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blades and front ends

Discussion in 'Commercial Snow Removal' started by SKYNYRD, Jan 19, 2009.

  1. SKYNYRD

    SKYNYRD Senior Member
    Messages: 420

    i'm sure this has prolly been mentioned on here someplace before now. i did a search but couldn't find anything and i'm basically just curious what others think. some of you have seen pics of our one truck. it's a 73-87 body style chevy/gmc. dad has almost exclusively always used fishers unless he has had no choice but to use a different brand for reasons out of his control like was the case a couple of winters back when we put a western on the gm. the fisher broke beyond repair in a snowstorm (it was an original convention blade from back when they used metal guide poles on the ends) a good friend of ours had a salvage yard at the time and gave us a western. who in their right mind is gonna turn down a free plow? we put it on the truck and couldn't believe the difference it made in the way the truck handled. the fisher made the front end squat really bad but with the western it barely squats at all. i compared the 2 blades with info found on-line and they weigh the same. the difference of course is where the weight is. on the fishers a great deal of the weight is concentrated in the trip edge while on the western the bulk of the weight is in the A-frame and quadrant. i discovered that a couple summers ago when i completely disassembled a fisher right down to taking the springs and trip edge off. i could not pick the trip edge up without help but i could move the rest of the moldboard by myself. same with the western. once the quadrant and A-frame were off i could move the moldboard like nothing. sorry for making this so long but basically after all that my question is has anyone else ever noticed this? it definitely led us to believe the fisher puts way more strain on the front end of the truck it's on.
     
  2. Interesting theory and I have no proof but I don't believe it. Regardless of where the weight is it is still in front of the bumper so I *think* it will affect the suspension just the same.
     
  3. elite1msmith

    elite1msmith 2000 Club Member
    from chicago
    Messages: 2,762

    im not so sure about the westerns weight being closer to the truck than the fisher...so ill leave that for someone else

    but... in THEORY, yes the further the weight is fom the front axle ... the more strain it will cause. it really doesnt have to do with the location on the blade....as it does jsut the general location from the axles. So a plow with a longer A frame , might weigh less but have more strain on your truck , while the blade is in the air


    when the blade is on the ground, the reverse effect is had.. a blade that has weight closer to the edge, will have less effect on the truck... it might also clean better
     
  4. SKYNYRD

    SKYNYRD Senior Member
    Messages: 420

    this is why i'm loving this site. everyone has an opinion and you stand a great chance of learning something new. thanks for your input guys. i can't wait to hear what others have to say about this. :salute:
     
  5. elite1msmith

    elite1msmith 2000 Club Member
    from chicago
    Messages: 2,762

    its all about leverage... you could do some math and figure it out but im too lazy


    one other thing to consider.. alot of springs have a "giving point" and the western might be put just a hair less weight on the truck, ... the fisher might be more... but because your at that certain point with the spings... it makes it look 10X worst... but the weight difference might only be 50 lbs