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Anyone use Sno-Wheels?

Discussion in 'Government Property Snow Removal' started by SServices, Oct 27, 2010.

  1. SServices

    SServices Senior Member
    Messages: 163

    Anyone use sno-wheels on their plows? All of our trucks have sno-wheels on the plows and just curious how everyone who uses them likes them.
     
  2. Township1

    Township1 Member
    Messages: 94

    sno-wheels???
     
  3. SServices

    SServices Senior Member
    Messages: 163

    I'll post a pic tomarrow
     
  4. SServices

    SServices Senior Member
    Messages: 163

  5. mc1

    mc1 Senior Member
    Messages: 171

    what is the point of those things idont get it what do the wheels do when plow is mounted to truck:mechanic:
     
  6. SServices

    SServices Senior Member
    Messages: 163

    They take some of the weight of the plow off the cutting edge to reduce wear on the edge
     
  7. Township1

    Township1 Member
    Messages: 94

    We call them Casters, and we do run them on some of our plows. From an operational standpoint I do not see a real difference in them. From a management standpoint, they do reduce the wear in the cutting edge by about 25%.
     
  8. SServices

    SServices Senior Member
    Messages: 163

    Yea we call it the same as well, their just a type of caster.
     
  9. dumbyankee

    dumbyankee Member
    Messages: 66

    Question ? Dose the cost of, and the time mounting snow wheels on your plow save enough money as compaired to a plow with out them ? And a second question - Has any one used them on a gravel road in the spring? We plow just over 30 miles of town road, most of it gravel and if any one has experience with these in this type of situation your comments might help. Thanks.
     
  10. WingPlow

    WingPlow Senior Member
    Messages: 634

    doing a gravel road when its soft is probably the only thing wheels are good for

    as far as taking some weight off the cutting edge,,,why ??, its the job of the cutting edge to cut and not to ride over the snow
     
  11. tailboardtech

    tailboardtech Senior Member
    Messages: 140

    we call them casters we have them on all our plows most of our trucks have rubber edges on them , you have to have them on or else you would just cut the rubber edge right off
     
  12. SServices

    SServices Senior Member
    Messages: 163

    Once the wheels are mounted they stay on. We only have asphalt and chip and seal roads. Cutting edges aren't cheap, around $800 a set. We run dual edges on the same blade. One is carbide and on top of that is a regular steel edge. We rougly get 30% more life out of a cutting edge with casters then without. I don't think they would help too much on soft ground, our plows run about 3500lbs (11' Gledhills), spread out on two small wheels isn't much.
     
    Last edited: Nov 1, 2010
  13. SServices

    SServices Senior Member
    Messages: 163

    Its not taking all the weight off the edge, just enough to keep the edge from wearing out so fast. Once you get a hard pack snow its unlikely to scrape it down to bare pavement. Salt does the rest of the work
     
  14. WingPlow

    WingPlow Senior Member
    Messages: 634

    throw them casters away and you wont get any hardpack
     
  15. dumbyankee

    dumbyankee Member
    Messages: 66

    Thanks for the answer SServices. I can see the application on asphalt. It would be easer on the plow using the wheels in that application. Cutting edges alone would pay for the wheels, and the fuel saved helps the wallet. Now the hard pack, you will get either way just from the traffic on the road. Application of salt you are going to use either way. We are running ton trucks with 9' plows and do a lot of gravel back roads. Most are areas the wheelers just dont work well. Narrow, steep quick hills, and tight turns are common on most of the roads. I can see the use of the wheels through most of the year, its just when spring hits that bothers me the most. Last thing I need is something that will dig in more than I do now. Thanks.
     
  16. OldCrow

    OldCrow Member
    Messages: 36

    I've run our trucks both ways. With and without casters. Mainly just to see if there was really much of a difference.

    Like has already been said, it saves a ton on the blades. We run mainly rubber, and without the casters they don't last the season. I ran our brand new 10' plow for our backhoe last year without the skid shoes trying to break up hardpack and it needs a new steel blade already.

    As far as hardpack, not running casters will not really help. Once its packed down, the best you can do is get enough salt down, combined with the heat from the sun and heat from the traffics tires, to break the bond it has with the road surface. Then try to plow it off.