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Anti-unlocked brakes

Discussion in 'Chevy Trucks' started by icebladez, Oct 20, 2005.

  1. icebladez

    icebladez Member
    from sask
    Messages: 74

    Is it a safe thing to unhook the antilock brakes on my 1995 Blazer?..i like the feeling like i'm in control of a vechile when in a icy situation..will this act hamper other electronic avenues?..any response greatly looked forward to!!

    :redbounce purplebou :bluebounc
     
  2. repo_man62

    repo_man62 Senior Member
    Messages: 502

    NOT...Why do you think they put them on?
     
  3. icebladez

    icebladez Member
    from sask
    Messages: 74

    Actually it's my mothers Blazer..i tried to tell her how to work them,just push hard, but she almost gets into a jam when the pedal pulsates back at her,,she's set on someone unhooking them as she doesn't want to learn the art of the "anti" system....STILL looking for intelligent feedback that can provide me with some though on "why" it is an unsafe thing then Repo...:nono: ...they put a few stupid things on cars these days that i say do suck...agreed?
     
  4. Vaughn Schultz

    Vaughn Schultz PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,565

    With all do respect, is it safe for her to drive on snow and ice:confused:
     
  5. repo_man62

    repo_man62 Senior Member
    Messages: 502

    Hope that wasn't directed at me! Has she ever rode in a semi in an ice storm? Tell her to give it a try sometime, WITHOUT anti-lock system on it. Or better yet...have her be in front of one that doesn't have it and see how many people are killed!:angel: I'd love to be the hiway patrol that does her fatality accident scene...and finds out some IDIOT disconnected the ABS.
     
  6. derekbroerse

    derekbroerse 2000 Club Member
    Messages: 2,377

    Braking is more effective if the wheels are still turning, hence the point of ABS. She needs to understand that she can still steer and avoid if the ABS works, even with her foot planted firmly on the floor. Try that with the ABS unplugged.

    My honest opinion: Disconnecting the ABS system is a very foolish thing to do.

    Tell her the pulsation is the foot massager kicking in. Tell her its standard equipment on upscale vehicles ;)
     
  7. icebladez

    icebladez Member
    from sask
    Messages: 74

    Braking is more effective if the wheels are still turning, hence the point of ABS. She needs to understand that she can still steer and avoid if the ABS works, even with her foot planted firmly on the floor. Try that with the ABS unplugged.

    My honest opinion: Disconnecting the ABS system is a very foolish thing to do.

    Tell her the pulsation is the foot massager kicking in. Tell her its standard equipment on upscale vehicles
    __________________
    :waving: :waving: :waving:

    "FINALLY"!!

    Thank you bro derekbroerse for answering those "there's no such thing as a dumb question"-types with direct unmocking greatness!!..i would readily help if i knew it was you that needed a tug out of unforgiven ditch!!..so simple?..!!..yet..minnows bite too!!hee
     
  8. RYDER

    RYDER Senior Member
    Messages: 281

    It is ok to disable the ABS brakes as long as everyone who drives it knows that there are disable, So thay know how to bake if thay need to lock them up. It wiil NOT hert anything. I used to be an ASE certified autobody tech., and auto parts specialist.
     
  9. sixspeed

    sixspeed Senior Member
    Messages: 306

    It is possible to disconnect them since the ABS is a failsafe system and the vehicle will brake without them.

    Is it safe - absolutely not. They lessen stopping distance on all materials except a gravel road (where gravel buildup in front of the tires enhances braking). Disconnecting them lessens control in panic stops when the vehicle may be sliding out of control and your brain may not tell the right foot what to do on the brakes fast enough.

    Is it legal - probably not and and if you cause or are in a fatal accident your accident will go from an accident to a homicide because your negligence created a hazardous situation which may have caused the fatality. Disconnecting them and having a (God-forbid) fatality will mean you will not screw up your insurance you'll likely go to jail.

    Bottom line - as bad as they may seem, a vehicle will stop better with them than without.
     
  10. icebladez

    icebladez Member
    from sask
    Messages: 74

    wow..homicide..why isn't this kind of information distributed widely for the masses..at least now i can give my mother this wealth of information to consider since she is so gung ho on the thought!..thanks everyone!!:)
     
  11. sixspeed

    sixspeed Senior Member
    Messages: 306

    Actually it's a basic legal principle - if you do something negligent (stupid, risky or dangerous) and you injure or kill someone, it is a crime. Like as if the plow mfr says what plow to use and the dealer says don't go bigger cause it's not approved for your truck and you go bigger anyway. If for some reason the extre weight were to cause something to break and an injury or death was to occur, you could be held criminally negligent... :(
     
    Last edited: Oct 21, 2005
  12. GetMore

    GetMore Senior Member
    Messages: 179

    I know I wouldn't have minded having an override switch on my ABS system last year.
    I was driving in a snowstorm and I hit the brakes coming up to a light and the damn truck just kept going. If I didn't have ABS it would have built up a wedge of snow in front of the tire and stopped. (Same thing as the gravel mentioned previously.)

    So far ABS is one for one with me. One time I used it and I would have been better off without, and one time I used it and it may have saved me from an accident. I don't have much time behind the wheel of ABS vehicles, unless you count malfunctioning brakes as anti-lock. :dizzy:
     
  13. derekbroerse

    derekbroerse 2000 Club Member
    Messages: 2,377

    I don't think you can stop any vehicle faster in snowy/icy conditions without ABS as you can with it. Official testing has always shown that you can stop quicker and in better control with ABS, but that doesn't make it a cure-all, you still need to drive for conditions. You probably couldn't have stopped anyways, ABS or not.

    As for a wedge of snow, I don't buy that for a second. Not sure I believe it on gravel either, as gravel tends to roll like little ball bearings.

    Just my two cents...
     
  14. GetMore

    GetMore Senior Member
    Messages: 179

    derekbroerse, I would say that I know, but I haven't actually done a test with and without ABS on the same vehicle, so I won't.
    However, I have driven the same gravel road a number of times, and when I took the ABS vehicle down it and tried to stop it basically just kept going. Sure, it was easy to steer and control, but the brakes were barely doing anything. Without ABS I would have just dug in. Stopping distance would have still been longer than a nice paved road, but it would have stopped much sooner. I would say the ABS increased stopping distance by three car lengths from 30 mph.
    As for my experience in the snow, perhaps you are right, perhaps not. I can't say, as I don't have any way to make a direct comparison. Something as small as tires could have made all the difference in keeping the ABS from activating so soon. I know my old truck would have stopped much sooner. I also know that I don't like not having control. Just standing on the brake pedal and having the truck just keep going was not fun.
     
  15. joe_padavano

    joe_padavano Member
    Messages: 68

    ABS is for control, not braking

    OK, time for a simple experiment. Take one of the tires off your car. Roll it on any surface you care to. Now drag it without rolling. Which one has less resistance? Which one will stop in a shorter distance?

    Compared to rolling tires, locked tires will stop in a shorter distance on virtually ANY surface - the one exception may be water, where a rolling tire will channel the water away from the tire while a locked tire will probably build up a wedge of water. All of this is a moot point, however, since the purpose of ABS is NOT to shorten braking distances, it's to provide directional control.

    The problem is that once a tire stops rolling, it also stops providing directional control. Lock the tires while braking and the vehicle is going to keep moving in the direction is was pointed - you will not be able to steer around the thing in front of you that caused you to brake in the first place. In addition, there is now nothing preventing the vehicle from spinning or otherwise losing directional control. If you lock the tires while cornering, the vehicle will cease cornering and go straight in the direction of the velocity vector at the time of locking the tires. That's usually the guardrail.

    Before ABS, drivers were taught "stab and steer", the plan being to pump the brake pedal while turning to maintain directional control with maximum braking force. Unfortunately 99.9% of drivers would simply mash the brake pedal with no thought and just skid into the thing they were trying to avoid, so we now have ABS to do the thinking for them. Unfortunately most drivers still don't know that they can steer while the ABS is functioning.

    It also doesn't matter whether the car is on dry pavement or snow and ice. The principle is the same, only the coefficient of friction is lower. That means that the tires are going to lock up sooner on slippery surfaces, increasing the probability that the vehicle will skid into the obstacle in front of it.

    If after all this your mother still thinks she needs the ABS disconnected, I suggest that you enroll her (and probably yourself) in one of the accident avoidance training courses like those offered by Skip Barber or Bondourant. These courses teach a driver how to avoid accidents in emergency situations and probably should be mandatory for licensing.

    Joe Padavano