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Another Salt/Concrete question.

Discussion in 'Ice Management' started by jjmcnace, Dec 28, 2008.

  1. jjmcnace

    jjmcnace Member
    from Iowa
    Messages: 64

    I'm using Miracle Melt from Sam's Club on a parking lot. The concrete of this parking lot is probably 10-15 yrs old and has expose aggregate on the surface. Should I be worried about this concrete spalling. This ice melt is a blend of calcium, magnesium and sodium.
     
  2. elite1msmith

    elite1msmith 2000 Club Member
    from chicago
    Messages: 2,762

    anything besides normall concrete i would go 100% cal
     
  3. cretebaby

    cretebaby PlowSite Veteran
    Messages: 4,162

    if the aggregate is already showing i wouldnt be to concerned about spalling
     
  4. Runner

    Runner Senior Member
    Messages: 957

    I agree. If the aggregate is showing, it's shot anyway.
     
  5. jjmcnace

    jjmcnace Member
    from Iowa
    Messages: 64

    Another Salt/Contrete question *Update*

    Here are some pics of the concrete in question.[​IMG]

    This is an employee parking lot with 20 parking spaces in it.[​IMG]

    Here is what most of the concrete looks like.[​IMG]

    The first two photos were taken in the same spot and it seems like this much be much lower grade concrete that the third picture. Let me know what you guys think. I will say that the concrete in the top two pictures just started spalling last winter. We have had 2 real icy winters in a row. The property manager called me 2 times last year about slip and falls. Since then I have applied salt to the lots to make them as slip free as possible. I just don't want to ruin the concrete and have them think that its my fault and try to get me to replace it.
     
  6. cretebaby

    cretebaby PlowSite Veteran
    Messages: 4,162

    Your first two pixs dont works.......Doesnt matter

    Salt the hell out of it Salt isnt going to ruin that crete

    And they cant prove it was you if it did
     
  7. camconcrete

    camconcrete Senior Member
    Messages: 199

    if it has held up that good for 10-15 years with heavy salting, I wouldn't be too concerned about it.

    Cretebaby's right, even if it did break down anymore........there's no way they can blame that on you
     
  8. camconcrete

    camconcrete Senior Member
    Messages: 199

    if it has held up that good for 10-15 years with heavy salting, I wouldn't be too concerned about it.

    Cretebaby's right, even if it did break down anymore........there's no way they can blame that on you
     
  9. jjmcnace

    jjmcnace Member
    from Iowa
    Messages: 64

    It has not been salted heavily for 10-15 yrs to my knowledge. That is the approx age of the concrete. I just started servicing this property 2 yrs ago and I knew the guy who did it before me and he NEVER salted it to my knowledge. He just sanded it. The problem has been the last few years have been very ice with the large temperature swings. The reason I salt it know is because the property manager doesn't like the sand as it tracks indoors badly.

    Does anyone have concrete on their lots that looks like this?

    I should add that I spread 600 lbs of Ice melt that is a blend of CaCl, MgCl and NaCl after each snowfall after I plow the lots. It is approx. one acre. Just wondering if I should switch to straight NaCl maybe it would attack the concrete less.
     
    Last edited: Jan 1, 2009
  10. Jay brown

    Jay brown PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,783

    you should see some of our concrete lots...they completely are destroyed at the butt joints and flake on the top....we salted the crap out of one and it was only 6 months old.... that's what happens when a girl falls and breaks her leg...i tried to tell the owner not to salt, but he was afraid of getting sued
     
  11. jjmcnace

    jjmcnace Member
    from Iowa
    Messages: 64

    Here's pics 1 & 2 again[​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  12. lawnprolawns

    lawnprolawns Senior Member
    Messages: 965

    Is he worried about the concrete? Even if he is, I'm sure he's more concerned about liability. I'd write up a contract that says contractor (you) is not responsible for damages to concrete due to salt. Or, if he wants, spread straight CaCl2, which is supposed to be better for concrete.. just make sure to charge for it.