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Airbags maybe?

Discussion in 'Ram Trucks' started by CornerStoneProp, Jun 18, 2014.

  1. CornerStoneProp

    CornerStoneProp Senior Member
    Messages: 222

    I finally got the mount installed on my brand new 2014 Ram 2500 CCSB with the 6.7 Cummins motor. I love the truck it runs strong and smooth, but man I am not used to the front end drop with my plow on it. In V mode it scrapes the ground which I am sure I could adjust the chain, but would rather fix the problem then work around it. I know that my plow is a little heavy for the front and will have plenty of ballast in the bed which I did not have when I hooked up to test today for the first time. What is everyone running to help with the front end sag with all that metal up front? I was leaning towards some Firestone airbags which helped my Ford before. The drop is much more pronounced on the Ram!
     
  2. gc3

    gc3 Senior Member
    Messages: 713

    Timbrens in the front help mine out. You need to have the ballast in the truck you plan to use, then adjust your plow if needed
     
  3. jhenderson9196

    jhenderson9196 Senior Member
    Messages: 615

    Put the balast in before you make any changes.
     
  4. basher

    basher PlowSite Fanatic
    from 19707
    Messages: 8,992

    Counterweight the truck and assure the wings are adjusted to contact the ground though their complete range of travel before you change anything.
     
  5. CornerStoneProp

    CornerStoneProp Senior Member
    Messages: 222

    What do you guys use for ballast? I was thinking about sand bags anything easier? I always just used a good scoop or two of snow from a skidsteer but that ends up being a pita to empty when it freezes.
     
  6. gc3

    gc3 Senior Member
    Messages: 713

    I use 70 pound sandbags. A 2x6 in the back holds them right in place.
     
  7. mega10cab

    mega10cab Senior Member
    Messages: 192

    I run a 8" boss super duty straight blade on my 2010 megacab short bed cummins. I run 800lbs ballast and have no issues. I run timbrens in the rear since I tow a heavy camper too. Timbrens in the front may help you out with that heavy of a plow. I have a leveling kit on the front of my truck so it doesn't sag much.
     
  8. CornerStoneProp

    CornerStoneProp Senior Member
    Messages: 222

    Going to take your advise and add something heavy. Then look into beefed up springs I didn't buy a truck for ride quality I got it to work.
     
  9. jhenderson9196

    jhenderson9196 Senior Member
    Messages: 615

    I run sand bags from Home Depot. Easy in and out, plus sand if I get stuck. Look at your front springs and read the paper tags. They have a part number. I changed mine out for dodge springs that end in 988. They are the heaviest dodge makes. They hold my 9.2 VXT nicely, and don't ride too bad. I'm not sure they will fit your year but it's worth looking into. Use your spring number, changing the last 3 digits to 988 and see what happens. They are much less expensive than aftermarket.
     
  10. JustJeff

    JustJeff 2000 Club Member
    Messages: 2,034

    I don't know why you have so much front end drop. Mind drops roughly one inch when I lift the plow. And my plow weighs a thousand pounds. I've got timbrens, but those are really just a bump stop, they don't alter sag in the front end.
     
  11. CornerStoneProp

    CornerStoneProp Senior Member
    Messages: 222

    The timbrens are a large bump stop so when lots of weight sit on the axle, it stops the rest of the spring travel. I need to check the springs for what number they are, but it is plow prepped with the 10000GVW door tag so I was under the understanding that was the highest in the 2500. Good ideas thanks!
     
  12. jhenderson9196

    jhenderson9196 Senior Member
    Messages: 615

    Snowplow prep gives heavier springs but which ones depends on truck configuration. I have never seen 988 springs on a stock truck, but they are an over the counter item. As the last 3 numbers on the spring go up so does the wt rating.
     
  13. CornerStoneProp

    CornerStoneProp Senior Member
    Messages: 222

    You were right they are not the 988 spring. Do you mind if I ask about what you paid for the upgraded springs?
     
  14. JustJeff

    JustJeff 2000 Club Member
    Messages: 2,034

    If you're doing what you're claiming to do, by putting a scoop or two of sand in the back, you've got weight, BUT NOT ballast. Ballast has to be behind the rear axle. There is a big difference.
     
  15. jhenderson9196

    jhenderson9196 Senior Member
    Messages: 615

    If my memory serves me, it was less than $300 for the pair.
     
    Last edited: Jun 24, 2014
  16. basher

    basher PlowSite Fanatic
    from 19707
    Messages: 8,992

    Sorry; right idea wrong terminology.
    you put two scoops of sand in the bed you have Ballast. Ballast is material that is used to provide stability to a vehicle or structure.

    One scoop of sand BEHIND the rear axle is a counter weight and would be more effective then two scoops centered in the bed.

    If you place the load as a counter weight you only need 600/800 lbs, you don't need to carry all the extra weight placing the load as ballast requires, it will help traction but it increases your fuel usage, and works the truck drive train and brakes harder.
     
  17. JustJeff

    JustJeff 2000 Club Member
    Messages: 2,034

    Okay Basher, help me here. I respect everything you say, so I'm not going to argue with you, but I was under the impression that ballast IS counter-weight. Not true?
     
  18. basher

    basher PlowSite Fanatic
    from 19707
    Messages: 8,992

    true enough, however while a counter weight is always ballast, ballast is not always a counter weight.;)

    i.e. a full toolbox would be ballast but unless it was placed behind the rear axles it is not a counter weight.
     
  19. JustJeff

    JustJeff 2000 Club Member
    Messages: 2,034

    Okay, thank you, because I was under the impression that ballast and counter weight were the same, and apparently that's not true.
     
  20. basher

    basher PlowSite Fanatic
    from 19707
    Messages: 8,992

    I sometimes use my plow as a counter weight.

    Making spreader runs when I'm overfilling a 2 yard hopper in the back of a pick up I'll carry a blade to counter the excess weight in the rear.