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Advice on flatbed

Discussion in 'Commercial Snow Removal' started by Moose's Mowing, Jan 22, 2014.

  1. Moose's Mowing

    Moose's Mowing Senior Member
    from SE PA
    Messages: 198

    I have an 04 Chevy 2500HD. Reg cab. Long story short, a lady hit me the other day and smashed up the bed pretty bad. Prob not gonna be able to fix it, but not positive. If the shop says it needs a new bed, should I look around or build a flatbed? Not sure if having a flatbed has any advantages to me. Only thing I can think of is better visibility when plowing and it'll make loading pallets of stuff easier. I don't haul many pallets though. Maybe 3-4 times a year. On the other hand, this truck sees an occasional load of mulch or stone and lots of firewood. It's also my mowing truck. I'm thinking if the flatbed had stake pockets, I could build a few different setups for hauling different stuff. Like one taller setup for bulkier items such as mulch/firewood and also a shorter setup for normal mowing/plowing routes.

    Thoughts on the pros & cons of the flatbed? I like the way they look, not real sure if the functionality would do a ton of good over a normal pickup bed. I like those aluminum ones, but I'm setup really well at my shop, I'm also a metal shop teacher at a high school so I have access to some nice equipment there if need be. Shouldnt be that hard to make one myself either. Lemme know what you guys think
     
  2. TJS

    TJS PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,339

    Don’t really have any pros or cons. It depends what you want to use it for. Also if you are going to make a flatbed, do yourself a favor and make it dump. You may not think you need a dumper but there will be that one time you wish you had one where you have a load of wood, mulch, etc on it and are dead tired and don’t want to manually unload it. I made both of my flatbeds I made dump and really at the time had no use for a dumper but now I used it all the time. I also have a winch set up near the front of the bed so if I need to pull something up the bed heavy I tilt the bed a little and use ramps and pull it up. I just did this picking up a fully dresses small block chevy for my boat.

    My factory bed had a big dent and the typical rot above the wheel wells (smart engineer who decided to put foam between the pinch welds). It would have cost almost as much as me building a flat bed so it was a no brainer. You can see my build as there is a link in my signature. Plus I have many YT vids on it.

    How do you become a metal shop teacher. Do you need a teaching cert for this. Sounds like a job for me. I know in CT. you need a teaching cert and it is like 2 or more years of classes.
     
  3. jasonv

    jasonv PlowSite.com Addict
    from kannada
    Messages: 1,114

    She hit you? Her fault? Insurance pays? Or gentleman's agreement to preserve her insurance rates?

    If insurance is to be involved, have at it. The amount of your repair doesn't impact her rates, only the fact that she has a claim against her.

    Now if insurance pays, you may or may not be able to work out a deal that fixes up the truck DIFFERENT THAN IT WAS BEFORE. I.e., they may insist on repairing it to pre-collision shape... OR, they may be happy to let you do something different, but likely only if it costs them significantly less than they would be otherwise paying out.

    Regarding the choice between flatbed and pickup... very personal. But remember that the bed surface of a flatbed is HIGHER than the bed surface of a pickup bed, since it has to clear the wheels.
     
  4. Moose's Mowing

    Moose's Mowing Senior Member
    from SE PA
    Messages: 198

    Im in PA, but pretty much every state is the same. Gotta get a degree in "Technology Education" Most people know this as "shop class" they changed the name to make it sound fancier. In PA, there's a temporary teachers certification that you get when you're done with college. Then you gotta take at least 24 graduate level credits within 6 years of starting teaching full time to become permanently certified. Most masters degrees are 30 credits, so it makes sense to just get a masters right away, it's only two extra courses.

    I technically teach "Technology Education" which is an elective course. It's different than Vo-Tech. Tech Ed covers a ton of stuff like wood shop, metal shop, auto shop, energy & power sources, electronics, robotics, graphic design, printing, photography, hydraulics/pneumatics, drafting, CAD and CAM, CNC machining and the list goes on. I'm certified to teach all that crap, but I'm not very good at some of the areas I focused mainly on materials, electronics & Drafting.

    Vo-Tech is more trade specific like HVAC, masonry, and so on. Vo Tech's hire guys right out of the field and get them certified to teach. If I had to do it over, I wouldn't have been a teacher. But I guess everyone says that about their careers.......
     
  5. Antlerart06

    Antlerart06 PlowSite Veteran
    Messages: 3,437

    I wont own another work truck with a bed on it Flatbed all the way Who needs to go to tail gate to unload a blower grab it from the side

    One thing with a flatbed when you at a carwash you see a lot of the frame easier to clean it
    If you run a V box there a lot more room on the sides Since there no fender wells in the way

    You could build one and save some $$$ but sometimes a person don't have the time to build Faster to buy it and be done with it.
    Good luck
     
  6. jb1390

    jb1390 Senior Member
    Messages: 710

    Flatbeds are nice, if you like the way they look. I do, and the increased functionality is awesome. I concur with TJS, if you are going to go that route, make it dump. I can help you with angles and what not if you would like to use a straight cylinder instead of shelling the money out for a scissor-send me a PM if you want.

    I have a thread "2500hd flatbed build", if you want to see some pictures of mine. Still not quite done, but it's getting there. I built mine much, much stronger than you would get from a place that builds them-but I move logs on a regular basis, and the sheet metal sides on my old bed bent outward from the load.
     
  7. beanz27

    beanz27 Senior Member
    Messages: 984

    Visibility is better, its just nicer to have a flatbed. Nice when I haul a skid I can put the blower on my bed and bucket on loader....dont have to unhook trailer to hook to the blower
     
  8. Antlerart06

    Antlerart06 PlowSite Veteran
    Messages: 3,437

    Isnt a scissor lift better, more stable on a small dump and can lift more weight vs a single ram
     
  9. r.renterprises

    r.renterprises Member
    Messages: 31

    My v box Salter was bending my stock box couldn't get thr the tailgate to close any more. Switched to a flat bed. Works muck better for plowing not a big deal if u get to close to some thing and nice to haul stuff. The next truck I buy im going to build my own out of stainless with a wooden deck. Not a fan of having to paint it all the time
     
  10. Brian Young

    Brian Young PlowSite Veteran
    Messages: 3,382

    We have both and I will say a flat bed has its pros and cons, more pros. We have one on a F350 SRW and the bed is fairly big, it sticks out past the cab about 6-8" either side and it's about 10+ feet long so theres a lot more room than a standard p/u bed. We just made sides for it just under the height of the cab and the rear doors are barn style. The stake pocket uprights came with the truck and are made from steel so its plenty sturdy when 6-7 yards of mulch is pushing against it. I love that the v box goes on and off very easily and more visibility when plowing. One of the biggest cons with ours is the lack of really securing anything on it besides the v box. We run 4- 6,000lb ratchet straps to hold the v box to the bed in a X pattern and the ends go on the outside of the stake pockets so theres no way to even make short bed sides for it but thats fine with me, it's much easier hosing all the salt off. Theres about 2.5ft between the front of the v box and the cab so we secure things between there if needed like a buck, a doe and ice fishing sled full of ice fishing stuff,lol. I would say flat bed all the way.
     
  11. Antlerart06

    Antlerart06 PlowSite Veteran
    Messages: 3,437

    I hate to paint I found out the best thing spray in bed liner You do that you'll never need to paint
     
  12. Brian Young

    Brian Young PlowSite Veteran
    Messages: 3,382

    One other thing, if you do get a flat bed make sure you seal up the marker lights if it has any. Those stupid 2" marker lights only plug in with 2 tiny terminals and they rot out within a year or so. Our flat bed is our salt truck so as you can imagine things like that get rotted pretty quick, we just took all of ours out for inspection (in PA, if lights are there, they have to work and this being on a p/u style vs. a dual rear wheel f350 its considered "novelty lights" and they can be removed all together and still pass inspection). This summer it comes off for sandblast, repainted and all new lights.....this otta be fun!
     
  13. jb1390

    jb1390 Senior Member
    Messages: 710

    The weight it can lift obviously depends on the size of the cylinder, but also geometry. A scissor will not necessarily lift more. Yes they tend to be more stable, though i think that's mostly a wash having installed both. A straight lift is simpler to figure out when you want to customize how steep you want it, and how much weight. My old truck would lift around 5000 pounds, to a 70 degree dump angle. Nothing ever got stuck in that bed. Used a 3.5 x 24 cylinder i believe.
     
  14. Antlerart06

    Antlerart06 PlowSite Veteran
    Messages: 3,437

    Yes but scissor lift can lift more with less effort

    My old grain trucks one is twin ram lift and other one is a scissor lift Both are PTO and twin ram lifts with a full load you have to really give the rpms 3k and scissor lift can do it at 1500 rpms
    Both is rated to lift the same but at different rpms
     
  15. TJS

    TJS PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,339

    Whatever you do. Do not get a pierce kit.
     
  16. jb1390

    jb1390 Senior Member
    Messages: 710

    Like i said, it all depends on the geometry. Your statement that scissor can lift more with less effort is not necessarily true. It may be true in your case, but not in every case.