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33x12 tires ok for plowing ?

Discussion in 'Chevy Trucks' started by 00silverado, Sep 23, 2014.

  1. 00silverado

    00silverado Member
    Messages: 47

    I have a 2000 Silverado 1500 regular cab long bed 5.3L. It has 3 inch lift and 2500hd suspension on 305 70 r16 (33×12) toyo Mt with 90% tread left. I have a 7.6 ft unimount . Just wondering if I will be ok with these tires
     
  2. 1olddogtwo

    1olddogtwo PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 11,529

    A light truck with flotation tires.......good luck
     
  3. m.$terner

    m.$terner Senior Member
    Messages: 178

    generally speaking, NO. big wide tires like that look great but are deff not the best for plowing. Will they work, yes but if you can pick up a spare set I would deff do so. a 265 or 245 would be better, I personally prefer to run like a 235/85/r16 on my trucks. all that weight on a small width tire means a lot less spinning and chances of getting stuck
     
  4. maxwellp

    maxwellp PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,112

    I used to be in the skinny tire corner. But the last two trucks I have bought had 285/75/16, a big fat tire. Anyway I have found the skinny tire thing to be a wives tail. They plow fine and I notice no loss in traction but have the added benefit of not sinking to china on softer ground (read less grass damage if you have to go on it). SO if that is what you have use them. :)
     
  5. Sawboy

    Sawboy PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,591

    Physics is not a wives tale (tail: animal, tale: story)

    Like Olddog said, big floatation tires on a light truck......not good
    $terner is spot on
     
  6. maxwellp

    maxwellp PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,112

    You may have more weight on a smaller spot, but with a wider tire you will have more sipes on the ground for greater traction. How come drag cars use fat tires? I think the physics that you use is wrong. To each his own. Just telling the OP my experience. Tail tale auto correct whatever
     
  7. SnoFarmer

    SnoFarmer PlowSite Fanatic
    from N,E. MN
    Messages: 8,542

    The only disagreement I have is, that there really isn't much debate among those who know anything about driving in or plowing snow

    The "Macho men" are embarrassed to be seen with skinny tires on their trucks...it's all about looks to them.

    A skinnier tire will have higher PSI than a wider tire - which helps the tire get to the road surface.
    Plus this higher Psi will also let it get a bite on hardtack snow or ice where a wide tire can't and the wide tire will just make a ice patch under it.
     
  8. SnoFarmer

    SnoFarmer PlowSite Fanatic
    from N,E. MN
    Messages: 8,542

    :laughing:
    well then prove all of us wrong.
    go get your self some wide slicks and then go and try to plow with them and report back.
    when was the last time you saw a dragster on snow.:laughing:

    is the dragster on dry pavement or 6" of snow.

    There might be a difference in applacation..


     
  9. maxwellp

    maxwellp PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,112

    Ok You completely missed the point
    I will agree to disagree :)
     
  10. SnoFarmer

    SnoFarmer PlowSite Fanatic
    from N,E. MN
    Messages: 8,542

    ah no,
    I think you did.
    the sipping on the wide tire will help but they lack friction from weight per sq inch for there to be any real gain
    a narrower tire will have more traction IE, bite on the sipping.

    here is the formula(and no, it's not a play on the word fun)
    F=uN

    F is the force generated, u is the coefficient of friction, and N is the weight on the surface considered
     
  11. 00silverado

    00silverado Member
    Messages: 47

    But is 2.5 inches wider then stock really going to make a difference
     
  12. Sawboy

    Sawboy PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,591

    Slicks on a drag strip compared to sipes on snow is the dumbest comparison I've ever heard in my life. EVER.

    Physics is physics.

    Sno is spot on. It's Macho Man syndrome.
     
  13. SnoFarmer

    SnoFarmer PlowSite Fanatic
    from N,E. MN
    Messages: 8,542

    2.5" x 4 = 9"
    almost the with of a stock tire.
    it adds up quick.

     
  14. 00silverado

    00silverado Member
    Messages: 47

    So is it worth going out and spending $500 on a set of 245 75 r16 cooper at3 which u herd a good in snow or just stick with my 33x12 toyo m/t. Just curious I understand the whole physics part of it
     
  15. dieselss

    dieselss PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 10,971

    Yes it's worth it. Plowing and spinning your tires every time you drop your plow, is that worth it
     
  16. snowish10

    snowish10 PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,080

    I got 35 x10 tires, I dont have a problem in the snow. But I do have a 4 ton truck.
     
  17. WIPensFan

    WIPensFan PlowSite Veteran
    Messages: 3,495

    You'll be fine with your tires. If you don't like how they perform for the first few times plowing then consider something different.
     
  18. 00silverado

    00silverado Member
    Messages: 47

    My truck comes in at 5700lbs according the the scale at my local dump . With the plow which is another 500-600 lbs and if I put 300 lbs of blast I should be around 6 600 lbs
     
  19. snowish10

    snowish10 PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,080

    Id get a set of not as wide of tires for the winter especially since you have a 1500.
     
  20. kimber750

    kimber750 PlowSite Veteran
    Messages: 3,663


    Years ago I had an F150 with goodyear MT's while it did good off road, it was horrible in the snow. MT designed tires have very little sipping and large lugs are great for dirt but IMO suck on slippery surfaces. I now run 285/75 dynapros which do have a good bit of sipping and work well for me.