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Are plow parts heat treated?

Discussion in 'Truck & Equipment Repair' started by birddseedd, Jan 18, 2014.

  1. birddseedd

    birddseedd PlowSite Veteran
    Messages: 3,516

    what title says
     
  2. BladeBlowBucket

    BladeBlowBucket Member
    Messages: 92

    What Parts are you referring to ??? …… cause the plows I've owned were'nt ….. only the tilt pins and cutting edges were, on some of the models I've owned not even the pin boss's were harder, on some they had some casted parts that were brittle and harder to weld because of either hardness or just plainly cast iron …… cheers
     
  3. birddseedd

    birddseedd PlowSite Veteran
    Messages: 3,516

    well. for instance, the hinge where the pins go through. although. to do that would involve hardening the entire a frame.

    I wouldnt think hardening it would be done and when we weld broken parts it would soften the metal. but here is a new question.

    would hardening it be worth doing. it would not cost much, (re coating it would add to the cost) and would make the joints and everything last much longer.
     
  4. BladeBlowBucket

    BladeBlowBucket Member
    Messages: 92

    My first plow was a Meyer (Many Many Moons Ago …. LOL) and i'm sure the way they tilt/trip are better built than back then ….. But Mine was JUNK ! ….. the next Plow was an Arctic 8' (Also many Moons but less than the last) it Too was JUNK at the hinging points ……. they would break, I would repair then they would find another place to break ! …. it was endless repair ……
    Along the way I got a blade for the Skid-steer built by Bcat/Erskine ….. it was built better, but still the same points were issues ….. What I did what seemed to work was to rebuild using Hardened press-in inserts (bushings) where the Gr.8 bolts went thru (OEM, they didn't use case hardened pins w/cotter pins and washers to space) …… that was the key on that product, it stopped the elongation of holes that happen with using hardened bolts/pins and mild steel mix butt plates …. the mild steel held the harder pin-boss's in place allowing the play in the joints to be reduced, hence less cracking …… BUT as I mentioned that worked on that product.

    By what I read in your post avitar …. you have a hybrid plow, one built from two ??? …….. maybe your system can be mod'd to try what I did ???? ….. Cheers :drinkup:
     
  5. birddseedd

    birddseedd PlowSite Veteran
    Messages: 3,516

    It sounds like we had about the same situation. I started with a crap plow. And kept fixing this and that and everything else that broke.

    That is an interesting fix you used. Spread the impact from the pin to a hardened bushing, which in turn would spread it to an even larger area of the mild steel. It would certainly keep the joints tight for a much longer period of time.

    My idea, when getting a new plow, or rebuilding what I have, would be, as i mentioned, to have it tempered, and then galvanized/hot dipped.. Tempering alone would help with rust, but the main function would be that it would last much longer (assuming its not over tempered, 58HRC would be ideal for plowing).

    What do you think of this idea?
     
  6. Whiffyspark

    Whiffyspark 2000 Club Member
    from SOMD
    Messages: 2,402

    Remember plows are weaker in certain spots to prevent colleratal damage to other parts/the truck
     
  7. birddseedd

    birddseedd PlowSite Veteran
    Messages: 3,516

    So, in other words, hit ice unexpectedly and go for a cement wall, your a frame will buckle before your truck frame?
     
  8. Whiffyspark

    Whiffyspark 2000 Club Member
    from SOMD
    Messages: 2,402

    90% sure the pivot pins would.

    I'm sure someone else can answer this better. Just how I understand it.
     
  9. birddseedd

    birddseedd PlowSite Veteran
    Messages: 3,516

    That sounds pretty smart. i think the bushign idea is probably best.

    Im pretty sure a 1/4" angle iron with leverage will bend before the sheering force on a 1" pin.
     
  10. birddseedd

    birddseedd PlowSite Veteran
    Messages: 3,516

    any chance you can show an example of the type of bushings you used?

    thanks
     
  11. birddseedd

    birddseedd PlowSite Veteran
    Messages: 3,516

    Course, the newer plows use pins that arn't in a 1/2 inch piece of flatstock, so enlongating is not as much of an issue.
     
  12. Rick547

    Rick547 Senior Member
    from Indiana
    Messages: 535

    Heat treating steel can make it brittle and more susceptible to breakage.
     
  13. BUFF

    BUFF PlowSite Fanatic
    from FR NoCo
    Messages: 7,319

    The correct grade of steel and proper heat treating heat treated steel does maintain a good flex modules. Every steel has it's limits when it comes to heat treating and the Rockwell hardness they can go to. You can get pre-hard steels that do not require heat treating with a Rockwell hardness of 32-36RC, Tool steel including 400 series Stainless typically get heat treated from 46-56 RC depending on the grade of steel and if you want a differentiation in hardness to reduce galling. Most of the time any steel over 58RC is O1 and can go up in to the mid 60's RC.

    Heat treating is no a cheap process when properly done, most heat treat shops typically have a "Lot Charge" that can range from $200.00-350.00 for a basket that's 18"X18" in size

    ASTM A36 is what's typically used for general fabrication and I believe is what's used on Snow Plow frames and mounts, it's in the mid teens when it comes to RC hardness.
    Could pivot points on plows be improved, yes, Heat Treating components for better wear, no. The use of replaceable bushings, Pin's plated with Nichol/Teflon and grease zirks work be a great improvement, but most importantly routine cleaning/maintenance is the most important thing to do to keep your plow in good shape for years.
     
  14. Rick547

    Rick547 Senior Member
    from Indiana
    Messages: 535

    I'm well aware of your information. I just tried to make my reply simple. My mistake. You last paragraph hit the nail on the head.
     
  15. BUFF

    BUFF PlowSite Fanatic
    from FR NoCo
    Messages: 7,319

    Ahh, you went for the Reader's Digest version, I went for Metallurgy 101.

    Everything requires maintenance to some degree to work properly and lack of is typically the root cause for mechanical failure's.
     
  16. birddseedd

    birddseedd PlowSite Veteran
    Messages: 3,516

    Tool steels are more like 60hrc and up. Such as m2. M4. And the classic d2. I'm building a knife out of m4 and will treat it to 60. Its standard beginning hardness. When I have the cash I want to build one one out of crowy-x and treat it to 70 to 72hrc. Itl be awesome.

    On the subject of plow steel, they could use friction forging and treat only the pivot points to a higher hardness than the rest, tho, would not be cheap at all, and as I mentioned earlier, unnecessary for the newer designs
     
  17. birddseedd

    birddseedd PlowSite Veteran
    Messages: 3,516

    Or on my case. Buying one that sat for 2 years:sleeping:
     
  18. Rick547

    Rick547 Senior Member
    from Indiana
    Messages: 535

    It is all good! Talking about maintenance. It looks like I'm going have to do a little on my plow this week. Nothing serious just routine maintenance stuff.