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98 Gmc 3500

Discussion in 'Truck & Equipment Repair' started by kcplowmata, Oct 31, 2007.

  1. kcplowmata

    kcplowmata Senior Member
    from kc
    Messages: 174

    I have a 3500 4x4 regular wheel. The back axle seals leak and ive changed them to no end and always leak . Any ideas?
     
  2. B&B

    B&B PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 12,777

    These axle seals on the 10.5 14 bolts can be a real pain to get sealed up. I don't know any specifics as to your procedure for changing them, but they're pretty fussy about the install procedure or they will leak. The best tips I can give you are:

    First, check that the rear end breather isn't plugged up. If it is, it will push oil out the seals as it heats up. Pull the hose of the rear and blow through it to check it. Also, stick a small pick or something similar into the hose nipple on the axle to make sure it not plugged up there.

    Make dang sure the seal surface in the spindle is polished absolutely perfect without a hint of rust, grooves or pits. They like to rust pit right on the seal surface and will tear the seals up in no time. Sand the sealing surface with some crocus cloth until it's mirror smooth. Depending on how rough they are to begin with, start with some 150 grit and work you way up to at least 320 grit.Then use some 600 grit and continue to polish them until they are perfect. This is very important..

    Use a seal driver that actually fits the outside dia of the seal when you drive it into the hub cavity.This is also very important, since the seals are fairly large, it doesn't take much to distort them...and they WILL leak if they're distorted. Also make sure that the garter spring didn't fall out of the back of the seal after it's driven in. I like to pack the seal with chassis grease to help hold the garter springs in.

    Next.. setting the wheel bearing preload correctly is also very important...After you slide the hub onto the spindle (being very careful you don't bump the seal on the spindle), torque the inner nut to 50 ft lbs.Then give the hub a few spins to seat the bearings. Now re-torque it again to 50 ft lbs. Next, back the nut off just a bit and re-torque it again to 30 ft lbs and leave it there. Install the outer lock nut and lock key torquing the outer nut to a minimum of 150 ft lbs.

    Use the best seals you can find.. CR or OEM seals seem to hold up the best on these rears.
     
  3. kcplowmata

    kcplowmata Senior Member
    from kc
    Messages: 174

    wow thanks alot.. i owe you lunch if you ever get to kansas city.
     
  4. B&B

    B&B PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 12,777

    Glad to help kc, and thanks for the offer..but be forwarned..I like to eat!:D
     
  5. kcplowmata

    kcplowmata Senior Member
    from kc
    Messages: 174

    well down n deees partz weeze eats barbeequeeeee so bring it on.
     
  6. Detroitdan

    Detroitdan PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,937

    Cool, I'm going to print this out and save it for the next time I have to do mine. I've already had to do the driver's side a couple times already.
     
  7. sweetk30

    sweetk30 PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,588

    thay do make seal/speedy sleave kits that napa and others sell. so if the seal area on the spindle is real bad. you can install the speedy sleave to repair it.