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Anybody with a 73-87 GMC/Chevy

Discussion in 'Chevy Trucks' started by Hoggin GMC, Mar 30, 2002.

  1. Hoggin GMC

    Hoggin GMC Junior Member
    Messages: 13

    Hi, all. I was wondering if anybody could give me details about there trucks and what aftermarket parts you have in them. Pictures are nice too. Please post them.

    Thanks
     
  2. CT18fireman

    CT18fireman Banned
    Messages: 2,133

    Get in touch with 75 and check his buildup of his K-35
     
  3. 75

    75 PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,382

    Thanks CT18 :)

    Actually, even better is to go to www.chuckschevytruckpages.com he's got lots of '73 - '87 GM truck info, and has photos of my K-35 project there.

    The majority of parts in mine are actually salvaged from other trucks (or built "from scratch", ie bumper, headache rack, winch mount...........) most of the aftermarket components I used were sheet metal: Fenders, doors, hood, and all the cab rust repair panels.

    Well, I guess the new springs and hardware out back also qualify as "aftermarket" too.................
     
    Last edited: Mar 30, 2002
  4. blzn74

    blzn74 Member
    Messages: 45

    Here's a secret spy photo, alot of parts on this truck are from LMC truck catalog.[​IMG]
     
  5. MTCK

    MTCK Senior Member
    Messages: 346

    blzn74 - SOLID looking truck. I like it. If you want to see pics of mine, search back a few months and check it out, I posted about 6 pics I think of my rebuild/restoration of my 83 1/2 ton. As far as advise, slow down a little. Your lift just went from 4 to 6 inch and there are a lot of potential problems once you start getting that big. Mainly, drivetrain. If you 're going to use this truck, you're going to start puking out axles and u-joints like it's going out of style if you run much bigger than 35 inch tires. I personally think a six inch lift with 35's looks great, but if you have a lot of ponies and a heavy foot, you're going to need more beef. I'm still trying to find the right compromise for my 10 bolt axles. I think in the end I will just go for it and drup some 8 lug axles under it (been trying to avoid this as wheels and tires aren't cheap) and buy new rolling stock. Full floating 14 bolt in the back and probably a 10 bolt or dana 44 in the front. I'd like a 60 but just too expensive and I really don't use this truck very hard any more. What are you going to use the truck for? Mudding or just looking good? If you're not gunna ralley on it, then just go for it. Jack it up and slap on the biggest meats you can find.

    Marcus
     
  6. blzn74

    blzn74 Member
    Messages: 45

    Thanks for the complement, Marcus, I totally agree with you, I was running 8" lift with 35"tires, Half ton axles just dont cut it , I snapped the stock rear axle and I opted to go for a little more heavy duty, 14bolt ff in the rear and 10bolt Dana 44 in the front, One thing to think of also is Differential Gears, I had 3:73 in the half ton with 35's real sluggish off the line, 3/4 axles have 4:10 's ,a little better,(Untill I went with 44" tires) I currently have 4:88's and am planning to go to 5:29's when I get my (other)Dana 44 front axle turned up.
     
  7. Hoggin GMC

    Hoggin GMC Junior Member
    Messages: 13

    I plan on using the truck for daily driving,off roading, and a nice work truck. I have to many plans for the truck with not much money,but plan on building with a budget in mind. I plan on keeping 10 bolt rear but plan on gears and beefing up the axles. Thanks. Write me on what you think.

    Thanks
     
  8. 75

    75 PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,382

    Based on the other questions about lift & tire size, and the fact that you plan on doing some 'wheeling, I think the 10-bolt rear axle might prove to be a little weak.

    What sort of work will the truck be doing? If it's going to be plowing, again the lift & tires that will do well for off-road will be less suitable for pushing snow. In the end it will come down to a compromise between the various uses.
     
  9. Hoggin GMC

    Hoggin GMC Junior Member
    Messages: 13

    Nah, no snow plowing. Just trips to the junk yard . But, other than that just a truck to have fun with.
     
  10. GLS

    GLS Senior Member
    Messages: 248

    Where did you find a drop of that length blzn!?!
     
  11. 75

    75 PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,382

    In that case, lift and some beefy tires won't be a problem. :)

    I admit to being a little :confused: by you saying "I plan on keeping 10 bolt rear but plan on gears and beefing up the axles"

    Simplest way to beef up the axles IMO is swap a set from a 3/4-ton in there - that will get you a 14-bolt out back and a Dana 44 up front. If they are axles from an '80's truck be sure the rear axle is the 14 bolt or "full floater" style, you can tell that one by the hub that sticks out past the centre of the wheel. 3/4-ton GM's from the '80's came in what I call a "light" and "heavy" version. Heavy's what you want.

    Dana 60 up front? Nice to have but not 100% necessary, and as Marcus points they're expensive and not easy to find - especially in a Single Rear Wheel (SRW) version: 1-ton 4x4's from that era seem more common in dually pickup and C&C versions.

    Useful piece of info: As far as driveline, brake and chassis parts go the 1/2-ton and 3/4-ton GM's from that era for the most part use the same components. Obviously the rotors and drums will be different - 6 lug on a 1/2 ton, 8 on a 3/4 but the calipers, brake hoses etc are the same, tie rod, drag link, steering stabilizer, ball joints - same, U-joints - same. It's at the 1-ton series that most of the parts are different - and more expen$ive :( (I know - I've bought quite a few for the K-35 project so far.................)
     
    Last edited: Apr 1, 2002
  12. MTCK

    MTCK Senior Member
    Messages: 346

    Since you haven't bought the wheels or tires yet, now is the time to do the drive train for this reason: if you go ahead, lift the truck, drop a bunch of money on the tires and wheels, and then start blowing up axles and what not left and right, you won't be able to keep the wheels and tires (different bolt pattern, and wheel diameter) that you just spent all the money on with your new axles. Something else to keep in mind is that if you get a 1 ton single rear wheel full floating 14 bolt, I think the springs are in a different spot than the 3/4 and 1/2 tons. Rob? This would just mean that you'd have to move the pads, and maybe the shock mounts too. Not too big of a deal. Sometimes people get lucky with 10-bolts, but not often. If you're going to spend the money to regear and "beef" you will be miles ahead to just get some heavier used axles. I investigated regearing and you're going to spend probably close to a thousand dollars just for the R&P's, install kits, and the labor to put them in. That's your axles right there, and then you have the stronger pieces.

    Marcus
     
  13. blzn74

    blzn74 Member
    Messages: 45

    this really is off post topic, but I m assuming the drop you are talking about is my hitch, I had it custom made for a 18" lift. about 200bucks. To Answer another question, it cost me $1400 to have gears installed, in 3/4 ton axles.
     
  14. 75

    75 PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,382

    Good thinking Marcus ("Since you haven't bought the wheels or tires yet............")

    I just now measured across the springs on a 3/4-ton and a 1/2-ton, both were 1980 trucks, and they measured the same. Shock mounts were the same as well - the frame has a formed recess to clear the shock. The U-bolts are different, the 1/2-ton has the plate on top while it's on the bottom on the 3/4-ton.

    My dually is about 3" narrower across the springs and the rear shock mounts are different - inboard. So again the big differences appear at the 1-ton series. For example, 1/2 and 3/4 ton frames are 6" deep along the straight run, 1-tons are 8" deep.

    There will likely be some minor "adapting" required to do an axle swap but nothing too major.
     
  15. Hoggin GMC

    Hoggin GMC Junior Member
    Messages: 13

    Thanks for the info. It will help me plan and build my truck better.