm

    Crumm Senior Member
    Messages: 529

    Me too that is why we run bullet proof, clear lexan covers over them.


    They are cheaper in the long run but I guess I am having trouble explaining that so I am going to quit trying.
     
  20. Caneplow

    Caneplow Senior Member
    Messages: 172

    No problem Crumm; my decision last time was much easier since i lived in Connecticut and lighting on the streets was much better. The place I may be relowing to in the Denver area has 3 to 400 foot unlite driveways and mountian roads with not much lights. My concerns is not only the fact that I want to be able to see but I want to be seen. There is a lot of animals, people and other cars on these roads and besides the lightbar I want to make sure that I have the best possible ability to be safe. There's a reason that Benz, BMW and other high end car makers use these lights. I want to make sure I am safe.