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BFG AT T/A KO's opinion?

Discussion in 'Truck & Equipment Repair' started by ontario026, Dec 2, 2009.

  1. ontario026

    ontario026 Senior Member
    Messages: 228

    I just had a set of E rated 245/75/16 BFG A/T Ko's installed, and so far I am not a huge fan of them... They were installed on the stock rims from my truck, and they replace 265/75/16 Yokohama HT/S tires on American racing summer wheels... The 245s are the stock size on the truck... To me they feel 'Loose" on the road, kind of like driving on squishy rubber balls... They don't feel responsive, like turn the wheel now, and the truck feels like there is a delay before it responds... I hoped that some dork tire guy only put like 30Lbs of air in them, but I checked them and they are at 80LBS (the max load rating for these E rated tires.... I do not remember the Dunlop Radial Rover RVXT that I ran last year in a 245/75/16 feeling funny like this, and they were only P rated, (thanks to idiots at canadian tire) and that is why I sold them off cheap to put an E rated tire back on the truck....

    I have no doubt they should work well in the snow, I just dislike the responsiveness, or lack of....

    Matthew

    2000 silverado 2500 ext cab short box, 8.5 SS ExtremeV
     
  2. Schwinn68

    Schwinn68 Senior Member
    Messages: 164

    I would take some air out of them. Unless you're towing a LOT of weight your ride should be much better with around 50 pounds of air. I had the bfg's at in a 265 load range d and I loved them.
     
  3. 2COR517

    2COR517 PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 7,115

    You don't specify your motor, so I assume it's a 6.0 Gas job. Fronts at 40-45, rears at 30-35. This is assuming it's usually just you, no significant weight in the back of the truck.
     
  4. THEGOLDPRO

    THEGOLDPRO PlowSite Veteran
    Messages: 3,136

    im not a fan, i am on my second set and they are too soft, i burn a set up every year. they are great in the snow, but i cant afford to replace them every year.
     
  5. rgnesda

    rgnesda Junior Member
    Messages: 18

    BFG A/T 's are the best tire out there. They are great in the snow, and off road. they are even good in the mud if you spin them fast. They will throw some serious roost spinning 40 mph in loose stuff.

    I have been using them for years. Almost all of my friends use them too.

    Definatly air them down. That applies to any tire. You only need enough air to carry the weight that you have. There is some charts out there for the PSI vs load. Sometimes it can be a PIA but i adjust my air pressure a lot in the winter. Usually 35-40 in the front and 30-50 in the rear. depending what im hauling never over 55 psi and that is when i have 3000- 3500 lbs in the bed. That is with a 265/75-16 load range D.

    Oh by the way why do most guys think they need E's? depending on size D is plenty and rides better empty. My size has a load rating just over 3000 lbs. x 4 is over 12000. The GVW is 8600 and the most i have ever had on it was a load of scrap and it grossed 9400. With a 245 you need an E because of the lower rating for that size.

    I few years ago i was hauling tons of firewood in muddy conditions. They were clearing some ditch and fence lines across the street from me. I had to air down to about 10 psi in the front and 8-10 in the rear to keep from getting stuck. The guys on the job were amazed that i could drive through the stuff. it was about 8 inches of sloppy clay mud from them running dozers and excavators all over. no spinning it would just drive through it with about 3000 lbs of firewood. The tires were squatted to the white letters were almost on the ground. I keeped it under 15 mph and just aired them up when i was done.

    oh i have a 1994 K2500 that i work hard.
     
  6. Mark Oomkes

    Mark Oomkes PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 10,919

    Great, next time I'm in mud and not SNOW, I'll keep that in mind.

    They are good tires, second only to Cooper M&S in snow in my experiences. Mine are seeming to wear a little faster than I hoped, but I have not experienced the same problems you are having.
     
  7. Danscapes

    Danscapes Senior Member
    Messages: 164

    Whats with all of this "air down" crap? Doesn't any one realize that an under inflated tire wears prematurely? 5-10 pounds might be ok for a short period, but 30 pounds under inflated is just stupid! There's a reason they put those funny little stickers on the gas door or rocker panel that tell you exactly how much air should be in the tires.
     
  8. rgnesda

    rgnesda Junior Member
    Messages: 18

    I guess you drive around in the summer fully loaded with your plow and salt speader too? most people use their trucks for many things. If you only plowed with it and nothing else that woulds be a little different story.

    We are talking about tires on a pickups not class 8 semis and medium duty trucks like 450's and 550's.

    If you have a load range E tire on the front of a normal plow truck like a F250, F350 or 2500HD and the tires are rated at 3400 at 80 psi then you could carry 6800 lbs at that pressure. The front axle ratings are only 4500-5000 lbs on most of these. The only thing you gain with higher pressure is a stiffer ride, more worn suspension parts and less traction.
     
  9. Mark Oomkes

    Mark Oomkes PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 10,919

    Baaaaaah, that would be like paying attention to your GVW, why bother?

    Yeah, I use my 550's and F800 to ride around in.

    Think about this a little. Are you really going to be paying employees to go around airing down and airing up tires on a daily or weekly basis due to hauling or not hauling a load or trailer? You have GOT to be kidding me. Talk about unproductive, waste of time. Not sure you quite grasp the concept of being efficient and getting rid of time wasting activities.
     
  10. rgnesda

    rgnesda Junior Member
    Messages: 18

    The truck manufatcure rating for the tire pressure is always lower then the tire sidewall. This is because it is set to carry the max GVW of the truck not the tires. But because the truck is not always at the max GVW why should the tires be at the max? Overinflation also effects tire life.

    Nevermind, you guys don't understand. I know what i'm talkingabout and have never had a single tire issue or blowout. (not counting nails)

    My dad has put 90,000 -100,000 miles on 2 different sets of BFG's on his truck (about 235,000 on it now) 2003 dodge w/ cummins. Hever really hauls or tows much. just on weekends. He figured out the 40 in the front and 32 in the back yielded the best tire life and ride.
     
  11. rgnesda

    rgnesda Junior Member
    Messages: 18

    [/QUOTE]Think about this a little. Are you really going to be paying employees to go around airing down and airing up tires on a daily or weekly basis due to hauling or not hauling a load or trailer? You have GOT to be kidding me. Talk about unproductive, waste of time. Not sure you quite grasp the concept of being efficient and getting rid of time wasting activities.[/QUOTE]

    we are not talking about a fleet of trucks here. The guys who started this thread was talking about the set of tires on a 2500HD. Not a semi or a F800 or a whole fleet of plow trucks.

    Im also assuming he uses his truck for more then just plowing. Who said anything about employees???
     
  12. Mark Oomkes

    Mark Oomkes PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 10,919

    You're absolutely correct.

    I'm just a 15 YO girl from South Beach.

    Think about this a little. Are you really going to be paying employees to go around airing down and airing up tires on a daily or weekly basis due to hauling or not hauling a load or trailer? You have GOT to be kidding me. Talk about unproductive, waste of time. Not sure you quite grasp the concept of being efficient and getting rid of time wasting activities.[/QUOTE]

    we are not talking about a fleet of trucks here. The guys who started this thread was talking about the set of tires on a 2500HD. Not a semi or a F800 or a whole fleet of plow trucks.

    Im also assuming he uses his truck for more then just plowing. Who said anything about employees???[/QUOTE]

    I am, because this 15 YO girl has a fleet of trucks.

    I said something about employees, because this 15 YO girl has a few.

    I know you're new, but what you are failing to realize by handing out this information is that the OP isn't the only one reading this thread. And it is possible, even likely that someone who doesn't know better--who does have a fleet and employees--is going to take your advice to heart and start pissing away money because they think you are the end all, be all for tire knowledge, when you're not.

    And airing down tires for use in the snow is as stupid as getting wide tires for plowing. Narrow is what you need for plowing.
     
  13. WIPensFan

    WIPensFan PlowSite Veteran
    Messages: 3,508

    How are you burning up a set every year?
     
  14. rgnesda

    rgnesda Junior Member
    Messages: 18

    This is not what i ment either. Can we at least agree that having the tire at the max pressure that is marked on the sidewall all the time is overkill? You should at least be going by the rating that is set by the truck mfg on the door sticker.

    I totally agree with the narrow tire in snow. I think the 265 is a good compromise, not too wide like a 285 and looks and performs better then a 245 for me. Plus you gain a little height.