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95-98 2500 Axles

Discussion in 'Ram Trucks' started by szorno, Jan 30, 2003.

  1. szorno

    szorno Senior Member
    Messages: 308

    Looking for info on Dodge 2500 (3/4 T) Axles. (95 to 98 vintage which is all I can afford)
    1) Any difference between Diesel and gas versions?

    2) IS the front axle a Dana 44, 50 or 60?

    reason- thinking of building a non-dually 1 ton from a 2500 if the front axle is heavier than a D44. Need gvw above 9500 but prefer non-dually.
    Can a 2500 be safely adapted like the Ford SD 250?
    Thanks in advance guys.
    sz
     
  2. John DiMartino

    John DiMartino PlowSite.com Veteran
    Messages: 2,154

    All 8800GVWR and higher 94+ Rams have the dana 60 front.All V8 3/4 tons use the Dana 60 rear.2500 Diesel/V10 autos use the dana 70 rear,2500 manuals use the dana 80 rear.All 3500's use the dana 80 rear.The dana 80 2500 rear is a hybrid with an 80 center section and 70 shafts and hubs.You wont find a GVWR above 8800 without a dually from Dodge in 94+ yrs.There are a few 7500GVWR 2500's out there,made before 97,they have the 60 rear and 44 front,they dropped them after 97.They were only avaialbe with a V8,all diesel/V10;s are HD's.
     
  3. wyldman

    wyldman Member
    Messages: 3,265

    No difference from gas to diesel version,except for some 94-95 LD gas models got a Dana 44,all others are a Dana 60

    No difference between a 2500 (3/4 ton) or a 3500 (1 ton) front axle either.Both have the same Dana 60,except the dually has bolted on wheel hub extensions to run the dually wheels.The front axle weight rating is 4850 Lbs.If you have a dually front diff you can just remove the extensions to use it in a non-dually application,or vice versa.They are the same diff though.

    In 2000 they upped the front axle weight rating to 5200.No changes to the diff or springs,but they added bigger front discs with dual piston calipers,to increase the stopping power.

    If you have a 2500,and want to make it a 3500,the differences are in the rear.Auto 2500 trucks have a Dana 70,manuals have the Dana 80.All 3500's have the Dana 80,with bigger rear brakes,and new rear disc in 2001.5.Biggest problem would be getting it re certified for the higher GVWR.Some places won't do it or it's very expensive.I'd just stick with the 2500,and beef up the rear a bit.
     
  4. wyldman

    wyldman Member
    Messages: 3,265

    Ya beat me to it John :)
     
  5. John DiMartino

    John DiMartino PlowSite.com Veteran
    Messages: 2,154

    Its not to often I beat you anymore Wyldman.:D .You owe me a beer :drinkup: .
     
  6. szorno

    szorno Senior Member
    Messages: 308

    Thanks guys. I knew someone around here would know. I will be hunting up a 96-98 2500 v10 or diesel, and beef up the front with airbags and the rear with extra leafs. That should allow me to safely carry my 3200 lb mag chloride tank, and front plow.
    Bingo- non-dually 1 ton. No certification required in colorado as long as I use it locally.
    Thanks again.
     
  7. wyldman

    wyldman Member
    Messages: 3,265

    Try to find a 97 or early 98 with a 12 Valve Cummins turbo diesel motor.they are the best trucks.

    Skip the airbags and just install a set of Timbren load boosters,much better,and will never wear out or leak.

    Airbags would be a better choice on the rear,istead of extra leafs.Only pump them up when needed,and keep your unloaded ride smoother.
     
  8. John DiMartino

    John DiMartino PlowSite.com Veteran
    Messages: 2,154

    SZ, do yourself a favor,skip the V10.While its a good engine,it is thirsty,i mean real thirsty.The Cummins is very economical to run,and a real workhorse.If you are carrying the plow when you have the tank full,you shouldnt need any suspension aids at all.A good set of HD shocks would be all I put on it.I put 3200+ in the bed of my short bed 2500 quad cab all the time,it sits down about 2 inches from level,but if the plow is on it sits perfectly level.I do have the camper ,and tow packages though.I still havw the original shocks with over 73K on them,they are just starting to get loose when its loaded to 11-2K lbs(plow and spreader).Wyldman is right a 12V is a much better choice97-98 is a great choice.The 24V has been great fro me too,no problems at all so far.The 24 is much snappier stock for stock.
     
  9. szorno

    szorno Senior Member
    Messages: 308

    Just a couple more thoughts. does anyone know how "bad" the gas mileage is on the V10? Thinking with auto and rural driving.
    I have also heard that when plowing lots with short pushes that backing thru diesel smoke for hours at a time gets nasty. Any comments?
    I would like the diesel for the fuel mileage but if I have to carry an O-2 tank for me it is not worth it. My elevation is 8500 ft so the turbo is attractive.
    Comments... ???:D
     
  10. Nozzleman

    Nozzleman Senior Member
    Messages: 267

    I plow with a 2500 Diesel and yes you do get some diesel odor when backing up. However, I find that it's not unbearable, especially when you compare it to the great fuel milage and awsome low end power the Cummins offers.
     
  11. John DiMartino

    John DiMartino PlowSite.com Veteran
    Messages: 2,154

    szorno,funy you said that about the smell.I never smeel the exhaust from my truck.Not once.and I have good sized injectors in mine.Maybe my nose is desensitized from all that diesel smell/smoke:D .As for mileage,figure double with a diesel in most workign situations,and abotu 1.5 times the mileage on the highway.My GMC 's 350 runs thru 15 gallons of fuel in 8 hrs of plowing,pushign a 7.5 ft blade.The Cummins is pushing a 9'2" V blade and gets about 7-8 gallons in the same amount of time pushing.I never shut the diesel down either,it runs the whole time.Towing mileage will be double also or darn close.The V10's have quicker off the line acceleration,very quick,and responsive,the Cummins takes longer to get going,but once its up to speed it is every bit as strong as the V10,and stronger towing.The diesel can be made very powerful for a under 1500 bucks.At 8500 ft the deisel will really shine,the V10 will be gasping,while the turbo is not affected nearly as much.
     
  12. fordman

    fordman Senior Member
    Messages: 327

    I plow with a diesel as well and have never really noticed the smell when plowing except for maybe the odd time, but it wasn't unbearable. I don't think you would ever need an O2 tank.:D
     
  13. Nozzleman

    Nozzleman Senior Member
    Messages: 267

    All right, I don't want to sound like a weenie so let me regroup my thoughts on diesel oder. If I am plowing with the passengers side window down then I may get a diesel oder when backing up. So now you wondering "why keep the window down then." Well theres only one good answer and that would be "cause I like the to hear the exhaust note of my Cummins." :D :D
     
  14. Alan

    Alan PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,393

    Something to keep in mind with any heavily loaded SRW pickups is tire capacity. Either of the real workhorse tires, 245/75 or 235/85-16 max out at 3040 lbs in the E load range. I have not been able to find tires rated for any more than that.

    In my case, 8600 GVW K3500 SRW, carrying a vee box, I am 200 lbs under my allowable tire capacity with 1.2 tons in the box and my vee plow on the front. I got a weight on the rear axle for my information. At that point I am also approximately 1,000 lbs over GVW. I'm less concerned with being over gross than I am about being over the tire capacity.

    Tires are good for 12,160 lbs. I had one load of sand that came off the scales at 12,100, I didn't get an axle weight on that one, but it was obviously more than the truck was comfortable with.

    I would think that your liquid tank, when filled, is a little heavier than my vee box with 2400 lbs in it. Add in the tendency of liquid to slosh and I can't hep but think you could have a handful on any single tire now available.
     
  15. szorno

    szorno Senior Member
    Messages: 308

    Thanks to all of you for the diesel feedback. I guess, with the windows closed, the fumes are not much. Good info.
    As for the load, I know it will be pushing things closely. Mag weighs 11 lbs per gallon. The tank is 350 gal. That is 3,850 lbs. The skid weighs about 300 lbs with pump and motor. That is 4150 lbs on the rear axle. I wonder what the empy weight is on the rear axle? Then we would add the 4150 to it. It should still be less than the 6000 lb capacity of the two E rated tires. Some of the load is going to distribute to the front so not all of the 4150 will wind up on the rear.
    Now, here is the killer. I live in the mountains and drive curvy roads. Although rarely any distance fully loaded.
    what do you think? Safe or not safe??
     
  16. John DiMartino

    John DiMartino PlowSite.com Veteran
    Messages: 2,154

    The 285 D ranfe tires I use are rated for 3380 each at 65 psi.I knwo they arent as thick as E's but they hold more.My ram is confortable at 11000-ive had it weighing 12000+ it needs new shocks a little now,which really becomes apparent at 12000,it dont bottom,but it cycles up and down after a bump.I dont like going over 11000 with mine. Yo ucould always get the 19.5" rims and tires, a lot of guys o nthe TDR have bought the Rickson package ,there are others,those tires are good for 6000-8000 each.Wander and sway would be eliminated too,at least fro mthe tires standpoint.
     
  17. wyldman

    wyldman Member
    Messages: 3,265

    I think with the kind of load I'd be going with a dually.The lower GVWR will be pretty easily exceded with that kinda weight in the back of a 3/4 ton.The dually will be a lot more stable carrying that tank around corners too.

    4150 for the tank setup,plus the plow weight would be close to 5000 lbs of load,plus the driver,fuel,tools etc.Just too much for a 3/4 ton.
     
  18. szorno

    szorno Senior Member
    Messages: 308

    I'm currently using an 86 chevy K30 dually. It only has a 350 and so I was thinking of a better way to do things. I guess the 3/4 T beef-up is not going to be the answer I hoped for. I guess I will hold out for the dually. OR just never fill the tank past 275 gal. Thanks guys. Ya made me think harder than I have in a while. scott:waving: