1. Welcome to PlowSite. Notice a fresh look and new features? It’s now easier to share photos and videos, find popular topics fast, and enjoy expanded user profiles. If you have any questions, click HELP at the top or bottom of any page, or send an email to help@plowsite.com. We welcome your feedback.

    Dismiss Notice

99 Dodge 3500

Discussion in 'Ram Trucks' started by Smilingreen, Oct 13, 2003.

  1. Smilingreen

    Smilingreen Junior Member
    Messages: 7

    Hey guys, I am new to this board. Lots of good info. Got 1 question. Or maybe two or three. I have a 99 2wd Dodge 3500/Cummins 24v turbo-diesel and a 8' x 12' flatbed on the back. I have just purchased a used 8' Meyers poly plow with c60 pump.

    Question #1: Do I need to do anything to the front end (springs) of my truck for weight compensation of the plow?

    Question #2: Will this combo work in our area. I live in middle Tennessee where we may have up to a 3" snow fall at the max. All of my commercial accounts are on flat areas. ( I plowed last year with my tractor and a 6' grader blade. Worked great, but I froze my butt off plowing 48 hours straight!!)

    Question #3: What type of de-icer spreader can I put on the back of the truck? 8' x 12' flatbed. I have seen the receiver hitch spreaders for pickup truck beds or tailgates. I have a flat bed truck. Will a receiver hitch type spreader work on the back of my truck?
     
  2. micah79

    micah79 Senior Member
    Messages: 303

    I would use a v box spreader. 3500 front suspension should be fine, but people will probably recomend timbrens. Your set up will be more than enough. Hills will give you a lot of trouble with 2wd. I'd put a v box on the flatbed for weight, and stick to flat surfaces.
     
  3. Smilingreen

    Smilingreen Junior Member
    Messages: 7

    Oh, forgot to add....my truck weighs in empty at 6100 pounds. Any change?
     
  4. micah79

    micah79 Senior Member
    Messages: 303

    You will have even more trouble up hills the more you weigh. It should be a tank though on level ground. The v box will hold more material than a tailgate spreader and it should be more durable. I guess it just depends on how many acres you plow in a storm. Figure on using about 500 lb of salt per acre. The tailgate will prob only hold 600lb at best. The v box will do a ton. Less filling of the spreader is more $$$.
     
  5. micah79

    micah79 Senior Member
    Messages: 303

    I'm sorry I forgot to answer the other questions. Timbrens would be a good idea i suppose. The are pretty cheap. (around $160) RPM sales sells them on here. They help stabalize the load and help with front end wear and tear. I have never seen a tailgate or receiver spreader on a flatbed. They usually use v box spreaders. Do you have a pintle hitch or receiver?
     
  6. Smilingreen

    Smilingreen Junior Member
    Messages: 7

    I have a receiver hitch.

    Dave
     
  7. micah79

    micah79 Senior Member
    Messages: 303

    I guess you could do the receiver mount spreader then. It just depends on how much salt you use per event.
     
  8. Smilingreen

    Smilingreen Junior Member
    Messages: 7

    Well, being here in Tennessee, we don't really have that much cold weather. In most cases, if you can get the snow off the pavement at night, by 9 or 10 in the morning, the sun has cleared off any remaining ice or snow deposits. We have mild winter temps here, usually average of 40 to 50's in the winter. So the frost line usually only is about 2 inches deep when it does get cold enough to snow. We do get lots of ground bucking because of this.
    Thats why I was considering using a receiver hitch type spreader. I would spread deicer on the main drags through the parking lots, where the snow may have been packed for a few hours. For weight on the back of the flat bed, I was going to have 2 skids of de-icer sitting on the back. I have 40" siderails that drop in all around the bed.

    Dave
     
  9. micah79

    micah79 Senior Member
    Messages: 303

    A receiver type spreader may be your best choice then. I was just thinking that if you used a lot of deicer then you would save a lot of money with the v box. Bulk salt is a lot cheaper, and it takes less loading time. When you check out receiver spreaders, make sure that the control wires are long enough. I think that most of them come with 18', which may not be long enough. Also I would reccomend one with variable in cab control.
     
  10. John DiMartino

    John DiMartino PlowSite.com Veteran
    Messages: 2,154

    Smiling green,your front suspension should be a solid axle,much like a Dana 60 without the center seciton,unless your truck is a converted pickup,so it should be plenty strong,I dont think you even need timbrens,you should have 046/039 or 047/046 springs already. I would put an aggressive rear tire on the truck,and add 3000 lbs minimum to the rear of the truck,preferably 4-5000 for heavy storms,the truck will push great on flat lots,just keep the front tires from dropping off edges,watch out for ice,you should be fine for the limited snow you get. Liek was mentioned i would get a V box spresder,its more versitile,and can carry a lot more material,I feel the tailgate/a,nd reciever mounted salters are mostly for small pickups,and you need the weight of a loaded v box in heavy snows.
     
  11. Smilingreen

    Smilingreen Junior Member
    Messages: 7

    Hey guys, I really appriciate all of your responses. I now just have to get a undercarriage bracket to fit my truck. The plow came off of a F350 that someone who live up north, traded when he moved to Tennessee. The truck sat on the lot for 2.5 years with the plow sitting on it. They couldn't sell the truck with the plow, so they pulled it off. The truck then sold. The plow has been sitting idle in a building at the dealership for almost 4 years. As soon as I get the under carriage bracket on my truck, I will piece together the wiring and see how well the solinoids, pump and cylinders work. Then, i will change out the Hydro fluid and get every thing set for this winter.

    Dave