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Beet juice in tires

Discussion in 'Commercial Snow Removal' started by Doug8949, Dec 1, 2014.

  1. Doug8949

    Doug8949 Member
    Messages: 64

    Has anyone put beet juice in tires to increase traction. I know the wolf paw tires and stuff but I am wondering about beet juice to add weight for traction with my chains.
     
  2. jimbo64

    jimbo64 Senior Member
    Messages: 194

    I know they use beet juice on highways in some areas but never heard of putting it in tires and can't understand why you would even do that.
     
  3. seville009

    seville009 Senior Member
    from CNY
    Messages: 733

    Depends on how big the tires are that you're filling relative to how much weight they'll add. A gallon of water weighs 8 lbs. Are you dealing with a tractor or skid steer? Skid steer tires are too small for much weight to be added by filling them.
     
  4. LapeerLandscape

    LapeerLandscape PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,587

    Farmers would put calcium chloride in the tires for added weight, today they put beet juice in there as it wont rust the rims.
     
  5. Buswell Forest

    Buswell Forest PlowSite.com Addict
    from NH
    Messages: 1,668

    Tire shops sell it as a brand called "rim-guard". Any competent shop will know how much to add for your application. It is much heavier than water per given volume.
     
  6. Doug8949

    Doug8949 Member
    Messages: 64

    4 skid steer tire filled 75%with beet juice 642 pounds of weight added

    image.jpg
     
  7. Doug8949

    Doug8949 Member
    Messages: 64

    12x16.5 is what my skid has for tires.
     
  8. bigmackmiller

    bigmackmiller Member
    Messages: 32

    Heard of it in the Ag sector but, never on a skid, I suppose it would work but the downside of loading the tires is you lose flex, not sure if it will help or hurt you on a hard surface
     
  9. Antlerart06

    Antlerart06 PlowSite Veteran
    Messages: 3,437

    You ever lifted a skid tire filled with beet juice
     
  10. framer1901

    framer1901 Senior Member
    Messages: 813

    Weight helps with traction, the only thing it'll hurt is that lawn you drive across in the summer.

    Oh, don't get it on you, it has a lasting effect.

    Oh, don't try to check the air pressure in the tires either.
     
  11. NickSnow&Mow

    NickSnow&Mow Senior Member
    Messages: 646

    We use antifreeZe
     
  12. jimbo64

    jimbo64 Senior Member
    Messages: 194

    I learned something new today which is always good. I did know about calcium chloride in tractor tires but wasn't aware of all the other uses. Now for my next question....do you hear the liquid sloshing around when you are moving?
     
  13. LapeerLandscape

    LapeerLandscape PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,587

    No you cant even tell its in there. I believe you fill the liquid up to the top part of the rim so you only have from the top of the rim to top of the tire with air. If you put air in the tire you always put the valve stem at the top.
     
  14. NickSnow&Mow

    NickSnow&Mow Senior Member
    Messages: 646

    I dont. Althought we use old antifreeze
     
  15. NLS1

    NLS1 Senior Member
    Messages: 315

    We have our new Kubota M135 with beet juice in all 4 tires.

    110 gallons in the rears each. and I believe about 50 in each front.

    The older one we only had loaded rear tires with calcium.

    This tractor is vastly better with traction with the weight in the fronts too.

    Turning is much easier with the plow, in fact the traction in front is so good I don't need to use 4 wheel drive much.

    It seems to smooth out the ride as well. Although the new one has a different front end, or the suspension or something, it is much better.

    I would think it would help, to a lesser degree on the smaller machines.

    But for the cost, I don't think you could beat beet juice... I had too sorry....

    Dan
     
  16. jimbo64

    jimbo64 Senior Member
    Messages: 194

    Very interesting, thanks all for the info .
     
  17. Mark Oomkes

    Mark Oomkes PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 10,853

    Beat me to it.

    Beet juice is heavier per gallon than calcium as well.

    How do you lose flex? The tire is not filled 100%.
     
  18. LapeerLandscape

    LapeerLandscape PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,587

    You might be thinking of foam filled tires form losing flex.
     
  19. Antlerart06

    Antlerart06 PlowSite Veteran
    Messages: 3,437

    I run it in tractors and you can feel it when you come to a stop not as much on the new tractors vs older tractors that has manual brakes
    Check the air stem needs be at the top Tire isn't filled all the way up you still have to add air to them
     
  20. bigmackmiller

    bigmackmiller Member
    Messages: 32

    "Liquid ballast has a stiffening effect that causes a rough ride. If liquid ballast is used in the rear tires, all tires on the axle must be filled to the same level. Do not exceed 40% fill."

    http://www.deere.com/en_US/ag/servicesupport/tips/tractors/common_stories/control_power_hop.html#

    Now i'm not saying liquid is not a cost effective source of adding additional weight but a properly inflated tire with weight outside the tire will have a better contact patch than one with liquid.

    I think that liquid is a great choice though with the limited area to put weight on the outside of a skid.
     
    Last edited: Dec 2, 2014