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auto trans temp gauges anyone?

Discussion in 'Commercial Snow Removal' started by bill 1964, Sep 9, 2009.

  1. bill 1964

    bill 1964 Junior Member
    Messages: 19

    just curious as to how many of you run trans temp gauges to head off a trans melt down? ( i was a gm. tech for many years and we used to get alot of plow trucks during the winter w/ cooked auto transmissions).
    i have a thread on fisher plow engineering on installing a plow on a 94' f250 but did not want to change the topic, this will be my first plow on an older truck w/ 100k on the odo.
    so.. how many rely on a temp gauge to head off problems or just go at it?ussmileyflag
     
  2. B&B

    B&B PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 12,777

    Like a trans cooler, best to run one on a working truck. Both very cheap insurance for a very expensive and critical component that can and will leave you dead in the water at the most inopportune time...and then proceeds to clean out your wallet.

    Like the age old adage Ben Franklin once coined...An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. Still holds true today....
     
  3. 2COR517

    2COR517 PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 7,115

    Where do you recommend installing the temp sender? Line to the cooler, from the cooler, in the pan?

    Or all three:nod:
     
  4. B&B

    B&B PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 12,777

    It's best to monitor temps in the pan or in the test port right after the pump for the most accuracy; since by monitoring in the pan your getting the average/overall running temp of the bulk of the fluid. With the sender located anywhere else it will always read hotter or cooler than the overall temp. As an example, if your sender is in the outbound cooler line it will read a higher temp than the average/overall trans temp. Same with the return cooler line except it will show a cooler reading LOWER than the average temp since the fluid has already been cooled. If I had to install the sender in a cooler line for one reaosn or another I would place it in the outbound line since it's more useful as it's reading the hottest possible fluid and at least it will give you an approximate idea of running temps...which is far better than nothing at all.

    When discussing max trans temps you always use the pan temps as your basis, which is the industry standard. The outbound cooler line fluid temp can easily be 30* higher (and at times considerably more under certain conditions) than the actual running temp in the pan so you need to take that exaggerated reading into consideration when checking the gauge temps.

    So an example here would be if you wantede to keep the overall/average trans temp at say a max of 200*...your sender that's reading temps in the outbound cooler line could actually read 230*-250* before the overall pan temp is actually up to 200*. Basically it's just an educated estimate, but any kind of temp reading is far better than nothing at all and the pan or test port is still the best location for the sender.
     
  5. hydro_37

    hydro_37 PlowSite Veteran
    from iowa
    Messages: 3,790

    I watch my trans temp guage when I plow or tow heavy.
     
  6. 2COR517

    2COR517 PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 7,115

    So lets say, for example, a guy has a 4L80e. Where would he find said test port? And what would be the correct sending unit thread for that?
     
  7. B&B

    B&B PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 12,777

    Said port would be located slightly above and aft of the shift selector shaft on the driver side. Port is 1/8" pipe thread. Or that size just a little smaller than my pinky finger as explained to the parts store guy.
     
  8. 2COR517

    2COR517 PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 7,115

    ROTFLMAO!

    OK, I'm back in the chair. Wow, almost woke up the wife. Was this the explanation given TO the parts guy (by you)?

    For the folks up north (or to the left of the map), do their digits correlate to metric threads?
     
  9. B&B

    B&B PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 12,777

    Often times it's the best description for those newbie parts counter jockeys. They're usually the ones who first get out the bolt thread "cheat sheet" and can't find it on there. Of course not, because it's not bolt thread it's pipe.

    Not directly. They also need to include the base correction factor of {EXT.PID}*2.5+8.75/14.7 to accurately establish the threads per inch and diameter. But they usually start with the wrong finger anyway. :D
     
  10. Milwaukee

    Milwaukee 2000 Club Member
    Messages: 2,180

    Question

    If pan don't have drain plug. Could we put Tee on cooler line to transmission's port? I am think put on cooler line from transmission to radiator so that will tell hotter temperature?
     
  11. B&B

    B&B PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 12,777

    Many pans don't have a drain, and even when they do I don't use it to install a temp sender. Instead I weld an 1/8" pipe bung in and use it instead.
     
  12. Milwaukee

    Milwaukee 2000 Club Member
    Messages: 2,180

    That should be work. Is tig or mig welder better for that?

    Could you get pictures of that. I know what it look but I am concerned about leak around weld on bung while you have no idea it was leak when plow snow.

    Did you do both side weld. One for bottom and one for top of bung in pan?
     
  13. B&B

    B&B PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 12,777

    I prefer MIG over TIG as the bungs I use are made from black iron vs steel. MIG's easier for those not so pure metals.

    Simply drill a hole through the pan slightly lager than the ID of the bung, center the bung over the drilled hole and weld it around the outside. Never found the need to also weld it on the inside.

    If you're not so sure of your welding qualities you can also run a bead of epoxy around the bung fully covering the weld, smoothing the epoxy for appearance sake and you're done.
     
  14. basher

    basher PlowSite Fanatic
    from 19707
    Messages: 8,993

    Or a little larger then his......:D
     
  15. 2COR517

    2COR517 PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 7,115

    Mil, I'm pretty sure you want that bung in the SIDE of the pan, not the bottom.

    B&B?
     
  16. B&B

    B&B PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 12,777

    Nope, I normally locate them in the bottom. Mainly because there's little exterior space around the outside perimeter of the pan with D-shafts and cats occupying said space. And also on the electronic controlled transmissions there's little internal allowance as the valvebodys hug the pan rather closely. On some I will weld a short section of split tubing around the temp sensor location if I'm concerned (due to the application) that it may get pruned off. A nice section of 1 1/2" tubing with a 3/4" wide slit cut down the side for wire routing makes a nice safety shield.

    However on something older (non electronic) or very low to the ground I will place it in the side if exterior space does allow.
     
  17. B&B

    B&B PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 12,777

    I do have rather large hands. :D
     
  18. 2COR517

    2COR517 PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 7,115

    I don't know dude. My pinky is at least as big as a1/4" plug, maybe a 3/8":p
     
  19. B&B

    B&B PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 12,777

    You've never used a dial caliper to measure you're fingers?


    Amateur. :D
     
  20. basher

    basher PlowSite Fanatic
    from 19707
    Messages: 8,993

    but it's not the size of your finger that... oh never mind

    Dial caliper:eek:neanderthal, digital, so easy a caveman could do it:D