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22 Series Trips too easily?

Discussion in 'Sno-Way Discussion' started by PhatSupraTT, Jan 31, 2008.

  1. PhatSupraTT

    PhatSupraTT Member
    Messages: 33

    It's my first year plowing and I've got a 22 series mounted on a 2000 Tacoma. I know it's a light duty plow but it seems to trip too easily. I plow several apartment buildings, one is gravel. If I hit what I consider to be a small rut, the plow trips flat on it's face and it's quite irritating. A lot of times vehicles are in the way so I of course plow around them. If they aren't there the next snowfall, it's a headache when I plow through those previously unplowed areas.

    First question is: I assume the trip springs are factory set and shouldn't be messed with? There looks to be and adjustment but I don't know if I should mess with it. Thoughts?

    Second question: Having a Tacoma, I plow in 4-low and think I might be going too slow. Because of the tripping factor, sometimes I plow at a walking pace with my ass clenched waiting for it to trip! When I speed up (not sure of the exact MPH), it seems to trip less but it's more violent when it does. Which is worse?

    Thanks guys.

    Mark
     
  2. snowman2025

    snowman2025 Senior Member
    Messages: 152

    You can adjust the trip springs on your plow. If I remember right, you tight the springs until you can fit a small piece of paper between the coils.
     
  3. mnormington

    mnormington Senior Member
    Messages: 156

    I have the same plow and I have the springs cranked all the way tight. You can't put anything between the coils and it still trips pretty easily. I kinda wish I could stretch the springs even more. It seems like they are not the right size springs.

    Small issue for me, really, but an issue just the same.
     
  4. toby4492

    toby4492 2000 Club Member
    Messages: 2,513

    The trip springs are adjustable. Check them as per snowman's directions.

    Have you tried running with the plow shoes on the gravel lot? Also are you plowing with Down pressure or in float? With the DP system active the blade is always going to try and find the low points on the ground. When contour changes it will sense a loss of pressure when you go into a dip and pulse oil to the down side of the cylinder.
     
  5. PhatSupraTT

    PhatSupraTT Member
    Messages: 33

    The only time I use DP on the gravel lot is when I backdrag, never going forward. I've considered picking up a pair of shoes but want to make sure I exhaust all efforts before spending more money. Out of curiosity, what's the price of shoes?

    I'll do the "paper check" tonight but the look pretty tight, not sure I'll get a piece of paper in there.

    Thanks guys
     
  6. Ctll

    Ctll Member
    from midwest
    Messages: 82

    02 Tacoma plow

    I plow with an 02 Tacoma with ST 90 on it. If you put enough weight in the back you should be able to plow lots most of the time in 2wd much faster than walking speed (10mph+ much faster if nothing is in the way). The only time I have to use 4wd is doing drives or pushing back piles. Very seldom do I have to use 4lo. I have air springs on the rear Northwest offroad heavy duty coil springs in the front, and put up to 30 bags of Ice melt in the bed but I try to not let it plow with less than 500lbs in the bed. Make sure your down pressure is not on in gravel lots and I either use the plow shoes or just raise the plow up about and inch. Hope that helps. By the way I had the same problem with my tripping to easy when it was new, and I adjust the springs until I could slide a dime between the coils and it fixed it. Good Luck.
     
  7. basher

    basher PlowSite Fanatic
    from 19707
    Messages: 8,992

    Anytime your plowing gravel the blade will dig in and trip, unless the gravel is level and frozen. i think your plow is probably fine it's just the nature of the beast (gravel not SW:D) to dig in.It's the effects of a proper attack angle. The blade try to get down to the ground rather then ski on top. Helps the blade clean better. That attack angle is the reason weight is not an issue with clean up, a properly designed blade does not need to be heavy.

    Try dropping your blade then lifting it until you feel the front suspension load a little.
    DP is only really necessary back dragging or dealing with frozen packed snow, even then once the blade get "under" the snow the snows own weight holds it down. this leads to the blade wanting to become a grader in the gravel and soft soil. I plow a church that has me push some of the grassy areas on Sundays. If I don't backdrag it all, or lift the blade clear off ground contact I'm digging basements:D.
     
  8. mnormington

    mnormington Senior Member
    Messages: 156

    I have the shoes ($100 BTW) and it still trips. No downpressure going forward for me, either.
     
  9. oldmankent

    oldmankent PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,318

    The way I understand the springs is that the more air space between the coils the tighter the springs are. If the spring is totally closed it is probably a little loose. Am I reading this wrong?
     
  10. toby4492

    toby4492 2000 Club Member
    Messages: 2,513

    I always found that using a pc of paper or a business card as my measuring stick for coil seperation worked best. If you get to much seperation the springs will not function as well.
     
  11. basher

    basher PlowSite Fanatic
    from 19707
    Messages: 8,992

    We use the "importance of filing your warranty" sheet that comes with the plow dead center of the spring.

    PhatSupraTT; Check the level of the plows aframe in the loaded for plowing configuration. To high a mount height will change the attack angle and increase the tripping action.
     
  12. oldmankent

    oldmankent PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,318

    So, if they are spread more than that, do you think the plow would be less likely to trip?
     
  13. basher

    basher PlowSite Fanatic
    from 19707
    Messages: 8,992


    Maybe, but the spring rate is the spring rate is the spring rateLOL. You might raise the intail trip point a little but not a lot.

    Make sure your ploys are in place in the swing arm. They are hard to see but make sure they're there. they have a lot to do with controoling trip and return
     
  14. oldmankent

    oldmankent PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,318

    Not to be ********, but what do you mean "ploys"?
     
  15. toby4492

    toby4492 2000 Club Member
    Messages: 2,513

    No need to feel ********. I had to think a little about what he meant too. :dizzy:

    What basher is trying to say is that on all newer models (22, 26, 29, and 32 series) there are shock killer urethane pads that are installed between the blade and where it attaches to the swing frame. Apparently basher prefers to them as ploy. LOL I think he meant to type poly. :D
     
  16. nbenallo33

    nbenallo33 Senior Member
    Messages: 826

    haha atleast i wasnt the only one haha
     
  17. basher

    basher PlowSite Fanatic
    from 19707
    Messages: 8,992

    Sorry :blush2: Yes I meant Polys and yes I was referring to the "shock killer urethane pads "

    The guys refer to them as "polys" as they are Poly-urethane. Much easier then going "Yo did you see the Urethane shock killer system parts" Kinda like we always call it Lexan even though depending upon manufacturer it could be Hyziod, of a couple other trade names, call it Shop slang;)

    The blades trip easier and return harder without them!
     
  18. oldmankent

    oldmankent PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,318

    Well I have a 25 series with no ploys, polys, or shock killer system. And yes, it does return quite hard. Just the nature of the beast.