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Blade Tripping

Discussion in 'Commercial Snow Removal' started by oldmankent, Jan 14, 2002.

  1. oldmankent

    oldmankent PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,318

    I know I know, there was just a thread on tripping the blade, but I have a different question. we just got alot of wet snow (more like 4 inches) here last night, and then everything froze overnight. Anyway, this evening I plowed a driveway and the blade tripped like crazy. what I expected to happen didn't . I thought the blade would trip and I would push through the pile. didn't happen though. I'd just stop, and have to back up or lift the blade to untrip it. I'm guessing that it just dug down into the frozen stuff and wouldn't break out so it just stopped me. ended up lifting the blade and scraping off a little at a time. I felt like stepping on the gas to push through the trip would have been too much pressure. Anyone have any thoughts, or ideas on what might have worked better? thanks, Nick
     
  2. plowking35

    plowking35 2000 Club Member
    from SE CT
    Messages: 2,923

    I am assuming a fisher plow. That is generally what will happen.Most times just back up a few inches and the plow will untrip, sometimes just putting the truck in N will allow the plow to untrip.
    If you did just power through it, the plow would have just rode up and over the unplowed area.
    Just remember, if it was a full trip plow, you wouldnt have been able to plow at all.
    Dino
     
  3. WHITE=GREEN

    WHITE=GREEN Senior Member
    Messages: 161

    your walking a fine line with the "search police":rolleyes: how old are your springs? old/weak springs will trip much easier than new ones. the only other thing i can think you can do in that situation is angle you blade and try to bite a little off at a time. had to do this several times with snow/ice. plowing that stuff is very hard on a truck so take your time, if you have time, because a beat-up broken down truck or plow is useless to finish your route.
     
  4. oldmankent

    oldmankent PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,318

    It's a snoway. The springs are 5 years old, but only have about 40 hrs. on them. I thought the plow would have rode up over the pile, but I guess that may only happen with fishers? In any case I won't be waiting till stuff freezes up as hard as a rock.
     
  5. matthew Urban

    matthew Urban Senior Member
    Messages: 129

    snoway,
    ok, then what truck?
    what size, weight? How old?
    more info would help.
    plowing surface(gravel, old/new pavement etc...)
    Would like to help,
    matt
     
  6. plowking35

    plowking35 2000 Club Member
    from SE CT
    Messages: 2,923

    On full trip plows when you trip the moldboard, it loads up incredible tension on the edge. You can push through it, but the plow will rebound very hard, and that is what breaks stuff. You did the right thing, back up and let the plow rebound as easily as possible. Did you have the DP on as well? If so that would only add to the problem.
    Dino
     
  7. Bryan

    Bryan Senior Member
    Messages: 108

    make sure your trip springs are adjusted properly, you should be able to barely see daylight between the coils on the springs. Frozen pack is tough on any plow, if you have the DP on plowing forward it will load up and then hitting frozen pack will cause the plow to trip, don't know how deep it is where you're plowing but the plow should not be tripping like crazy unless it is speed combined with frozen pack which will cause a reaction like you plowing along, trip, plowing, trip, ect. You might find backdragging more favorable at least to peel down to the frozen pack. Pre-treating the frozen area might be an answer also.
     
  8. John DiMartino

    John DiMartino PlowSite.com Veteran
    Messages: 2,154

    Maybe put the shoes on and space them up a full inch or 2,then plow it twice,once with the shoes,and once without,so your not taking so much off at once.For the 5 minutes it will take,its worth a try.Sure beats breaking the blade/springs,or backing up every 5 feet.In the future,try to get out and startplowing the minute it stops,so you can get most of your work done before it freezes.I never let snow sit overnight.plow it off asap.
     
  9. oldmankent

    oldmankent PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,318

    I am plowing with a 7.5' 25 series snoway. I have a 96 F250 PSD ext. cab long bed. 5 spd. 4x4. I usually put anywhere from 650-1000 lbs in the bed for ballast. I think the plow tripping is due to the icy conditions and the weight of the truck. I'll just lift it from now on till it doesn't trip and then make another pass. thanks for all the replies guys. I'm actually glad the plow trips because I think my truck would break the plow if it didn't trip. I wouldn't know I was pushing into something that catches the blade until something snapped. Anyway, got another inch of wet snow here on the coast today. should melt away soon if it doesn't freeze up
     
  10. John DiMartino

    John DiMartino PlowSite.com Veteran
    Messages: 2,154

    No wonder it tripped you got way more truck than that little blade can handle. You overpowered it from the way it sounds.
     
  11. oldmankent

    oldmankent PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,318

    John, the first time it tripped I was rolling down a hill clutch disengaged and it tripped. I know I gotta take it easy with this thing. the point of the small plow is to stay within my front GAWR of 4600 lbs.